XOXO: Mark Your Calendars

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Jack White performs at The Linda Ronstadt Music Hall on Friday, Sept. 30.

Thursday, Sept. 29

Since
Hed PE’s inception in Southern California circa 1994 mashing together gangsta-rap and punk rock, the act has spanned many subjects in its lyrics, including social justice, extraterrestrial life, criticism of organized religion, the 9/11 Truth movement, cannabis and sex, of course. Founding member Jared Gomes reflected on “Califas Worldwide,” the band’s 12th studio album. “When the first phase of the pandemic hit, rather than sit around, I decided to channel my energy, creating music and working with new artists.” Artists from Belarus, Russia, England, France, Argentina, Italy and Germany sent in tracks. “When finished I realized there were some really cool vibes here.” The record label agreed. “So, the album title was a way of tying together all the tracks from all over the world with my Cali vibes.” Hed PE offers a taste of “G-punk” at The Rock… In his salad days as an independent artist, country singer Kenny Feidler started out selling CDs from the trunk of a beaten Cadillac. Now, Kenny Feidler and The Cowboy Killers — a raw mix of brooding cowboy songs backed by a grungy rock ‘n’ roll band — accumulate hundreds of thousands of monthly streams and tour nationally. Kenny Feidler and The Cowboy Killers — with backing from The Cole Trains — stay true to their roots at The Maverick…

Drummer/producer
Pete Swan’s Thursday night series continues. This week Swan introduces a new assemblage comprised of fine Tucson jazzmen: Keyboardist Richard Katz, saxophonist Gary Love, double-bassist Evan Arredondo and Swan on drums. They make their debut at The Century Room…

Venice Beach thrash metal trio Ottto features bassist Tye Trujillo, son of Metallica’s Robert Trujillo. Although not always easy to follow in the footsteps of giants, frontman Bryan Noah Ferretti said, “He’s really keen on just letting us do our thing. He knows it’s our band and really encourages us to own that.”
Ottto — in lockstep with Tucson punks Soakset — crank out loco grooves at Club Congress…

Friday, Sept. 30 

Born John Anthony Gillis in Detroit — aka Jack White — the youngest of 10 children, was raised Catholic and became an altar boy. White’s earliest musical influences were his older brothers who played in a band. He began playing the drums in the first grade after finding a kit abandoned in the attic. But his young life could have taken a very different turn. “I’d got accepted to a seminary in Wisconsin, and I was going to become a priest,” he told “60 Minutes” in 2005. “But at the last second, I thought, ‘I’ll just go to public school.’ I had just gotten a new amplifier in my bedroom and I didn’t think I was allowed to take it with me.” Years later, after enjoying consistent critical and popular success with The White Stripes, Raconteurs and The Dead Weather, in 2012, the New York Times lauded White as “The coolest, weirdest and savviest rock star of our time.” Unafraid to take a bold stance, upon learning that Donald Trump, then presidential candidate, was using the White Stripes’ “Seven Nation Army” in a campaign video, White denounced Trump and began selling T-shirts reading “Icky Trump” — a play on the White Stripes’ “Icky Thump.” Now, on the heels of “Entering Heaven Alive,” his sixth solo album, like “A Tree on Fire from Within,” White brings The Supply Chain Issues Tour to The Linda Ronstadt Music Hall. Rock ‘n’ roll revivalists Ichi-Bons open the show…

Apocalyptica — a Finnish cello quartet of neoclassical deconstructionists — formed in 1993, at the Sibelius Academy in Helsinki. Then, a mere clique of heavy metal enthusiasts who, when not enmeshed studying classical music, would gather to jam on Metallica covers. Like the character played by Joseph Gordon-Levitt in “Hesher” — loosely modeled after Metallica’s deceased bassist Cliff Burton — the members of Apocalyptica embody a convulsion of anarchy. Despite renditions of Metallica songs being the quartet’s initial draw, as composers they are masterful in their own right. In search of new frontiers, “Cell-0,” their ninth studio album revolves around the concept of a “God particle.” “Millions of notes combine to create music just as millions of cells combine to create life, and when you visualize the whole thing, similar patterns appear.” Traveling deeper into the universe of instrumental music, Apocalyptica returns to the Rialto Theatre…

