Thursday, September 21, 2017

Wildcats Can Suit Up And Save

Posted By on Thu, Sep 21, 2017 at 8:50 PM

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What do you get when you cross the UA career service center with JCPenney? For UA students with valid IDs, it’s some serious savings in the form of a 40 percent discount at a Suit Up event this Sunday, Sept. 24 from 6:30 to 10 p.m.

For guys, that means the opportunity to pick up a Stafford suit jacket and pants, and two each of shirts, ties, belts and shoes for under 200 bucks. For the ladies, a Worthington suit jacket, skirt, shirt and shoes will be under $80.

UA faculty, staff and alumni, along with JCPenney team members, will also be standing by with tips and tricks on what to wear to a job interview and even how to tie a tie.

The event will take place at the El Con Shopping Center JCPenney at 3501 E. Broadway after the store closes, so job seekers’ needs will be the only thing on the agenda for the evening. CatTran will be available to shuttle over interested students from 6:15 to 9 p.m.


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Laughing Stock: Set Unlisted is Free 2 for 1 Standup and Improv

Posted By on Thu, Sep 21, 2017 at 8:18 PM

The Titanic comedy team of Leland Long and Matt Ziemak presents Set Unlisted, free, at 8 p.m., Sunday, Sept. 24, at Laff's Comedy Caffe.​ - JEREMY SHOCKLEY
  • Jeremy Shockley
  • The Titanic comedy team of Leland Long and Matt Ziemak presents Set Unlisted, free, at 8 p.m., Sunday, Sept. 24, at Laff's Comedy Caffe.​
As Leland Long was serially abandoning potentially lucrative UA degree programs, he stumbled across his true calling: comedy. Now, he confesses, “I have no money.”

The sacrifice has so far been worth it. His comedy life is well-populated and fun-filled, and the rest of us get to enjoy its output. His latest project, in collaboration with standup comedian Matt Ziemak, is a unique mash up of stand-up and improv: “Set Unlisted.” The show makes its second appearance at Laff’s Comedy Caffe at 8 pm, Sunday, September 24. It’s free, but the club has a two-item minimum.

Set Unlisted, the name, comes from comedians’ common practice of making a “setlist” of their jokes as they warm up for a show. These pre-show setlists can be on bar napkins, in notebooks, on cellphones and often on the palms of a comedian’s hands.

Paper is the setlist medium of choice for Set Unlisted, the show. After each standup set, Long appropriates the setlist, slices it up, and gives its delisted contents to a team of improvisers. The team uses them as prompts for a whole different set of jokes, delivered in improvised scenes. Occasionally, the improvisers find the joke the comedian intended. Since the improv team has been sequestered out of earshot of the standup routine, these congruences can be magical. Only the audience gets them. The joke is on the jokers!

Standup comedians scheduled for Sept. 24 are Rory Monserat, co-host of a weekly open mic at The Loudhouse, Monte Benjamin, the comedian featured in our Aug. 7 column; Nancy Stanley, who organizes the long-standing Estrogen Hour, and several other benefits around Tucson; and Chris Thayer, recently emigrated to Tucson from Los Angeles and featured in our June 15 column.

Long recruited the improvisers from Tucson Improv Movement, where he is a performing member of the company. They are Andrew Hatch of TIM’s premier team The Soapbox, TIM artistic director Daniel Kirby, Esther Brilliant of TIM’s long-running all-female team The Riveters, and geo-scientist Jason Burwell, because improv.

Long says he “fell in love with improv” while watching a friend perform at the UA. He couldn’t make the team, so the friend suggested taking lessons at TIM. The same friend led him into standup comedy. Long says, “Laff’s was the only place I could do standup underage because I could stay in the green room.” That’s where he met Ziemak and they started writing together.

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New TSO Director Kicks Off A New Season

Posted By on Thu, Sep 21, 2017 at 7:15 PM

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Tucson Symphony Orchestra opens its 2016/2017 season with a program designed by new music director José Luis Gomez.

“All of them, in a way, present me to Tucson,” Gomez said. “It’s like a way of saying, ‘hi, this is me.’”

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Quick Bites: Mister Bing, Milkshakes and Mysteries

Posted By and on Thu, Sep 21, 2017 at 1:34 PM

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Mister Bing’s The Supper Club Experience. Hacienda del Sol hosts international entertainers Jesse and Laura Berger and several other musical guests at this Hollywood-style celebration of the Great American Songbook. A swanky cocktail hour is followed by dinner and show. On the menu? Cesar salad to start, roast branzino or braised short rib for the entree and a s’more cake to finish things off. Sure “The Best Things in Life are Free,” but “You and the Night and the Music” and the food will form the perfect quartet, so perhaps it’s best to just “Pick Yourself Up," give into “Temptation,” and head over to Hacienda del Sol. 5 to 8 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 24. Hacienda del Sol, 5501 N. Hacienda Del Sol Road. $75 (plus tax and gratuity).

