Politics

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Claytoon of the Day: Another Trump Sucker

Posted By on Tue, Nov 12, 2019 at 12:11 PM

CLAY JONES
  • Clay Jones
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Monday, November 11, 2019

Claytoon of the Day: Triggered Babies

Posted By on Mon, Nov 11, 2019 at 1:00 PM

Claytoon - CLAY JONES
  • Clay Jones
  • Claytoon
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Friday, November 8, 2019

Wilmington, Tulsa, Orangeburg And The Blackout of Black History

Posted By on Fri, Nov 8, 2019 at 4:06 PM

Tulsa Race Massacre, in flames, 1921 - COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA
  • courtesy of wikimedia
  • Tulsa Race Massacre, in flames, 1921

The main reason I began watching HBO's new series, Watchmen, was because I heard the show incorporated the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre as a central part of its narrative. (And, I should add, I'm a fan of comic-book-noir television series.) The show is set in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in an alternative present where descendants of the Massacre receive reparations — you know right there it's an alternative reality — and an underground group of white supremacists is waging war on the city's black population and the police.

The Tulsa Race Massacre is one of many horrifying chapters in this country's racist history. It is made that much more shameful by the fact that it has been purposely omitted from our historical narrative, as have many similarly horrific events. The 1898 Wilmington Massacre was misrepresented for decades as a victory of whites over a black uprising, when it was spoken of at all. The more recent 1968 Orangeburg Massacre was largely ignored and misrepresented by the contemporary press and has been little spoken of since.

I didn't know about the three events until recently. I would feel more ashamed of my ignorance of these and, I'm certain, other examples of large scale, racially motivated violence, except that I can't really blame myself for not knowing about what has been blacked out of the historical record. That being said, I willingly accept the collective guilt and shame for the white, "history is told by the winners" rendition of history which has glossed over, misrepresented and left out some of the greatest outrages perpetrated against minority groups in this country.

I have been working to remedy my ignorance for at least a decade. I posted about the Wilmington Massacre last year when I stumbled on a mention of it and did some research. Watchmen was my link to the Tulsa Race Massacre. I only learned of the Orangeburg Massacre a few days ago by chance when I was reading some biographical information on one of my favorite newspaper columnists.

Below are brief summaries of the three incidents with links to more complete histories.

The Wilmington Massacre, 1898

In the late nineteenth century, Wilmington was the largest city in North Carolina and home to a large, reasonably affluent and educated black populace. The state's Republican Party, which at the time deserved the label "the Party of Lincoln," had joined with the Populists to form the Fusion Coalition. By 1894, the Fusion party had taken the governorship and every other statewide office. Blacks served in local and state governments.

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Thursday, November 7, 2019

Profile in Courage: McSally Avoids CNN Cameras, Questions on Trump's Ukraine Scandal

Posted By on Thu, Nov 7, 2019 at 12:53 PM


This week's Skinny looks at the political dynamics here in Arizona surrounding the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump's Ukrainian shakedown, noting Sen. Martha McSally doesn't have any kind of response whether Trump's quid-pro-quo was a legitimate use of presidential power.

CNN is among the news outlets trying to get McSally to let the American people know where she stands—and, true to form, McSally is dodging another tough question. From yesterday's report:
Several Republicans have avoided answering questions about whether it's OK for Trump to ask Ukraine to probe his rivals.

One, Sen. Martha McSally of Arizona, took the long route — around the Capitol and around parked cars — to avoid cameras. Her aide stepped in front to say: "No comment."
Kinda reminds me of Brave Sir Robin...

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Claytoon of the Day: Read The Transcript

Posted By on Thu, Nov 7, 2019 at 9:22 AM

Claytoon - CLAY JONES
  • Clay Jones
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Wednesday, November 6, 2019

Claytoon of the Day: Cross Hairs For The Whistleblower

Posted By on Wed, Nov 6, 2019 at 1:59 PM

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Tuesday, November 5, 2019

Scenes From Election Night

Posted By on Tue, Nov 5, 2019 at 9:49 PM

Tucson Mayor-elect Regina Romero addresses a crowd at Hotel Congress with her family. Romero is the city's first Latina mayor. - KATHLEEN B. KUNZ
  • Kathleen B. Kunz
  • Tucson Mayor-elect Regina Romero addresses a crowd at Hotel Congress with her family. Romero is the city's first Latina mayor.


Hundreds of Tucsonans filled the patio of Hotel Congress on Tuesday evening to watch Democratic Regina Romero claim victory in Tucson's mayoral race.