Known for its sentimental ranchera-style ballads and powerful brass-laden big banda sound, Banda MS has risen to become one of the most influential Latin musical groups. In support of its latest all-acoustic album “Positivo: Versión Acústica,” Banda MS brings the sound of Mazatlán, Sinaloa to the AVA Amphitheater…

According to Forbes, Chris Daughtry is one of the top-grossing “American Idol” alums, after Carrie Underwood and Kelly Clarkson. Now performing as a band, Daughtry’s faith-friendly songs like “Home” have helped them reach mainstream and Christian audiences. Continuing an upward trajectory, in September 2021 Daughtry released “Dearly Beloved,” its sixth studio album, with plans for a tour in the works. Everything was shelved, however, when tragedy befell. The singer lost his stepdaughter Hannah to suicide in November 2021, followed by his mother to cancer after a lengthy battle, exactly one week later. “Heavy is the Crown,” Daughtry usher “The Dearly Beloved Tour” to the Desert Diamond…

On a mission to tell stories from the fringes, Boiler Room started with a webcam taped to a wall, in 2010, opening a keyhole into London’s underground scene. Showcasing a new wave of emerging artists, Riobamba, Stoneypie, Sonido Tambó and Los Esplifs christen Boiler Room X — a collaborative U.S. tour with the of connecting local dance floors to the wider world — on the plaza at Hotel Congress…

While attending the Manhattan School of Music, violinist Heather Hardy used to perform on subway platforms embarking on a lifelong journey of experimentation to develop a unique voice on her instrument. Cross-pollinating genres seamlessly, Heather Hardy & A Taste of Jazz perform two sets at The Century Room… Pür000 is a sonic exploration of musical icons from the 2000s mashed together with hard techno beats. Sonic alchemist/DJ/producer Zpheen reimagines and remixes an era at 191 Toole…

Transplanted to the desert Southwest from the Ivory Coast, international African roots reggae artist General Tchefary’s message traverses international borders and all aspects of humanity. “Music sends a message in every song,” he said. Mixing traditional African melodies with Jamaican reggae rhythms, General Tchefary proffers “Jah is Love,” his full-length album release, at Chicago Bar…

Spinning sounds from the underground, DJ Mijito hosts Queer Goth Night — with a drag performance by Vendetta Vixen — at The Royal Room… Let’s get it right this time, shall we? Prom Night 2: Electric Feel Good provides an opportunity to relive the bittersweet days of high school, this time with much cooler music, a drag show, costume contest and state-of-the-art visuals by InRave. EDM DJs Atom Energy, Dmoticon, NRG, Sora Morbid, Quin Flow, Chris Tiano soundtrack this “formal” affair at The Rock… 

Saturday, Oct. 1

In 1971, Bonnie Lynn Raitt released her self-titled debut album. In the years that followed, the blues/roots singer/guitarist went on to release 18 studio albums, picking up 12 Grammys along the way and culminating with an induction into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 2000. Not a bad run. Raitt’s sole companion through the highest of highs and the lowest of lows — which included years of alcohol and substance abuse and ultimately recovery — “Brownie,” an unpainted 1965 Fender Stratocaster, which she has used for every gig since 1969. Known for her lifelong commitment to social and political activism, Raitt is inspired by her Quaker roots and family ties to the American Friends Service Committee to lend her voice for social justice, equality, compassion for the suffering and protection of the air we breathe and the water we drink. She has performed concerts around oil, nuclear power, mining, water and forest protection since the mid-’70s. Returning to the stage with music from her new album, “Just Like That…,” Bonnie Raitt performs at The Linda Ronstadt Music Hall, with special guest Marc Cohn

With songs ranging from boleros to Peruvian waltzes — accompanied by tango dancers, a violinist, classical guitarists, ballet folklórico and mariachi — singer/pianist/composer Carlos Zapién presents “Canto Latino: An evening of traditional songs, music and dance from Latin America” at Leo Rich Theater…

Making outsider music that is as thought provoking as it is hard hitting, Drug Church is a contradiction. “But Does It Work?” Their sound is a frenzied mix of punk energy and ’90s alt-rock melodicism, half sung, half shouted by frontman Patrick Kindlon. Inhabiting the darkest corners of the human psyche, Drug Church loudly put forward “uncomfortable truths.” Now, on its fourth LP, “Hygiene,” the band insolently doubles down. Drug Church at 191 Toole. Bite The Hand opens…

