Community Info

Thursday, September 7, 2017

The Weekly List: 25 Things To Do In Tucson In The Next 10 Days

Posted By and on Thu, Sep 7, 2017 at 10:00 AM

Your Weekly guide to keeping busy in the Old Pueblo.

Shop Local

Mercado Flea Market. There’s something for everyone at these second Sunday flea markets, which begin this month. Antiques treasures, collectible tchotchkes, vintage pieces, artwork—it’s fun for the whole family. Bring the kids, bring the grandparents. You can bring your own booth if you contact Mercado San Agustin in advance to get the details. But please do not bring fleas. 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 10. Mercado San Agustin, 100 S. Avenida del Convento. Free.

Good Times Silent Auction. The Tucson Cactus and Succulent Society will be holding at least three silent auctions of cacti and succulents for this extravaplantza. After the auction concludes, a free area of pottery, plants and other garden-related items will open up, along with $2, $5 and $10 tables with items for purchase if you feel like being a big spender. Free ice cream, complete with all the fixins’, will be available as well. 3-5 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 10. Sky Islands Public High School, 6000 E. 14th St. Free.

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Tucson’s Fall Gem Show. The mega-event gem, mineral and fossil showcase isn’t hitting the city until January 2018, but the miniature fall version is this week! Shop for minerals, fossils, gems and beads at venues throughout town, some of which are open to the public. Quartz, turquoise, sterling silver jewelry, jade, crystals and agates are just some of the offerings at the event, where there will be jewelry and gemstones from all over the world. Thursday, Sept. 7, at 10 a.m. to Sunday, Sept. 10, at 4 p.m. Tucson Expo Center, 3750 E. Irvington Road. $10.


Shows


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Free Range Country. The “crown jewel” of Downtown Tucson is about to be joined by some of Tucson’s twangiest jewels. Fox Tucson Theatre is presenting a free concert series in conjunction with Second Saturdays Downtown. Singer Mike Loychick recently took over the vocals for The County Line, bringing a country twist to a group that started off in 2012 as a rock cover band. The Jim Howell Band will be playing songs from their debut album and an EP released in March that speak on humankind’s dichotomies. Tucson native Caiden Brewer, who is influenced by Blake Shelton, Johnny Cash and Lynyrd Skynyrd, will be playing as well. 6:30-10 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 9. Fox Theatre, 17 W. Congress. Free.

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Friday, September 1, 2017

3...2...1... Lyft Off

Posted By on Fri, Sep 1, 2017 at 2:36 PM

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Ridesharing service Lyft announced yesterday that it has expanded to offer statewide services to a total of 40 states, including Arizona.

Before today, there were only eight states that had full coverage from Lyft, but this gives them the largest coverage area of any ride sharing company in the U.S. (we're looking at you, Uber), with services available to 94 percent of the U.S. population (287 million people).

Although Uber's ride service launched in Tucson several years ago and its food delivery service launched in the city last month, Lyft’s introduction will offer residents an alternative to Uber, which has been  entrenched in controversy over the last year.

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Wednesday, August 30, 2017

Dreamers #HereToStay

Posted By on Wed, Aug 30, 2017 at 10:35 AM

Reports came out last week that Trump will decide any day whether to keep Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. DACA recipients, or Dreamers, together with immigration lawyers, activists and allies gathered in front of Tucson City Hall, on Aug. 29, to say they're not going anywhere.

DACA recipients and allies tell the Trump administration that they're here to stay: "El pueblo unido jamás será vencido." - DANYELLE KHMARA
  • Danyelle Khmara
  • DACA recipients and allies tell the Trump administration that they're here to stay: "El pueblo unido jamás será vencido."

The Obama-era ruling protects close to 800,000 people whose parents brought them into the country, undocumented, as children. DACA makes it legal for them to work, get a driver's license, pay in-state tuition to college and to live their lives without fear of deportation.

"We continue to hear these threats against DACA," said Jessica Rodriguez, a member of the humanitarian organization Living United for Change in Arizona. "This is not going to stop. We're going to continue to take the streets. We're going to continue to call on our officials. We are not going to stop."

Immigration attorney Mo Goldman said to focus energy toward local elected officials.

"Call out representatives like Rep. McSally, who has said that she supports the DACAmented community and the Dreamers," he said. "She's been out there. She said it, and she needs to be held accountable. She needs to be on the phone talking to the White House."