Flavor by Loews Hotels. Loews Ventana Canyon Resort is now participating in the hotel’s initiative to offer guests lovable local flavors by partnering with the companies behind some of Tucson’s tastiest treats. The hotel will be offering tamales from the Tucson Tamale Company (called “the best tamales in the USA” by Alton Brown of The Food Network), French toast made with bread from Barrio Bread and beer on tap from Dragoon Brewing Company throughout the resort. It’s the perfect place for visiting friends and relatives to stay to get a taste of the city, and many Tusconans will probably now be tempted to stay at the resort themselves. Loews Ventana Canyon Resort, 7000 N. Resort Drive.


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The Weekly List: 21 Things To Do In Tucson In The Next 10 Days

Posted By on Thu, Sep 21, 2017 at 9:30 AM

Your Weekly guide to keeping busy in the Old Pueblo.

Art

Art Now! With Chuck Nanney. Artist Chuck Nanney’s sculptural works from the last three years, which are equal parts minimalist modern and whimsical chic, are showing at MOCA through Oct. 1. For this event, Nanney comes to the museum to talk about his work (which includes sound pieces) nal art lecture format by allowing audiences to engage in discussion about all of the forms that the art of today’s world takes. 6 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 26. MOCA Tucson, 265 S. Church Ave. $10, free for MOCA members.

Diana Madaras Signing Event. It’s hard to believe that calendars for 2018 are already out, but it makes sense, really. After all, 2017 is no spring chicken anymore. Diana Madaras’ 2018 Southwest Art Calendar is out, serving the tri-purpose of helping you keep track of the days, decorate your house and support local art. This week, she’ll even be signing them, so they serve the fourth purpose of showing off your impressive connections in the art world. Also, calendars make fantastic gifts for everyone from your mom to that one coworker you don’t know very well and gave gift cards and lotion to for the past three Christmases. 5 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 21. Madaras Gallery, 3035 N. Swan Road. Free.

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Equinox Poetry Chalking. Chalk, meet poetry. You two should have a lot in common, because you’re both versatile, colorful and good at bringing people together. At this Sam Lena-South Tucson Library event, both will be provided for people of all ages to chalk poems in both English and Spanish celebrating the beginning of fall and the beauty of libraries. Feel free to bring a favorite—or original—poem of your own, and to try out some futuristic glitter chalk, and even spray chalk. 4 to 6 p.m. Friday, Sept. 22. Sam Lena-South Tucson Library 1607 S. Sixth Ave. Free.

Music and Theater

The Astronaut Farmworker. Pima Community College’s run of José Cruz González's play inspired by the story of real-life astronaut José Hernández runs through Oct. 1. In the show, Pepito, the son of migrant farmworkers, is struggling to learn English and make friends in his new home. When he watches Apollo 11 land on the moon, he knew from that day forward that he wanted to be an astronaut. A feel-good story about following your dreams and the power of education, it’s a must-see for kids, parents, grandparents and everyone in between. Friday and Saturday at 7 p.m., Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m. ASL interpreters Friday, Sept. 29 at 7 p.m. Scout Theatre Adventure (for girl and boy scouts and their leaders at a discounted price). Saturday, Sept. 23 at 7 p.m. Through Oct. 1. Proscenium Theatre, 2202 W. Anklam Road. $8 (or $6 for groups of 10 or more)


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Wednesday, September 20, 2017

New TV Ad Asks McCain To Stop Latest GOP Healthcare Disaster

Posted By on Wed, Sep 20, 2017 at 4:00 PM


Sen. John McCain provided the critical vote to block the so-called "skinny repeal" legislation that ended the summer chapter of Obamacare repeal, so supporters of the Affordable Care Act hope that he'll do the same with the Graham-Cassidy legislation that senators hope to pass by Sept. 30, when the reconciliation clock runs out for the fiscal year, along with the power to pass the healthcare legislation with just 51 votes.

McCain hasn't yet said that he'll support the legislation, but opponents of it worry that his close friendship with Graham may sway his vote in favor of the bill, which would essentially take the money that the federal government now spend on Obamacare and send it all to the states, allowing the 50 state legislatures to figure out how to best spend it. It would also allows waivers of essential health benefits, protections for people with pre-existing conditions and other federal regulations designed to protect ordinary Americans with help problems.

