XOXO: Mark Your Calendars

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Shakey Graves performs at Rialto Theater with Nigerian-Greek singer-songwriter Abraham Alexander on Tuesday, Aug. 16.

Thursday, Aug. 11

Owing largely to the strength of their live show — a sweat-drenched spectacle that taps into everything from Southern rock and stoner metal to Latin hip-hop and musica norteña — Giovannie and the Hired Guns have racked up millions of streams primarily through word-of-mouth. Front man Giovannie Yanez describes his band, “Some of our songs are pure fun. And some will hit you in the gut and make you cry. It all depends on what is in my heart at that moment.” Giovannie and the Hired Guns at 191 Toole. Drew Cooper presents his unique brand of workingman’s Americana first up on stage…

Hailing from the Lower 9th Ward — a place that still bears the indelible cicatrices of Hurricane Katrina’s fury — this trumpeter/vocalist and his ace band are the embodiment of New Orleans. Stepping up on the front-line, Shamarr Allen & The Underdawgs’ fiery concoction of jazz and hip-hop, funk and blues, rock and country keep the party lit all night long at Hotel Congress Plaza…

Friday, Aug. 12

Influenced by Celtic, bluegrass and old-time music, Matt Rolland and Rebekah Sandoval Rolland comprise the husband-and-wife acoustic duo RISO. Matt’s nimble melodic lines — chops honed as a contest fiddler — coupled with Rebekah’s speech-driven, “crooked” rhythms and evocative phrasing create a compelling push/pull dynamic. This interplay is in full effect on “New Eyes.” Like a caterpillar becoming a butterfly, the duo’s latest album transmogrifies centuries old traditions into something new. In the studio the Rolland’s enlisted the help of several notables: drummer Arthur Vint, guitarist Ryan David Green, keyboardist Steff Koeppen, bassist Thøger Lund, violinist Ben Plotnick and cellist Kaitlyn Raitz. With a repertoire of songs capable of breaking one’s heart and mending it anew, RISO fête the release of “New Eyes” with “a slice of folk perfection” at 191 Toole. Singer-songwriter Ryan David Green of Ryanhood kicks off the shindig…

Led by pianist Dr. Angelo Versace — director of jazz studies at the UA — the Angelo Versace Trio pay homage to the late, great pianist Mulgrew Miller. They perform Miller’s compositions and arrangements in a special program, One For ‘Grew, at The Century Room… During the heady days of the mid-1990s, Memphis rap pioneer King Skinny Pimp never quite matched the success of his peers: 8ball & MJG, Three 6 Mafia and Tela. “I feel like I’m the dopest MC that’s unknown.” Pimp said. Despite that, he is now enjoying a resurgence thanks in part to TikTok. Songs sampling Kingpin Skinny Pimp’s oeuvre have been igniting into flame around the world. Kingpin Skinny Pimp brings “Spider,” his latest full-length album, to the Club Congress stage. Get A Grip, Psypiritual and Sex Prisoner share the bill…

Saturday, Aug. 13

Most musicians won’t hit the road without a travel comfort item or two — an eye mask for sleeping, a neck pillow, and a pair of noise-canceling headphones. When country music superstar Brad Paisley announced that he was embarking on World Tour 2022, he already had something special in mind. Paisley will travel coast-to-coast with a semi-truck carrying 90 barrels of bourbon — his American Highway Reserve, a Kentucky whiskey aged in barrels that roll along with the country singer tossing and turning on the open road. It’s a method not unlike liquors aged centuries ago on boats at sea. “Plus, a little live music doesn’t hurt, either,” Paisley adds. Truly a “Whiskey Lullaby.” Paisley rides his steel horse, and a few barrels of bourbon, into the AVA Amphitheater…

John Moreland said his new album, “Birds in the Ceiling,” captures the thoughts and sounds swimming around in his head. “I think most of the album lyrically is about alienation and isolation,” he said. “Colored through this terrifying, dystopian lens.” Like “Cheap Idols Dressed in Expensive Garbage,” a song Moreland wrote after a friend introduced him to a social media account that highlights pastors wearing designer clothes, while parishioners toil. “It feels like things just continue to get harder for working people,” he said, contemplatively. “It’s hard to afford life these days.” Moreland breaks hearts sweetly at 191 Toole. S.G. Goodman opens the show…

Steve Von Till dreams of trees. He has made a life’s work out of seeking the elemental. On “A Deep Voiceless Wilderness” — an achingly beautiful work with ambient, neo-classical leanings — Von Till ruminates on our disconnect from the natural world, each other, and ultimately ourselves. “This is how I originally heard this piece of music,” he said. “Without the voice as an anchor or earthbound narrative. These pieces have a broader wingspan.” They allow the listener to imagine their own story. Musician/poet Von Till shares the Club Congress stage with Chicago-based rock cellist/composer Helen Money… Baptized in mezcal, Los Nawdy Dawgs serve “south of the border, Pulp Fiction-esque, Latin blues-rock,” having gotten their start playing raunchy strip clubs in the redlight district of Nogales, Sonora. Los Nawdy Dawgs provide the musical soundtrack for Dia de las Luchas while Spandex-clad luchadores grapple at the Rialto Theater…

KMKR 99.9 FM presents Kulululu, Piramides, DimitriAM and BugClub performing an outdoor benefit concert to help raise funds to upgrade the sound system and facilities for the Scott J. Kerr Memorial Stage at Steinfeld Warehouse Community Arts Center…