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Wednesday, August 23, 2017

Anti-Racist Protesters Demand Supervisor Miller Resign

Posted By on Wed, Aug 23, 2017 at 10:09 AM

About 600 protesters waving familiar posters gathered in front of Pima County’s Administration Building on Tuesday evening: Refugees Welcome, Black Lives Matter, No Human is Illegal. In an age where almost every week, people take to the streets to voice their outrage with the government, people are getting creative. “Dumbledore's Army accepting members” and “Ctrl+Alt+Delete” are a few of the more creative signs.

The focus of Tucsonans Against Racism Protest and Rally was County Supervisor Ally Miller, who announced her white pride on Facebook, only hours after a white supremacist mowed down a crowd of protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia, on Aug. 12. For the last week, citizens and fellow board members implored her to apologize for her comments.

And now it seems the time for apologies has passed, at least for the hundreds that gathered on Tucson’s downtown. People want her gone. It was no accident this rally was planned on the day Trump addressed supporters in Phoenix. Inside the Phoenix Convention Center, Trump hinted at pardoning former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio for illegally continuing racist practices, and Trump decried the “very dishonest media,” blaming them for the backlash to his “many sides” statement following Charlottesville. Outside, thousands protested and were finally dispersed when police set off tear gas into the crowd. In Tucson, people chanted—families with toddlers in strollers, old ladies waving American flags, teenagers standing up for their future.

People of every age, creed and color shouted, “This is what democracy looks like,” and held their signs high as cars passed, honking their approval.


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Monday, August 14, 2017

Tucson Peacefully Protested White Supremacy!

Posted By on Mon, Aug 14, 2017 at 12:32 PM


"All this organization in less than a day—no sirens, no helicopters." - CURTIS ENDICOTT
  • Curtis Endicott
  • "All this organization in less than a day—no sirens, no helicopters."

Sunday, Aug. 13: We were late. Ten minutes behind the hundreds of marchers, and a four-year-old in tow. The photographer offered us a shaded seat until they circled back. But this was no time to sit still. Hate and intolerance had once more surfaced on a national level at the Charlottesville, Virginia white nationalist march. We paused to remove a rock from my son's shoe, and that's when we met Faith. She is pregnant and tired. But it feels too isolating and helpless to stay at home today. We stop for water and a hug at one of three aid stations along the route. All this organization in less than a day—no sirens, no helicopters. Then we hear the chant, "Through love, not hate, let's make America great." Black and gay, Mexican and Muslim, all were walking in unison.
But this was no time to sit still. - CURTIS ENDICOTT
  • Curtis Endicott
  • But this was no time to sit still.

As we passed frat row, six white guys hung together jeering, "Blue Lives Matter." An angry student paused to take their picture. "So that's what privilege looks like," he yells back. Then the black man beside me lays a hand on the marcher's shoulder, "They've just never had something bad happen in their lives yet." A woman up front starts to sing, "And you will know that we are family by our love, by our love." When we hit the 4th Avenue tunnel, our collective voice resounds through the streets. "And you will know that we are family by our love."
A woman up front starts to sing, "And you will know that we are family by our love, by our love." - CURTIS ENDICOTT
  • Curtis Endicott
  • A woman up front starts to sing, "And you will know that we are family by our love, by our love."

Thursday, August 10, 2017

Store to Stomach: Food Delivery Services Hit Tucson

Posted By on Thu, Aug 10, 2017 at 4:25 PM

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Tucson residents can bring a whole new meaning to the phrase "couch potato" by having potatoes delivered right to their door: in original spud form or in frenched form.

Grocery delivery service Instacart launched in Tucson on Aug. 8 and UberEATS, the food delivery branch of the popular ride service, launched in the city on Aug. 9.

Instacart allows customers to explore online "aisles" and fill virtual carts, then set a time (anywhere from an hour to a week in advance) to have the food delivered to their front door. For the initial Tucson launch, Instacart has partnered with with Bashas’, Whole Foods Market, Petco, Natural Grocers, CVS, Fry’s and Costco—without a membership. Partners share inventories with Instacart, which means that what customers see online matches what's available in-store.

Orders must be a minimum of $35 (which isn't hard to do at a grocery store), and there's a flat delivery fee of $5.99. As a promotion to new Tucson customers, Instacart is offering $20 off customers' first order, and free delivery. This means that not only can you can get $50 worth of groceries for $30, but they'll be delivered right to your front door!

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UberEATS delivers food from 80 restaurant partners, including eegees, Baggin's Gourmet Sandwiches and Chickenuevo, to customers' doors. UberEATS General manager and UA alum Clay Carroll said that there are about 1000 total Uber drivers in Tucson, some of whom do rides, some of whom do food delivery, and some who do both, for a large service area.

"All the way from Oro Valley all the way down to South Tucson," he said.

