XOXO: Mark Your Calenders

Thursday, Jan. 13 

From the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, Green Buddha’s signature “No Coast” reggae sound is an olio of funky reggae, rock and soul, dub and ska, with a ladleful of piquant Creole flavor. Green Buddha play tracks from Small Town (2018), their debut album. At Chicago Bar. With an opening set by singer-songwriter Randy Vega

Backed by bassist Thøger Lund, drummer Casey Hadland, and Ben Nisbet on guitar, plus special guest Stephen Dorocke (Handsome Family) on lap steel, Parisian guitarist magnifiqué
Naïm Amor presents a concert featuring original material from his forthcoming album. At Hotel Congress (plaza)…

Joe Novelli & the Cloud Walls—Gabe Sullivan on drums and bassist Geoff Hidalgo—perform swampy, blues influenced, slide guitar-driven Americana and rock ’n’ roll. Live & free. At Tap & Bottle (downtown)…

Friday, Jan. 14

With the banks of the Missouri River as stomping grounds, like many young guitarists coming of age during the British Invasion of the mid-1960s, Dave Stryker started out lifting riffs off of Beatles and Cream records. All that would change after hearing John Coltrane’s watershed album My Favorite Things. Soon, his burgeoning love affair with jazz would lead to sifting through stacks of vinyl by Wes Montgomery, Kenny Burrell, and Miles Davis, intoxicated by their improvisational prowess. A formidable jazz guitarist with strong blues and soul inflections, Stryker has worked as both a sideman—with the likes of Jack McDuff, Stanley Turrentine and others—and bandleader. Breaking new ground, Stryker’s latest solo release, As We Are (2022), pivoting on the interplay with a string quartet, highlights his talents as composer. Stryker expands, “I always wanted to do something where strings would really be integrated into the music, not a coloring or sweetening that comes later.” The Dave Stryker Quartet and The Eric Alexander Quintet pair for a concert featuring the TJF String Orchestra. At Fox Tucson Theatre…

Following a thread that is woven throughout her eight-album discography, singer-songwriter Katie Haverly is questioning what it means to be human. Exploring the meaning of purpose through her unique cocktail of folk and jazz-tinged pop. A self-described “jazzy mystic,” Haverly says her writing process is closely tied to the spiritual realm, and has grown to be one of “receiving energy from and living in communion with the beyond.”
Katie Haverly performs material from Matter (2020), her latest release. At 191 Toole. With Jillian Bessett and Female Gaze

The stuff of legend, Tucson’s latin dance party sin fronteras El Tambó celebrates the cultural remezcla deep-rooted in the borderlands.
DJ Humblelianess presides. At Hotel Congress (plaza stage)…

Since forming in 2016, this Tempe trio have released scads of testosterone-fueled singles detailing “teen angst and punk-style anthems delivered through hip-hop sonics.”
Belaganas share the stage with LA’s No Suits. At Club Congress…

Saturday, Jan. 15 

In a collaborative project between French chanteuse Cyrille Aimée, band leader/drummer Adonis Rose & New Orleans Jazz Orchestra’s NOJO 7 septet, Petite Fleur (2021)—an instrumental written by soprano saxophonist Sidney Bechet in 1952—tells the rich multicultural history and musical love story that blossomed between France and New Orleans, a city founded by Jean Baptiste Le Moyne in 1718 as the thriving capital of then New France for King Louis XV. Not unlike a “little flower,” a symbol of love and beauty flourishing, for Aimée music is “more of a human adventure than a musical vocation that has made me want to devote my life to its practice.” At Fox Tucson Theatre. With Kendrick Scott and Tucson Jazz Institute’s Ellington Big Band

Utilizing only a double-neck bass/guitar, a drum kit and looping pedals, post-rock duo El Eleven Ten create complex, deeply emotional layers of sound that at once pulse with beauty and charge hard like a locomotive. At 191 Toole. With Sego… Red-hot jazz improv bursts into flame—national and local professionals trade fours—on multiple stages. The Grover Quartet headlines TJF Jazz Jam.  At Hotel Congress…

Celebrate the first night of Dillinger Days.
Kings of Pleasure kick things off with a pre-party. At Hotel Congress…

Sunday, Jan. 16 

By the time guitarist Lee Ritenour was 16, he had already played on his first session with the Mamas and Papas. Shortly thereafter, he began performing with Tony Bennett and Lena Horne, at the age of 17. Earning the nickname “Captain Fingers,” as word of this then man-child’s preternatural chops spread. And that is just the intro to an expansive story. Longtime collaborator and pianist Dave Grusin has worked in the music industry since the late 1950s. As a film composer, Grusin’s oeuvre stands as one of the most recognizable in cinema. Since the late ’60s, he’s scored more than 75 films, including The Graduate, Tootsie, The Fabulous Baker Boys, Heaven Can Wait and On Golden Pond. Accolades aside, Ritenour and Grusin’s collaboration goes back to the storied LA jazz club The Baked Potato during the 1970s. There in this pint-sized venue, you could find the duo jamming on Tuesday nights, while the likes of Joni Mitchell, Bob Dylan, Al Jarreau, Eric Clapton, and a showy flock of others comprised the audience. Lee Ritenour & Dave Grusin reunite once again. At Fox Tucson Theatre…