Sunday, Aug. 14

In 2001, after landing two tracks on the blockbuster “The Fast and the Furious” motion picture soundtrack — with singles “Click Click Boom” and “Superstar” receiving significant airplay on rock radio — Tennessee’s Saliva was propelled into mainstream popularity. The Grammy-nominated nu metallists return talking “Some Sh*t About Love,” off their most recent studio album, “10 Lives.” They make a stop at The Rock. Local pop punks Hell Doubt and hard rockers Cranberry Suit help to raise some dust…

Now years in development, “The Mariachi Miracle” is the passion project of filmmaker Daniel Buckley. It is a thoroughly American story with a Mexican sound. “It’s the best story that I am ever going to get to tell, bar none,” Buckley offered without hesitation. “Wherever there are farm workers there are mariachi programs to help lift those families out of poverty and give a new trajectory in life. That’s what ‘The Mariachi Miracle’ is about.” A tireless advocate for the Mexican-American community, Buckley reflects, “If I were to die tomorrow, the Mariachi community would know that they did something truly transformational for their community, their state and their country.” Something truly miraculous. A sneak peek preview of Buckley’s long-awaited documentary film “The Mariachi Miracle” will be screened — along with live performances by some of the best young mariachi and folklórico performers in Tucson today — at the Fox Tucson Theatre…

A hurricane is coming your way. Featuring saxophonist “Hurricane” Carla Brownlee and Arizona Blues Hall of Famer Mike Blommer on guitar, Tucson blues institution Bad News Blues make landfall at Hotel Congress Plaza for the latest installment of the Congress Cookout…

Led by Avery Leigh Draut, principal songwriter, lyricist and chamber orchestra arranger, Night Palace’s debut album “Diving Rings’’ is awash in reverb-drenched atmospherics, orchestral flourishes and the wispy ASMR quality of Draut’s voice that acts as the stimulus from where technicolor dreamscapes can manifest in the mind’s eye. Draut reflects on the inner conflict she faced while recording the album. “Sometimes I was sure that I wanted to make a pop gem, sometimes a cosmic folk record and sometimes I would want to throw out everything except seventeen layers of vocals.” New York City via Athens, Georgia, orchestral indie-poppers Night Palace are joined by Tucson’s Hannah Yeun at Club Congress…

Hosted by Paul Bowman, the latest installment of Fruit Cocktail Lounge—Tucson’s signature jazz LGBTQ+ cocktail party and social—features performances by esteemed pianist Elliot Jones and powerhouse vocalist Kalae Nouveau at The Century Room…

Monday, Aug. 15

Emerging in the late 1990s, Static-X hit the Los Angeles scene hard, pushing a blunt-force trauma-inducing sound. Incorporating electronics, harsh industrial overtones and an unrelenting techno pulse — future-forward elements seldom heard in a thrash-metal context — the band quickly drew attention within the burgeoning nu metal movement. Static-X’s debut album “Wisconsin Death Trip” rose to platinum-selling success. Over the years, the band’s lineup fluctuated. Founding singer Wayne Static was a constant until his death in 2014 from a mixture of Xanax, other prescription drugs and alcohol. Filling the void, in 2020 Static-X released “Project: Regeneration Vol. 1” — an album that incorporates rediscovered demos that Static worked on prior to his death—to critical acclaim. Static-X—with new frontman Xer0—lay siege to Encore. Special guests Dead Rabbits and AZ The World Burnz lead the rampage…

With a name that evokes imagery of detritus one would find in an urban public works department, on their seventh full-length effort, “Electrified Brain,” Richmond, Virginia’s
Municipal Waste continue to carry the thrash-punk torch forward. Drain, Intoxicated and 200 Stab Wounds help to solidify a hard-hitting lineup at the Rialto Theater…

Florist is a friendship project that coalesced in the Catskill Mountains of Upstate New York in 2013. The quartet’s self-titled album — commingling improvisation, loops, found sounds and field recordings — functions as a folk album and audio documentary. Lead vocalist Emily Sprague reflects on the challenge of being a lyricist. “Language just scratches the surface of what we experience,” she ruminates. “I’m interested in words being more like a sentence saying a hundred emotions, yet being only five words long.” Indie folksters
Florist share the Club Congress stage with Marc Merza and Imogen Rose

Tuesday, Aug. 16

An offshoot from the same tree of life that sprouted crossover artists like Dwight Yoakam, Alejandro Rose-Garcia, aka Shakey Graves, is a little bit country, a little bit rock ‘n’ roll. The Austin, Texas native’s debut “Roll the Bones” was released into the world without a lick of advance promotion. Wallowing in the self-doubt that can accompany an artist’s first record, Rose-Garcia considered the possibility that, upon its release, “Roll the Bones” may only be received by a handful of listeners. Of course, that’s far from what happened, selling more than 100,000 units and remaining in Bandcamp’s top-selling folk albums. A decade later — preparing to release “Roll the Bones: Ten Year Special Edition’’ — Rose-Garcia reflected on his alter ego. “I hear someone who felt really trapped,” he revealed. “My first serious relationship had fallen apart and I was wanting to run away, be transient, and figure out who I was in the world.” Rose-Garcia expands, “I can hear myself blaming the girl and trying to support myself, saying to myself like maybe it’s okay to be dirty and crazy and have blinders on. Then, at the end, everything zooming back in and I’m saying ‘I guess I just got hurt and I’m in pain, but you know, it’s going to be okay.’” Shakey Graves returns to the Rialto Theater with Nigerian-Greek singer-songwriter Abraham Alexander

Until next week, XOXO…

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