Feminism

Thursday, November 8, 2018

Sluts of Tucson Walk the Walk, Talk the Talk

Posted By on Thu, Nov 8, 2018 at 5:01 PM

The SlutWalk is a worldwide protest march that is all about reclaiming the word slut, combating rape culture and taking solidarity with survivors of sexual assault. Tucson's 2018 chapter of the walk hit the sidewalks of Downtown Tucson on the evening Nov. 5th.

According to The Guardian, The movement started in 2011 in Toronto, in response to a cop, Michael Sanguinetti, said: "I've been told I'm not supposed to say this – however, women should avoid dressing like sluts in order not to be victimized."

This year's walk was organized by the UA's Women & Gender Resource Center (WGRC) and Feminists Organized to Resist, Create and Empower (FORCE). The march began from UA's Old Main and ended with a closing ceremony at the Rialto.

"We thought it was especially important this year with the #Metoo movement. Throughout every single march we have been tried to create a safe place and a place to speak out," said Lilly Cain, who helped organize the march. "We want it to be seen and known that we should be able to be safe in these streets, no matter how we dress. It shouldn't matter what time of day or night it is. We should not have to be surrounded by a crowd to feel safe in our own space, in our own bodies."

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Tuesday, November 6, 2018

Women Account for 39 Percent of Arizona Ballot, Among Highest in Nation

Posted By and on Tue, Nov 6, 2018 at 12:57 PM

A record 39 percent of the candidates on Arizona’s ballot Tuesday are women, mirroring a national surge in female candidates that many believe started with the Women’s March the day after President Donald Trump’s inauguration in January 2017. - (PHOTO BY ALEXIS EGELAND/CRONKITE NEWS)
  • (Photo by Alexis Egeland/Cronkite News)
  • A record 39 percent of the candidates on Arizona’s ballot Tuesday are women, mirroring a national surge in female candidates that many believe started with the Women’s March the day after President Donald Trump’s inauguration in January 2017.

Anita Malik had never run for political office before, but the aftershock of the 2016 election – including the #MeToo movement and the Brett Kavanaugh hearings – pushed her to get her name on the ballot.

“Everything that was going on just made me want to step in and take that on,” said Malik, a Democrat, of her decision to challenge four-term Rep. David Schweikert, R-Fountain Hills, in a district where registered Republicans outnumber Democrats by almost 70,000.

Malik is one of 90 women on the ballot for state or federal office in Arizona this year, accounting for a record-setting 39 percent of the candidates in the state.

That mirrored a national trend in what many national organizations have said would be the Year of the Woman in elections. Cronkite News was able to review ballots in 44 states and found that the number of women running for office ranged from 20 percent in West Virginia to 42 percent in Hawaii.

Most were above 30 percent and Arizona trailed only Hawaii, Oregon, Nevada and Rhode Island for the prevalence of women on the ballot.

In Arizona, the numbers have been steadily rising from 1974, when women made up just 14 percent of the candidates on the ballot. The change is most easily seen in the race to replace Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Arizona, where Democrat Kyrsten Sinema and Republican Martha McSally are vying to become the state’s first female U.S. senator.

Arizona political analyst Jason Rose said more women taking a seat at the political table is “a great thing for American history and American democracy.”

“For too long, the American government has largely been ruled by old white men,” Rose said. “And old white men can tend to take a country club approach, a business as usual approach, and not appreciate or address issues of import to more than half the public.”

Rose said the influx of women would bring more moderate policies and a shift in priorities that could potentially bridge the gap between some more divisive political groups.

League of Women Voters CEO Virginia Kase said that the number of women on the ballot this year shows a clear trend of women “starting to realize that they can have it all.”

“They can be a mom, they can be a wife, they can be all of those things that they want to be, and be a great political candidate,” Kase said. “I think that that’s something that we’re starting to see more than ever before.”