After a high-energy performance from local band Santa Pachita, the  results showed Romero with a commanding lead over independent candidate Ed Ackerley and Green Party nominee Mike Cease.

Romero, who had represented Ward 1 for 12 years, launched her campaign to replace Mayor Jonathan Rothschild after he announced he would not seek a third term. She had 56 percent of the vote, compared to  Ackerley's 40 percent and Cease's 4 percent.

“As important and historic as this night is, let me tell you what excites me tonight,” Romero told the crowd. “The people of Tucson have said loud and clear that it’s time to take our city to the next level of progress and prosperity, that we’re ready to act boldly on climate, they we believe in fighting for social and economic justice for all Tucsonans. Regardless of what differences of opinion we have, we will always be one Tucson. Somos uno.”


Romero will be Tucson’s first Latina mayor. Congressman Raúl Grijalva was in attendance to introduce Romero, saying the night’s results “reflects who we are as a city.”


“It sends a wonderful message across not only the state of Arizona, but across this nation, that Tucson is part of the change in this country,” Grijalva said. “That Tucson believes in issues. That Tucson looks beyond their noses about what the future should be for themselves, their children and the generations to come.”


Romero's fellow Democrats had a good night, sweeping the council races. Ward 1 candidate Lane Santa Cruz, a former aide in Romero’s office, had 58 percent of the vote against Republican Sam Nagy and Green Party candidate Matthew Smith.


“It’s been so important for me during this campaign, having been born and raised here, that we build capacity with our young people, because they’re going to carry us into our future,” Santa Cruz said. “That’s been a big part of our campaign, it’s one of the things I’m going to keep pushing in the office, making sure that we have youth voices leading from the ground up.”


Incumbent Ward 2 councilman Paul Cunningham won another term, capturing 60 percent of the vote against Republican Ewart Williams and Green Party candidate William Peterson.


“We made history tonight, but it’s a part of a start of a history,” Cunningham said. “Tonight in Kentucky, the governor is now a Democrat. Tonight in Virginia, the state Senate is now Democrat. One year from tonight, the White House will be Democrat … This was our dry run, this was our rehearsal. I want to put the conservatives on notice, to quote my friend Ricky Bobby, we’re coming for you, alright?”


Ward 4 candidate Nikki Lee, who previously ran a campaign for a state representative seat, won 57 percent of the vote against Republican Mike Hicks and Green Party candidate Cara Bissell.


“I’m excited to work with this amazing group of people and continue to move Tucson forward, so thank you,” Lee said.

Romero Wins Mayor's Race, Dem Sweep Council, Sanctuary City Prop Defeated

Posted By on Tue, Nov 5, 2019 at 8:09 PM

Meet the new boss.
  • Meet the new boss.
Tucson City Council member Regina Romero is out way ahead of independent candidate Ed Ackerley and Green Party candidate Mike Cease, according to the first release of ballots in today's city election. Romero, who will make history as the city's first Latina mayor, has 56 percent of the vote, compared to Ackerley's 40 percent and Cease's 4 percent.

“Tonight’s results affirm that Tucsonans are ready for bold leadership that will take our city to the next level of progress and prosperity,” Romero said in prepared remarks. “At a time when our national politics have been sown with division, Tucsonans remain united by our shared desire to promote a safe, just, and sustainable city that provides economic opportunity for our families and future generations. This movement is open to everyone—whatever your background, whatever your party, whoever you voted for—let’s work together! We will always be one Tucson—somos uno.”

Meanwhile, Prop 205, aka the Sanctuary City initiative, is going down to defeat, with 71 percent of voters rejecting the proposal, which would have limited the ability of local police to inquire about immigration status and prevented federal law-enforcement agents from working with Tucson police unless they signed an agreement that would likewise limit their ability to inquire about immigration status.

In the Tucson City Council races, all the Democrats were safely ahead of Republican candidates. In Ward 1, Democrat Lane Santa Cruz had captured 58 percent of the vote against Republican Sam Nagy and Green Matthew Smith. In Ward 2, Democratic incumbent Councilman Paul Cunningham had 60 percent of the vote against Republican Ewart Williams and Green William Peterson. And in Ward 4, Nikki Lee had 57 percent of the vote against Republican Mike Hicks and Green Cara Bissell.

But none of them are going to see a pay raise. Prop 409, which would have raised salaries for council members, was also headed to defeat, with 60 percent of the voters rejecting it.

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