From Magnolia, Texas, childhood friends Zach Chance and Jonathan Clay write songs about everyday life. Blending dulcet harmony vocals that spring from Americana, Southern country, Western rock roots. Young Man (2022) is a nostalgic gaze by not-so-young men reminiscing about their lost youth. On “Moving Man,” they sing, “I never thought a minute would be this hard to hold. Even though my papa told me, ‘Son you look up, and you’re old.’” Jamestown Revival. At Rialto Theater. With Mipso and Robert Ellis

Dillinger Days. Prison Band, Mr. Boogie Woogie and the Desert Melodies provide the soundtrack. At Hotel Congress…

Monday, Jan. 17 

The plain-spoken honesty conveyed in singer-songwriter John Moreland’s world-weary lyrics can astound and sting. “I can’t dress myself up and be some folk singer character that I’m not,” Moreland says. “All I can do is be me.” John Moreland helps to heal “Old Wounds.” At 191 Toole. With S.G. Goodman

A drummer whose time is now. The New York Times says, “Kendrick Scott invests seriously in the ancient ideal of music as a healing force.” Created to explore a narrative, on A Wall Becomes A Bridge (2019) Scott adapts the admixture (representing the role of the turntable as instrument) with the addition of turntablist Jahi Sundance to the lineup. In a statement Scott lays out his vision: “Walls are easier to build than bridges. We are often quicker to stack bricks built of fear than we are to weave a cable of empathy and reach across a divide. My life’s purpose is to become an instrument of peace.” Drummer/composer Kendrick Scott headlines the Downtown Jazz Fiesta. Featuring the UA Fred Fox Jazz Ensemble. At Hotel Congress (plaza stage)…

Tuesday, Jan. 18

In short, Sammy Rae & The Friends—a horn-driven, eight-piece collective of musicians, dreamers, and artists—is a musical family Rae piecemealed together over years of scouting buskers on subway landings and attending gigs. “Our shows are safe spaces for you to do your thing; raise your voice, wear your funky clothes, and dance how you like. We don’t have fans, we have friends.” Euphoric jazz-rockers Sammy Rae & The Friends gives audiences a taste of The Good Life. At 191 Toole. With Joe Hertler and The Rainbow Seekers

Wednesday, Jan. 19

Cross-pollinating the names of two vintage guitar amplifiers to arrive at its title, Electro Melodier (2021) is Son Volt’s 10th album. Veering only slightly from 2019’s politically charged Union, principal songwriter Jay Farrar stares soberly at the present state of American discord, while cradling ghosts from its forgotten past. “Livin’ in the U.S.A.”—“Farrar’s version of Neil Young’s ‘Rockin’ in the Free World’”— is a song of social protest that references the Black Lives Matter movement (when the people took to the streets demanding justice) and takes swipes at the fossil fuel industry, governmental corruption and the broken promise of the American Dream. Son Volt. With Jesse Farrar. At 191 Toole…

In an interview with Revolver, Matt Stephenson defined Brooklyn’s Machine Girl as “fucked-up electronic punk,” although they don’t like being tagged as industrial. Smashing together bits of jungle, drum and bass, digital hardcore, and rave, equally apocalyptic and ecstatic, Machine Girl bring their latest release, U-Void Synthesizer (2020). At Club Congress. With Johnnascus and GNAR

Thursday, Jan. 20 

Spanish Harlem Orchestra is dedicated to bruiting the sounds that pervade El Barrio, a pulsating NYC community that gave rise to boogaloo, Latin soul, and salsa. Born in the streets, this rich musical legacy is deeply ingrained in the ensemble’s identity. Coming at you full force, three-time Grammy winners Spanish Harlem Orchestra celebrate Un Gran Dia En El Barrio. At Rialto Theater…

After unceremoniously announcing the band’s imminent demise in 2003, post-hardcore/alternative rockers Shiner, apparently, have reconsidered and return with
Schadenfreude (2020), their first studio album since 2001’s The Egg. Like the album title suggests, Shiner derive pleasure from another person’s misfortune. At Rialto Theater…

Pushing boundaries, electronic synth duo
Boy Harsher’s fifth release isn’t really a traditional album. But rather, a soundtrack to a short horror film. Balancing cinematic instrumentals with pop songs, Boy Harsher presents The Runner (2022). At Club Congress…

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