But for Meghan Kelly, a Democrat running her first race against a Republican incumbent in the Delaware House of Representatives, the inspiration to run came when a male colleague tried to make a pass at her at work. She said she asked for professional help and he tried to initiate an intimate relationship with her.

“This is not a man’s world,” she said. “It’s our world to share, and men need to learn to respect and honor women too.”

Malik, likewise, said she ran to stand up for women’s rights.

“Really, women have almost become ‘the other’ again for this administration,” she said. “The idea of attacking women’s rights all across the board and just attacking women as a different class is unacceptable, and it put women in a place of, you know, ‘This is not OK.'”

Kase said the increased number of women on the ballot is likely to lead to more female office holders after Election Day. She sees that as a step in the right direction for the women’s movement as a whole, and the beginning of an exciting trend.

“There are always these little anthills … but sometimes those anthills feel like mountains for women,” Kase said. “But what we’re realizing is that we can overcome any obstacle that gets in our way, and we can move those mountains aside.”

Malik said that whether she wins or loses Tuesday, she does not think this will be “just a blip” in her life. She plans to stay involved in politics, whether that means running for office again or just getting more involved politically, and she expects the same in the rest of the country.

“I think 2016 really woke women up and fuelled that flame of, ‘You know what, if you’re not going to represent me, then I’m going to go ahead and do it,'” Malik said. “So this was the starting point, but it’s definitely not the ending point.”

For more stories from Cronkite News, visit cronkitenews.azpbs.org.

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Wednesday, October 31, 2018

Equality Tour Aims to Include Arizona in Historic Change

Posted By on Wed, Oct 31, 2018 at 2:11 PM


click image EQUAL MEANS EQUAL
  • Equal Means Equal

The Equality Tour is coming to Tucson. The event is organized by Equal Means Equal, a charitable organization of the Heroica Foundation. The Equality Tour will feature speakers and comedic and musical performances all in support of passing the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA).

The Equal Rights Amendment is a proposed amendment to the U.S Constitution that would guarantee equal rights to both men and women, which would work to eliminate gender pay gaps.

So far, 37 of the 38 states needed to amend the U.S Constitution to include women have voted to ratify, with Nevada and Illinois voting yes in just the past year and a half. Arizona has the potential to be a history-making state because the amendment will only be passed if one more state ratifies. 

Speakers at the event will include Kamala Lopez, the executive director of Equal Means Equal, Pamela Powers, Arizona State Representative of District 9, Victoria Steele, candidate for Arizona State Representative District 9, Athena Salman, Arizona State Senator of District 26 and Natalie White, Co-Director of Equal Means Equal and Feminist Artist.

The musical performance is Voices for Change (VFC), a community organization that brings awareness to important social and political issues through music. Soloists will include Ali Handal, Jason Chu and Anthony Fedorov.

Also at the event will be Nobody's Funny, a team of stand-up comics. Performing comics include Samantha Baxley, Buffy Metler, Eugenia Kuzmin, Joel Marshall, Or Mash and Jessica Winther.

The free event will be on Thursday, Nov. 1 at 6:30 p.m. and will be located at the MSA Annex Festival Grounds near the Mercado at 267 S. Avenida Del Convento.

To purchase free tickets for admission or for more information about Equal Means Equal, visit: http://equalmeansequal.org/

Tags: , , , , ,

Tuesday, October 9, 2018

YWCA's 30th Annual Women's Leadership Conference: Speaker Preview

Posted By on Tue, Oct 9, 2018 at 4:12 PM

YWCA SOUTHERN ARIZONA
  • YWCA Southern Arizona

The 30th Annual Women’s Leadership Conference will take place on Oct. 19 from 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at JW Marriott star Pass Resort. The conference will feature keynote speakers Alejandra Y. Castillo, Jes Baker and Kelly Fryer. This event is hosted by YWCA Southern Arizona.

