XOXO: Mark Your Calendars

Mark your calendars…

Thursday, March 31 

In Brad Kahlhamer’s paintings, you may find ancestral talismans, skulls, totem poles, fragments of song lyrics, eagle feathers, geometric designs, cartoons, katsina dolls and company logos. He was born in Tucson (1956) to native parents and raised by a German-American adoptive family. Many years before establishing a career in New York as a visual artist, Kahlhamer learned to play guitar. “I was captured by the sound,” In a Minnesota Museum of Art (MMA) profile piece Kahlhamer recalled: “My first guitar was from Sears Roebuck and practically unplayable. I was in a variety of [Wisconsin] basement bands.” He spent a decade on the road before moving to New York, in time for the birth of the Bowery punk scene. “I felt really comfortable in the chaos. I loved it.” As he worked on his art, he played in a band he describes as “Patti Page [1950s pop/country singer] meets dubstep.” Kahlhamer tells The Huffington Post, “The sounds I play are like the forms in my work: Skeletal, jangly, wiry.” It is in the meeting place between the inherited and the adopted, from both a life lived and a life unknown, where the “third place” can be found. Kahlhamer tells MMA, “It makes sense, to me, to present an ‘impure’ kind of artwork. I don’t need to be easily categorized or identified.” Tucson Museum of Art present Brad Kahlhamer. At Club Congress…

Americana singer-songwriter Amber Norgaard performs. At Monterey Court…

With a repertoire that ranges from ’70s and ’80s to jazz, Gigi & The Glow deliver a high energy show. At St. Philip’s Plaza…

Naïm Amor - COURTESY PHOTO
Courtesy photo
Naïm Amor
“A candy-colored clown they call the sandman, tiptoes to my room every night, just to sprinkle stardust and to whisper.” Naïm Amor & the Cocktail Hours perform a blend of tiki and exotica mixed with jazz lounge. Late Night. At The Century Room… 

Friday, April 1   

Fierce advocates for immigration reform, voting and LGBTQ+ rights, the sibling pop duo of Jesse and Joy Huerta found their audience representing the bilingual millennials of today. Their success on the Billboard charts prompted the Latin Times to rave, “Jesse & Joy are probably some of the purest, most talented artists of our generation.” Their fifth album, Aire (2020) features collabs with Latin superstars J Balvin and Luis Fonsi. Beneath the burnish of slickly produced reggaeton, pop and hip-hop beats, the duo explore the bittersweet facets of love: Budding, burning, struggling, and crumbling. Jesse & Joy. Cliches Tour. At Rialto Theater…

The Stefan George Memorial Songwriting Competition—featuring performances by Brett Altman, Nico Barberan, Chris Baron, Corrie Lynn Green, Mark Holdaway, Kathleen Kelso, Allison Leah, Kay Miracle, Gabrielle Pietrangelo and Territory & Hombre—kicks off The 37th Annual Tucson Folk Festival. At Hotel Congress Plaza…

Bringing that “Spooky Riddim.” Working a decidedly off-putting eerie sound, this rising bass sensation—made up of Nathan Davis and Tiago Nunez—have found their lane on the heavier, darker side of EDM. Relentless Beats present
Hi I’m Ghost. At Gentle Ben’s…

“Just a Player.” Fahd Azam (aka Mr. Capone-E) was born in Pakistan to an ethnic Hazara family. After the family relocated to West Covina, California, Azam grew up surrounded by gangs. Later, he became a Sureño. Incarcerated at 18, he honed his talents as a rapper while serving out his sentence. Azam’s latest single “Soy Cholo” (2021) is an ode to street life.
Mr. Capone-E. Foo Fest. At Encore…

The tenor saxophonist led
Mike Moynihan Quartet tips the hat to a Saxophone Colossus. A Salute to Sonny Rollins. At The Century Room…

What began as a party, by two enterprising friends, in a tiny Echo Park dive bar, has blown-up into a phenomenon. “We made a Facebook event, and all of a sudden, 500 people showed up,” co-founder T.J. Petracca recalls. “We did another one, but there were twice as many people trying to get in.” It soon expanded exponentially to recurring events thrown by like-minded hipsters in over 30 cities and festivals nationwide. An evening with
Emo Night. At 191 Toole…

This guitar trio’s repertoire is deeply rooted in regional Mexican music: Rancheras, romanticas and corridos. From Sinaloa,
Los Hijos de Barron. At Club 4th Avenue…

DJ Herm presides over Spinnin’ Wheels: A roller disco and dance party. At MSA Annex…

Saturday, April 2 

“Every horn player listened to Earth Wind & Fire,” trumpeter Chris Botti recalls, in an interview with producer/musician Don Was for Blue Note. “But then I heard Miles Davis’ My Funny Valentine (1964). Within two or three notes, I just knew that I wanted to be a trumpet player for the rest of my life.” After dropping out of Indiana University during his senior year, Botti went on the road with legendary crooner Frank Sinatra for two weeks. “I thought that was enough to start my resume.” Not a bad start. Followed by a cross-country tour with drummer Buddy Rich. A lesser experience he describes as “a torture chamber.” You may recall “The Bus Tapes,” the now-infamous secret recordings of the mercurial bandleader verbally abusing his sidemen in the most vile ways. “I was on that bus.” Outclassing the past, Botti has become the largest-selling American instrumental artist. Chris Botti. At Fox Tucson Theatre…

The party continues.
Max Goldschmid Group. Chris Botti After-Party. At The Century Room…