Forerunners of the Riot Grrrl movement — active opposers of nuclear testing and the right-wing agenda — Burning Bush was a Phoenix all-female power trio active from 1987 to 1993. Returning to the stage after a long hiatus, Burning Bush — along with Fat Gray Cat and Yvonne Champagne — embark on the “7 Year Itch Arizona Tour.” They make a stop at Club Congress…

Last Night’s Makeup presents “My Friends Over You: An emo, punk and indie dance party.” DJs Alice.km and NGHTFVR create a vibe at The Jackrabbit Lounge…

Acclaimed jazz pianist Cynthia Hilts performs solo for happy hour in The Century Room… Specializing in the music of the Benny Goodman Sextet — featuring early electric guitar hero, Charlie Christian — “Tucson’s ambassadors of the Swing Era,” The Wholly Cats Swing Club celebrate the release of “Jumpin’ and Jivin’” on the plaza at Hotel Congress…

Despite a career punctuated by controversy — a dispute with Trap Veterans over a sample on a collab with the Suicideboys, a Twitter post of a fan performing fellatio in a Las Vegas hotel room the photo of which was made into a T-shirt and sold on his Trippy Burger website, followed by a Twitter rant disparaging local acts and how they are “potentially ruining the full tour experience” — EDM DJ/producer Tanner Petulla, aka Getter, rose to fame with his heavy dubstep style. In 2019, following the release of “Visceral” — his debut album in which he experimented adding new colors to his sonic palette — Petulla canceled his tour early and called it quits. “Imagine working toward something...that you feel could finally separate you from the rest...all to just get yelled at, booed and have shit thrown at you because it’s not the cookie-cutter bullshit they are used to.” Petulla’s announcement resounded throughout the music community. DJs and fans reached out, offering their support. Getter returns to drop “Napalm,” his latest LP, at Encore… The artful, jazz guitar-driven sounds of the Matt Mitchell Quartet usher the descent into the dead of the Late Night at The Century Room… 

Sunday, Oct. 2

Barely out of high school when they debuted with 2006’s “I’m Like a Virgin Losing a Child” — with songs centered around deeply personal, seemingly confessional lyrics and a compelling Southern gothic post-hardcore rock sound, the brain trust of childhood friends and primary songwriters singer/guitarist Andy Hull and guitarist/keyboardist Robert McDowell — Manchester Orchestra’s star began to ascend. See related story about their show at the Rialto Theatre…

One of Italy’s finest exponents of blues music, and ostensibly a musical ambassador — he was the first western artist to play at the Kremlin after the Berlin Wall fell — Zucchero Fornaciari has sung on five continents, in 69 countries and 628 cities. Zucchero proudly took part in “46664, a series of AIDS benefit concerts played in honor of Nelson Mandela by South African and foreign musicians between 2003 and 2008. Now, The World Wild Tour brings Italian singer-songwriter, “The father of Italian blues,” Fornaciari to the Fox Tucson Theatre…

With a penchant for sonic exploration, San Diego indie-pop trio Sitting on Stacy serves up a slice of “Apple Pie” at Club Congress. Jakob Nowell opens the show…

Rooted in blues and early rock ‘n’ roll, Rumble King formed in southern California in 1996. The band’s rollicking upright piano and saxophone-driven sound, together with their unconventional approach — as one of the few combos performing on the blues circuit without a guitar — soon found a place during the rockabilly and swing revival of the late ‘90s. In 2019, a quarter of a century after their initial meeting, Rumble King welcomed The 44’s guitarist Johnny Main as an official member. Rumble King present “They Don’t,” its new EP, at Monterey Court… Rooted in Chicago blues — a raucous electrified sound based on earlier blues idioms, such as Delta blues — Whose Blues adds a distinct spice into the mix for the Congress Cookout on the Hotel Congress plaza…

A musical wunderkind, equally adept at performing on both brass and woodwinds, composer and multi-instrumentalist Max Goldschmid hosts the Jazz Jam Session at The Century Room… 

 Monday, Oct. 3

The origin story behind “This is a Photograph,” Kevin Morby’s seventh studio album, begins in his childhood home in Kansas City after his father collapsed at a family dinner and was rushed to the hospital. Later, as existential fear still coursed through his bones — absentmindedly flipping through a box of old family photos — he meditated, conflicting thoughts churning together. As his father began to regain strength, Morby headed to Memphis and checked into the historic Peabody Hotel. It was there — with just a guitar and microphone on a makeshift recording setup — while confronting his own fear of death, that the outpouring of songs that would eventually comprise his latest album began to coalesce. The singer-songwriter performs at 191 Toole. Ambient folk-pop artist Cassandra Jenkins opens the show…