YWCA SOUTHERN ARIZONA
  • YWCA Southern Arizona
Alejandra Y. Castillo: CEO of YWCA USA, Castillo leads a network of 210 associations serving 2.2 million women and girls in 46 states around the country and the District of Columbia. In 2014, she was appointed to serve as the national director of Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA) by the Obama Administration. She became the first Hispanic-American woman to lead the agency.

Jes Baker: An American writer, photographer and activist who is part of the body positive movement. She blogs about self-image at The Militant Baker. She founded the Body Love Conference and has authored two books: Things No One Will Tell Fat Girls: A Handbook for Unapologetic Living and Landwhale: On Turning Insults Into Nicknames, Why Body Image Is Hard, and How Diets Can Kiss My Ass.

YWCA SOUTHERN ARIZONA
  • YWCA Southern Arizona
Kelly Fryer: CEO of YWCA Southern Arizona. She was a founding board member and is a teacher in the Eller Social Innovation program at the University of Arizona. She previously served as Associate Professor of Leadership at Luther Seminary in St. Paul, MN. She offered leadership training where she helped hundreds of organizations and thousands of leaders across the U.S. and Canada learn "to do what matters." She also served as Executive Director of Arizona List in 2012 where she helped 39 women get elected to state and local office. She also just completed her 6-month sabbatical to run as candidate for Governor of Arizona.
click image YWCA SOUTHERN ARIZONA
  • YWCA Southern Arizona

At the festival, along with the three keynote speakers, there will be two empowering workshop tracks, 14 workshops, live screen-printing by Cream Design & Print, LinkedIn headshots and interactive group activities and networking with 400 leaders. Find more information here and register for tickets here.

Tucson Local Media is a sponsor of this event.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Friday, August 24, 2018

Reason's In-depth with Backpage.com's Founders

Posted By on Fri, Aug 24, 2018 at 2:42 PM

Sex Workers and their supporters gathered in Minneapolis to protest the recent raid and arrests at Backpage, in October 2016. Protesters say sites like Backpage.com allow them to work independently to screen clients and shutting them down exposes them to more risk. - FIBONACCI BLUE
  • Fibonacci Blue
  • Sex Workers and their supporters gathered in Minneapolis to protest the recent raid and arrests at Backpage, in October 2016. Protesters say sites like Backpage.com allow them to work independently to screen clients and shutting them down exposes them to more risk.

For an update on the Backpage.com shutdown and a deep dive into what led to the website's closure, check out Elizabeth Nolan Brown's great reporting.

Backpage started as the literal back page of the Phoenix New Times. Co-founders Michael Lacey and James Larkin started the weekly paper in 1970. And from the get-go, they were radical.

In Arizona, that meant taking ample swipes at Sheriff Joe Arpaio—who would eventually demand years' worth of personal data on New Times readers and have Lacey and Larkin jailed for writing about it—as well as anyone who cozied up to Arpaio, Republican Sen. John McCain, or his wealthy wife, Cindy. The paper would report on the McCains for their involvement with savings-and-loan scammer Charles Keating; dredge up Cindy's dad's connection to mobsters and murdered Arizona Republic journalist Don Bolles; and out Cindy as an opioid addict who forged prescriptions and stole pills from the children's charity she founded.

"We weren't trying to curry favor," says Larkin. "We didn't line up with the establishments in any city that we were involved in….We didn't really care what politicians saw in us. And that's come back to haunt us."

Nolan Brown speaks with the two men, arrested in Backpage's closure last spring, and looks at the case against the media moguls and the history of the Phoenix New Times and Backpage. 

Tags: , , ,

Thursday, August 23, 2018

New York State Senate Candidate Supports Sex Worker Rights

Posted By on Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 12:11 PM

New York state Senate candidate Julia Salazar - COURTESY PHOTO
  • courtesy photo
  • New York state Senate candidate Julia Salazar
Supporting human rights seems like a no brainer, but for sex workers that has, unfortunately, not been the case. Even Bernie Sanders voted for SESTA-FOSTA, the so-called anti-trafficking law passed earlier this year that shut down Backpage.com and other sites where sex workers could post ads and vet potential clients in a way that was safer and more empowering.