Three humans getting primitive, staying primitive. It began casually as a jam session between multi-instrumentalists Charles Moothart and Ty Segall, bonding over a shared penchant for “heavy, caustic, fuzz pedal-worshiping 1960s proto-metal and [psychedelia].” The addition of bassist Chad Ubovich and the release of their self-titled debut (2013) established Fuzz as a bonafide ear-pummeling hard rock entity. Taking the spirit of 1972 prisoner, under the sonic wizardry of producer Steve Albini (Nirvana, Pixies), balancing compulsion and restraint, III (2020) is the transference of genetic strains in a long lineage, capturing the majesty of the rock ‘n’ roll power trio.
Fuzz. At 191 Toole…

The celebration continues. This year’s festival showcases the talents of over 125 local and national acoustic acts on 5 stages. Kitchen Musicians Association and the Southern Arizona Arts & Cultural Alliance present The 37th Annual
Tucson Folk Festival. Headliners include: Watkins Family Hour (featuring members of Nickel Creek), Tish Hinojosa, Vance Gilbert, Ryanhood, Red Yarn, Birds and Arrows, Raye Zaragoza, John Coinman and more. At Jácome Plaza (and online via livestream broadcast). Though Sunday, April 3. See tucsonfolkfestival.org for a full schedule…

The Muffulettas perform Bourbon Street jazz. At Monterey Court…

TSO trumpets
Hayato Tanaka and Betsy Bright Morgan have arranged a program that features J.S. Bach: Allegro from Italian Concerto, Gabrieli: Sonata pian’ e forte, Scheidt: Galliard Battaglia, L. Boulanger: D’Un Vieux Jardin, and Wagner: Selections for brass choir from 6 operas. Tucson Symphony Orchestra Brass Ensemble present Up Close Music for Brass Chamber. At Tucson Symphony Orchestra…

Local favorites
Taking Back Harambe and Tucson is the Reason lead the revival. Emo Night Tucson Live. At Club Congress…

Featuring Mariah McCammond (fiddle) and Anton Shekerjiev (guitar),
Thistle and Bear perform traditional Celtic and Scandinavian folk music. At MotoSonora Brewing Company…

NatureMed, a Marana cannabis dispensary, is throwing its first Dirt Fest concert, complete with food trucks and live music. Today’s lineup is rock ’n’ roll, with
The Dirt, Mr. SKynrd, Drop D and more. Sunday is a country tribute featuring Vegas McGraw, Backroads, Billy Shaw Jr. Band, County Line and more. Gates open at 2 p.m. both days at The Station, 8235 N. Silverbell Road.

Sunday, April 3   

Featuring saxophonist Autumn Dominguez, the After Hours Quartet hosts a jazz jam session. At The Century Room…

Led by vocalist Amy Virnelson,
Soul Essential draw from a repertoire of classic and modern R&B and soul. Congress Cookout. At Hotel Congress Plaza… 

Monday, April 4   

Club Whutever resident DJs—alice.km, Hot Leather Disco, and PC Party—spin EDM. At Hotel Congress (Tap Room patio)…

Tuesday, April 5 

Formed while attending high school, Chris Fronzak stumbled upon the story of Attila the Hun—a feared leader of nomads, known to ancient Romans as the “Scourge of God,” who amassed a vast empire through brutality—while reading a book. After signing to Artery Recordings they released Soundtrack to a Party (2008), their debut album. Although life as modern-day marauders has not come without turbulence. Having weathered several allegations of sexual misconduct and subsequent lineup changes, this band of Atlantien metalcore maniacs seek Closure (2021), the title of their ninth studio album. Atilla. Rage Fest Tour. At 191 Toole…

For the past 40 years, George Howard has played an integral part in weaving the rich tapestry that forms the Southern Arizona blues scene, as musician, producer, promoter, and founder of the Tucson Musicians Museum. Inspired by blues performances this season at the Fox—Robert Cray, Taj Mahal, Keb’ Mo,’ and others—Arizona Blues Hall of Famer
George Howard hosts Curious Conversations. At Fox Tucson Theatre (and online via Zoom)…

Wednesday, April 6

“The Dexterity of Luck.” Assembled in 1994 from disenfranchised members of Rodan, Lungfish, Rex, and Hoover, the band’s name quizzically refers to the period of correspondence between lovesick writers Anaïs Nin and Henry Miller. During a relatively short lifespan, June Of 44 released four albums—skimming at the harder edges of math rock, while dabbling with electronics, loops, and samples—before dissolving in 1999. Now, they are back with a new collection, Revisionist: Adaptations & Future Histories in the Time of Love and Survival (2021). June Of 44. At 191 Toole. Carbon Canyon opens…

In a statement, trop-pop duo Summer Salt’s Matthew Terry says that the band’s star has been on the rise ever since ditching their hometown of Dallas, after graduating high school, for the arts-and-culture oasis of Austin. “We really wanted to take the opportunity to challenge ourselves and see our songs in a different light, outside of our comfort zone and bedrooms.”
Summer Salt. At Club Congress...

On the horizon: Arizona Arts Live presents the “Queen of African Music,” Angélique Kidjo. At Rialto Theater. April 7…

Featuring a cavalcade of country superstars—Blake Shelton, Riley Green, Tracy Lawrence, Morgan Wallen y un chingo mas—Country Thunder Arizona 2022 returns to Florence, Arizona. April 7-10. See countrythunder.com for a full schedule…

Until next week, XOXO…

Comments (0)

Add a comment

Add a Comment

Tucson Weekly

Best of Tucson Weekly

Tucson Weekly