Meanwhile, Save Our Care is highlighting a new study that shows the proposed legislation would cost Arizona a staggering $133 billion by 2036:

A new study from Avalere Health released today estimates that the Graham-Cassidy health care repeal bill will lead to a reduction in federal funding to states of more than $4 trillion nationwide by 2036.

Arizona alone would lose $133 billion. This is the latest analysis to confirm that the Graham-Cassidy plan is the worst repeal bill yet, stripping health coverage from 32 million Americans and raising premiums by 20 percent next year. According to another study, by the Center for American progress, 511,000 Arizonans would lose health coverage.

The bill would be devastating for Arizonans. According to Avalere Health, Arizona would lose $19 billion over the next decade, and then would continue to lose even more federal funding over the following two decades. By 2036, the repeal bill would cost Arizona $133 billion in federal funding that is needed to support those on Medicaid and to provide tax credits to help Arizonans pay for their health care.

Despite these alarming estimations and overwhelming calls for bipartisan solutions, Senate Republicans are still pushing forward this disastrous health care repeal bill and are expected to vote as soon as next week.

A Little Late To the 'Patriotically Correct' Party

Posted By on Wed, Sep 20, 2017 at 2:00 PM

COURTESY OF BIGSTOCK
  • Courtesy of Bigstock
For some reason, I woke up this morning thinking about the conservative crusade against the  Political Correctness. Then I thought about how conservatives go nuts over ideas and actions they don't think are "American" and jingoistic enough. Same idea, different targets. So I asked myself, "What can I call the conservative version of political correctness? Can I come up with a two word phrase with the initials 'P.C.'? . . . I got it! Patriotic Correctness."

If a football player takes a knee during the National Anthem, conservatives go crazy, because he's not showing the proper respect for the country. "How unpatriotic!" Could it be he thinks it's patriotic to point out problems which should be fixed to make this a better country by making a quiet, peaceful statement? "No way! You show patriotism by standing and waiting for the National Anthem to be over so the damn game can start already." People protesting the Iraq War were labeled traitors. "Why do you hate America?" conservatives screamed. And when the Dixie Chicks made a disparaging comment about President George Bush during a concert in London, their records were burned, their music was banished from country music station playlists and they got death threats. All in the name of Patriotic Correctness.

Before I congratulated myself for my creative genius, I decided to google "patriotic correctness." I found a column in the Washington Post dated Dec. 7, 2016. The writer stole my idea nine months before I thought of it.
But conservatives have their own, nationalist version of PC, their own set of rules regulating speech, behavior and acceptable opinions. I call it “patriotic correctness.” It’s a full-throated, un-nuanced, uncompromising defense of American nationalism, history and cherry-picked ideals. Central to its thesis is the belief that nothing in America can’t be fixed by more patriotism enforced by public shaming, boycotts and policies to cut out foreign and non-American influences.

Conservatives use “patriotic correctness” to regulate speech, behavior and acceptable opinions. Insufficient displays of patriotism among the patriotically correct can result in exclusion from public life and ruined careers. It also restricts honest criticism of failed public policies, diverting blame for things like the war in Iraq to those Americans who didn’t support the war effort enough.

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Casa Video Top 10

Posted By on Wed, Sep 20, 2017 at 1:00 PM

There's always plenty of events going on around town if you're looking to go out. With fall just around the corner, a night in with a movie just might be more appealing. It's just the right time of year where all the films of the summer are now available to watch from the comfort of your home.

So after a long day, or even when you come home from the Santa Cruz County Fair or Greek Fest this weekend, catch up with one of summer's films people have been talking about.

This is your Weekly Casa Video Top 10:


1. The Mummy

2. Rough Night

3. It Comes at Night

4. Beatriz at Dinner

5. It

6. Snatched

7. Baywatch

8. Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2

9. All Eyez on Me

10. Alien Covenant

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Staff Pick

James G. Davis (1931-2016): Down at the Tower Bar, A Retrospective

Celebrating the career of Tucson artist James G. Davis with a selection of paintings and prints made… More

@ Etherton Gallery Sat., Sept. 9, 7-10 p.m. and Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Nov. 11 135 S. Sixth Ave.

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Popular Content

  1. The Weekly List: 21 Things To Do In Tucson In The Next 10 Days (The Range: The Tucson Weekly's Daily Dispatch)
  2. New TV Ad Asks McCain To Stop Latest GOP Healthcare Disaster (The Range: The Tucson Weekly's Daily Dispatch)
  3. Wildcats Can Suit Up And Save (The Range: The Tucson Weekly's Daily Dispatch)
  4. A Little Late To the 'Patriotically Correct' Party (The Range: The Tucson Weekly's Daily Dispatch)
  5. New TSO Director Kicks Off A New Season (The Range: The Tucson Weekly's Daily Dispatch)

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