But just as laws that hurt sex workers become more extreme, people are throwing more support behind political candidates who openly oppose such laws, support sex worker rights and even call for complete decriminalization of the industry.

A state Senate candidate in New York is doing just that. Twenty-seven-year-old Julia Salazar, who heads into a Sept. 13 primary against an eight-term incumbent, has attended sex worker advocacy meetings and even has a decriminalization platform on her website.

The Intercept goes deeper into Salazar's advocacy as well as looking at some of the other political candidates standing up for the human rights of sex workers.
Salazar’s platform outlines steps toward decriminalization that include
an end to raids on massage parlors; working with district attorneys to
stop charging sex workers with crimes; and creating a network of
optional social services to address workers’ needs, such as housing,
child care, syringe access, and job training. Her platform would also
make it easier for sex workers with criminal records to access housing
and jobs, along with repealing the exemption for sex workers under New
York’s rape shield law.

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Thursday, July 5, 2018

Laughing Stock: Going with the flow

Posted By on Thu, Jul 5, 2018 at 3:28 PM

mo_at_flycatcher.jpg

“I like how shocked people are when you say 'c*nt.' It's like I have a nuclear bomb in my underpants, or a mad tiger or a gun.” So says Caitlin Moran, London Times journalist and author of "How to Build a Girl." She recently confirmed that "Lady Bird" star Beanie Feldstein will play the lead in that bestseller’s film adaptation.

While we’re waiting for that, we can continue to enjoy Tucson comedy's celebratory riffs on a girl’s anatomy.

Mo Urban and Steena Salido present another in their series, C*nts being C*nts Talking About Their C*nts! at 8 p.m., Friday, July 13. The show is 21+ and admission is $5 at Can’s Deli, 340 North 4th Ave. A portion of the proceeds goes to the YWCA of Southern Arizona Project Period, a program that provides sanitary menstrual products to those who can’t afford them. Donations of sanitary products for the program are also welcome.

Standup comedians include imports Amy Blackwell, who performs regularly at the Scottsdale Laugh Factory; Phoenix area favorites Leslie Barton, April Walterscheid and Kerrilynn Gallagher plus Hannah Tighe of Gilbert and Nikki Dinnella of Chandler. Tucson newcomers Chinna Garza and Megan Gossen make their C*nts debut.

Tucson Storyteller Gina Grande Santos and music by DJ Plastic Disease round out the show.

Estrogen Hour Remembers J-Fin

On Sunday, July 15, The Estrogen Hour, launchpad for a dozen or so women now prominent in Tucson comedy, honors one of the funniest, Jennifer Finley, who died last month of cancer.

Organizers Nancy Stanley and Mary Steed launched the Estrogen Hour a decade ago to support the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. According to Stanley, “We're departing from our usual fundraising to celebrate the life and comedy of our late friend whose candor and creativity made her a crowd favorite.” Proceeds go to Finley’s family to help defray her funeral expenses.

Stanley will host the show, a lineup of top local women comics and one featured “Guestosterone,” Dominic DiTolla. Comedians include Amber Frame; KXCI’s Bridgitte Thum; Cindell Hanson; Edna Meza Aguirre; Jessica Stapp, who also performs with Tucson Improv Movement; Mo Urban and Steena Salido, co-hosts of C*nts being C*nts Talking About Their C*nts!; Noel Hennessey of FST (Female Storytellers); and Suzie Sexton, host of the annual Comedy for Charity show at the Fox Theatre.