Rolling Stone describes 25-year-old Madison Cunningham’s music as “a new spin on West Coast folk-rock, with classical tendencies, electric guitars, jazz-school chord changes and alt-rock strut all living under the same roof.” Two-time Grammy-nominated artist Madison Cunningham presents “Revealer,” her sophomore release, at Club Congress… 

Tuesday, Oct. 4 

Smashing together jazz, Afro-Cuban rhythms, funk with EDM and house music, drummer King of Sludge branded the band after recognizing that no existing musical genre could possibly accommodate their utterly unique sound; brasshouse was coined. “Brasshouse is a high energy musical conversation,” trumpeter Matt Doe insists. Born in the subways of New York City, Too Many Zooz is a busking phenomenon. They exploded in 2014 when a video of one of their performances, shot by a passer-by at the Union Square station, went viral. “I don’t really care about what’s happening in music. I just make art that I enjoy making,” stated King of Sludge. It’s this attitude of indifference to trend that has garnered Too Many Zooz a “fanatical” fanbase. See for yourself. Too Many Zooz is at 191 Toole. Cameron Greaves opens…

Batushka is an enigmatic Polish black metal band. Inspired by the Eastern Orthodox Church, their lyrics are written in Old Church Slavonic — the first Slavic literary language standardized by 9th century Byzantine missionaries to translate the bible. Band members wear hooded habits and Eastern Orthodox schemas during performances to conceal their identities and deepen the mystery. The North American Pilgrimage Tour brings Batushka — along with Hate, Hideous Divinity and Swarm of Serpents — to The Rock…

Equal parts Iggy Pop and Hank Williams, the Viagra Boys are a Swedish post-punk band who churn out spastic PTSD disco and bass-driven absurdum with a sense of dark humor. Viagra Boys and Shame join forces at Club Congress… 

Wednesday, Oct. 5 

Inspired by the rock gods that came before — Led Zeppelin, Aerosmith and Guns n’ Roses — for the Los Angeles’ Dirty Honey, success came right out of the gate. Their debut single, “When I’m Gone” — bluesy, nasty rock ‘n’ roll, brimming with frontman Marc LaBelle’s sexy swagger and guitarist John Notto’s wicked ’70s-inspired rock riffs — became the first song by an unsigned band to rocket to No. 1 on Billboard’s rock chart. Although, they may not be the saviors of rock ‘n’ roll. They certainly are next to carry the well-worn torch. Dirty Honey is at the Rialto Theatre. Dorothy and Mac Saturn lend support…

Hailed by Eric Clapton as “a genius,” since first appearing on the NYC music scene in 1991, guitarist Kurt Rosenwinkel has gained international recognition for his artistry. The Kurt Rosenwinkel Quartet performs two sets at The Century Room…

An insightful and prolific Canadian singer-songwriter — whose music mirrors Nashville’s countrypolitan and 1960s psych-rock eras — after a hiatus Daniel Romano returns with “La Luna” — an expansive two-song album that clocks in at 33 minutes. Daniel Romano’s Outfit — with guest Carson McHone — is at Club Congress…

Adept at playing the role of beer-sodden teenagers even as they’ve grown into haggard middle-aged men, The Queers are a punk rock band from New Hampshire who’ve been delivering fast, loud and snotty music since the early 1980s. Never far from controversy, frontman Joe King — aka Joe Queer — rationalizes some of his more contentious opinions over the years. In a 2017 interview, King stated, “I get called a Nazi and racist because of our name, and then because I had an opinion about the Ferguson thing,” he said. “I’m liberal as hell, and I was taken aback by how quickly people attacked me. To this day, I’ll get snide comments. I was jumped by Nazis as a ‘gay’ person, even though I’m not gay. I fought Nazis, so to be called a Nazi is lame by this alt-left.” Teeming with cavity causing early bubble-gum pop covers, The Queers bring “Reverberation,” its latest LP, to 191 Toole. Venomous Pinks and Mercy Music open the show… 

Until next week, XOXO…

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