Uber customers must download the UberEATS app separately, but log in using their regular Uber account. First-time customers can use the promo code provided by a friend to get $5 off their first order.

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Thursday, July 27, 2017

In The Flesh: Jimmy Carr and the Awkward Moments Create a Raucous Musical Celebration Aboard Sun Link

Posted By on Thu, Jul 27, 2017 at 4:30 PM

Jimmy Carr and the Awkward Moments ripping it up aboard a Sun Link streetcar. - XAVIER OMAR OTERO
  • Xavier Omar Otero
  • Jimmy Carr and the Awkward Moments ripping it up aboard a Sun Link streetcar.

Eager passengers gathered under dark, threatening clouds at Mercado San Agustin station, early Saturday evening. It was a celebration—a moving one too thanks to Jimmy Carr and The Awkward Moments—to commemorate the third anniversary of Tucson’s modern streetcar (Sun Link). (Since its July, ’14 launch, the streetcar has provided approximately 2.93 million rides to passengers.)

Once everyone that could possibly fit onto the streetcar was loaded, the tram departed. The affable Jimmy Carr addressed the audience with a handheld megaphone, that he also used for singing, before he cued into action The Awkward Moments. (Violinist Samantha Bounkeua, brothers Tony and Dante Rosano on sousaphone and trumpet, Hillary Engle and Javier Garcia on drums and percussion, Erin Henderson on kazoo and vocals, guitarist Johnny O’Halloran, and Carr on accordion and vocals.) Mixing Carr’s gruff blues vocals with the sounds of gypsy jazz, americana, klezmer, classical and elements lifted straight from the high-school marching band of Anytown, USA, the sound landed somewhere between Gogol Bordello and Slavic Soul Party.

Beloved by Tucsonans, renowned for their improvisational dexterity, fans called requests, which Carr tried to accommodate—at least for a few bars—whether his heady combo band knew the song or not. According to Carr, “The band started on the streets of Tucson busking for beer money.” The group began with O'Halloran on saw and Carr (a Fat Possum Records session man) on accordion and vocals.

By the time the crammed, music-filled streetcar hit downtown, Tlaloc, the Aztecian god of rain, shook his rattle. By the time the tram reached UA’s Main Gate Square, where the band disembarked to continue the revelry inside Gentle Ben’s Brewing Company, the rain was pissing down in sheets.
Jimmy Carr and the Awkward Moments at Gentle Ben's. - XAVIER OMAR OTERO
  • Xavier Omar Otero
  • Jimmy Carr and the Awkward Moments at Gentle Ben's.

Bounkeua tells Tucson Weekly of the streetcar experience. “[It’s] one of my favorite gigs. There is an immediate, intimate and very direct relationship with the audience, practically zero separation between us and them, as we find a way to balance in this small, moving, crowded space. It's like surfing and jamming at the same time. It suits the improvisatory nature of our music well; we are, after all, called the ‘Awkward Moments.’ Super fun.” And their performance? Far from awkward. It was pulsating with life.

Jimmy Carr and The Awkward Moments have released five records to date, all available as downloads on bandcamp.


Burlesque Battle of the Bands This Weekend? Yep, You Read That Right.

Posted By on Thu, Jul 27, 2017 at 2:32 PM

Then fetchingly monikered Lola Torch explains the Tucson Libertine League’s second event with this tagline: “We guarantee we’ll make you sweat, but we promise you’ll love it."
Les Femmes Marveilleuses in rehearsal.
  • Les Femmes Marveilleuses in rehearsal.

It’s unlike anything else that you likely see in a Moldy Pueblo summer. 

Combining the raw power and tension of rock ‘n’ roll with the expressive movement of dance, Tucson Libertine League’s Burlesque Battle of the Bands promises to be a monumental clash of sorts. Think of it: Hellfire rockers the Sugar Stains will battle against blues titan Tom Walbank while providing raucous live music for acro-act Les Femmes Marveilleuses, a maverick half-time marching band Hi Polish Floor Show and Tucson Libertine League’s burlesque dancers.

Torch, aka Emilie Marchand, president and producer at Tucson Libertine League, fleshes out, “I wanted to bring something different to the Tucson stage. We haven't really seen burlesque done to these types of music live. Usually when live music is involved it's more traditional ’40s music. We're bringing the rock ‘n’ roll!”

Here’s the tale of the tape:

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Staff Pick

James G. Davis (1931-2016): Down at the Tower Bar, A Retrospective

Celebrating the career of Tucson artist James G. Davis with a selection of paintings and prints made… More

@ Etherton Gallery Sat., Sept. 9, 7-10 p.m. and Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Nov. 11 135 S. Sixth Ave.

» More Picks

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