The Estrogen Hour takes place at 6:30 p.m., Sunday, July 15 at Laff’s Comedy Caffe. Tickets are $15 and there is a two-item minimum. The show is 21+ All proceeds benefit Finley's family.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Friday, February 9, 2018

Laughing Stock: Marga! Plus Parts and Flowers

Posted By on Fri, Feb 9, 2018 at 11:17 AM

Marga Gomez channels her father in Latin Standards Feb. 14 through 18. - MARGA GOMEZ
  • Marga Gomez
  • Marga Gomez channels her father in Latin Standards Feb. 14 through 18.

Marga!

“I grew up thinking I'm an artist because I didn't know any other way,” says actor, stand-up comedian and writer Marga Gomez. “My parents were both creative. All their friends were performing artists, so I was very comfortable in this world.”

Thus did Gomez become a Cuban Liza Minelli, only lesbian, del pueblo and a lot more savvy.

Her mid-century upbringing, although periodically rocky, surrounded Gomez with humor and filled her with drive. Her mother was a professional dancer; her father was a comedian and songwriter, and a producer of popular, Follies-scale variety shows for New York’s large community of Spanish-speaking immigrants. The hustle to stay on top of the entertainment business defined her family.

Between them, her parents have inspired half Gomez’ output of a dozen popular solo stage shows. The latest is Latin Standards, her tale of the father-daughter entertainer dynamic. Its title refers to the genre of her father’s music; “The comedy is a survival tool,” Gomez says. The New York Times named the show a Critic’s pick when it opened last year at The Public Theatre (Hamilton).

Borderlands Theatre presents Gomez performing Latin Standards February 14 through 18 at the Steinfeld Warehouse, 101 West 6th Street. The run opens with a Valentine’s day fiesta, including live music and food. Details and reservations are available at tinyurl.com/LatinStandards.
“I started writing solo shows because my parents were important but forgotten,” Gomez says. “I wanted the Latino community to know about these people and their times.

“At the end of the show, the great thing that people tell me is, even though I'm a Latina, I'm a lesbian, I'm from New York and I'm neurotic, people can totally relate to the father-daughter story, and they see their own father.”

Parts & Flowers

Mo Urban and Steena Salido bring their third C*nts Being C*nts Talking About C*nts Comedy Show to Flycatcher, free, at 9 p.m., Sunday, February 11 (after the Estrogen Hour benefit at Laff’s at 6). C*nts, etc., features seven comedians, including Genevieve Rice from Phoenix; poet Janet Spencer, and the all-woman rawk band, Sugar Stains. The event benefits the YWCA’s Project Period.

For Valentine’s Day, Hotel Congress presents Rebecca Tingley’s talk-show-format comedy show, Let’s Talk About Sex Baby, also featuring Randy Ford and Tammy King. Local comedians play truth or dare and answer audience questions.

Also on Valentine’s day, comedy siren Lisa Landry headlines a show at Laff’s where every woman will get a rose. Visit laffstucson.org for details.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Staff Pick

Carnival of Illusion: Magic, Mystery & Oooh La La!

This top-rated illusion show is "Revitalizing Magic" by blending an international travel theme with all the charms… More

@ Scottish Rite Grand Parlour Saturdays, 7:30-9 p.m. Continues through April 27 160 South Scott Ave

» More Picks

Submit an Event Listing

Popular Content

  1. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi: "I'm Confident We Will Win" (The Range: The Tucson Weekly's Daily Dispatch)
  2. Three Great Things to Do Today: Wednesday, Nov. 21 (The Range: The Tucson Weekly's Daily Dispatch)
  3. Claytoon of the Day: Ditching Pelosi (The Range: The Tucson Weekly's Daily Dispatch)
  4. Adoptable Pet - Dusty Needs a Home (The Range: The Tucson Weekly's Daily Dispatch)
  5. Three Great Things to Do in Tucson Today: Tuesday, Nov. 20 (The Range: The Tucson Weekly's Daily Dispatch)

© 2018 Tucson Weekly | 7225 Mona Lisa Rd. Ste. 125, Tucson AZ 85741 | (520) 797-4384 | Powered by Foundation