XOXO: Mark Your Calendars

Mark your calendars...

THURSDAY, MARCH 10

Since their formation at the University of North Texas in 2000—where Mike Eli and James Young were dorm roommates their freshman year—the Eli Young Band has landed 14 singles on the Billboard charts, including four No. 1 hits. “Love Talking,” their brand-new single, finds the song’s protagonist professing his love. Unlike most country songs, this one isn’t an alcohol-fueled confession. Nope. This guy has “never been more sober” and simply “can’t blame a liquor buzz” for being head over heels. Go figure. Eli Young Band bring Always The Love Songs (2022), their latest EP. At Rialto Theater...

On their latest single—a reimagined/remixed cover of George Michael’s “Father Figure”—Marta De- Leon and crew deviate from their usual poppy-punky snarling wistfulness to deliver an infectious 4-on-the-floor dance groove. Weekend Lovers offer something fresh. At Hotel Congress Plaza... Reawakening nostalgic memories of old-school dirty punk, this SoCal three-piece powerhouse offer a unique take on reggae rock. The Resinators. At Chicago Bar...

FRIDAY, MARCH 11

In 2007, chanteuse Elizabeth Bougerol and bandleader Evan Palazzo met in New York City after responding to a Craigslist ad about a jazz jam session above a Manhattan noodle shop. Who would have known then that their self-titled debut album (2014) would spend a year on the Billboard Jazz Charts? Go figure. Discover what the hot fuss is all about. The Hot Sardines present Welcome Home, Bon Voyage (2019). At Fox Tucson Theatre...

In the early ’90s, Roberto Flores began releasing mixtapes under the tag Lil Rob. In 1994, at the age of 18, he got shot. In a rare interview with Chicago Street TV, Flores candidly detailed the event that shattered his jaw and claimed an eye, nearly ending his musical career. “They just came down to the neighborhood...

They shot at us. We shot at them. Luckily I didn’t get into any trouble. That would’ve changed my life forever.” After recovering from his injuries, on his 1997 debut album, Crazy Life, he declared, “Soy Chingon” [loosely meaning “I’m a badass” in Spanish]. Breaking new ground, as his fame grew Flores established himself on the West Coast scene as a rapper with a Chicano worldview. Lil Rob. At Club 4th Avenue...

Midwestern folk singer David Huckfelt says he is “beyond excited for this first-ever quadruple songwriter show.” Featuring a veritable cast of outlaws, Native musicians, and cow-boys, esteemed Tucson songwriters Howe Gelb, Billy Seldmayr and Keith Secola join Huckfelt to form Lost Barrio Songslingers Circle. At Hotel Congress Plaza...

Pursuing a vision, guitarist Aaron Turner began fleshing out material before Sumac coalesced. His intention was to write some of the heaviest music ever created. Pacific Northwest post-metal powerhouse Sumac hammer out their latest, “Two Beasts.” At Club Congress...

Mike Gaube’s Headbangers presents Noise Pollution: The AC-DC Experience. At The Rock...

From the unsullied mountains of the American Northwest, these siblings’ harmonica, upright bass and acoustic guitar-driven repertoire spans from heart-rending ballads to barn-burning bluegrass numbers. The Brothers Reed. At Monterey Court...

SATURDAY, MARCH 12

Over the course of six albums, platinum-selling country star Justin Moore’s brand of traditional country has amassed a loyal following. Music website Country Standard Time considers Moore to be “country music’s champion of the everyman.” Reminiscing on his upbringing in rural Arkansas and appreciation for life’s simple pleasures, the lead single from Straight Outta the Country (2021) struck a chord with the salt of the Earth, propelling “We Didn’t Have Much” to No. 1 on Billboard’s Country Airplay chart. Justin Moore & Friends: Heath Sanders and Stephen Paul. At Tucson Arena...

Known for their viral remix of Tove Lo’s “Habits (Stay High),” electronic duo Hippie Sabotage introduce Floating Palace (2021). At Rialto Theater...

“In the moonlight, all truths will be revealed.” Inspired by the Ingmar Bergman 1955 film, Smiles of a Summer Night, centering on a deliciously tangled web of affairs, Arizona Opera presents A Little Night Music, in the first of two performances. Featuring the internationally acclaimed American soprano, Patricia Racette. At Tucson Music Hall...

As a young boy growing up on the south side of Chicago, this singer-songwriter sang in a Pentecostal church choir before discovering the power of soul, gaining appreciation for its contrasts: The dark and light, anger and joy, earthy and airborne. Shawn James finds A Place in the Unknown. At 191 Toole. With Gravedancer...

In addition to being a multidimensional artist and painter, classically trained Yaqui guitarist Gabriel Ayala’s resumé includes performances for a U.S. President and the Pope. Featuring The Ayala 5Tet, Gabriel Ayala performs a Concert For Healing. At Fox Tucson Theatre...

At 21, singer-songwriter Dan Sheron’s life collapsed. After a failed attempt at journalism in Moscow, reeling from an unbearable heartbreak, in a third-class train car somewhere in western Siberia, singing and drinking with strangers, Balto was born. At Hotel Congress Plaza...

In an interview with NME, bedroom popper Claud Mintz offers insight into Super Monster (2021). “I’m constantly observing and analyzing, which is really bad and something I’m trying to break out of. But I think a lot of this record is me stepping out of myself and out of the relationship, and over-analyzing it like I do with everything.” Claud. At Club Congress...

Tucson Kitchen Musicians Association’s Spring Benefit Concert is being held at Monterey Court. Proceeds to benefit the upcoming 37th Annual Tucson Folk Festival...

SUNDAY, MARCH 13

With a knack for plainspoken song-writing, gravel-throated Texas red dirt country singer Wade Bowen offers his latest, Hold My Beer, Vol. 2 (2020). At The Rock...

Formed in 2020, when blues/roots heavyweights Johnny Main (The 44s) and Eric VonHerzen (Walter Trout, Social Distortion) joined forces to create a supergroup. The Southern Arizona Blues Heritage Foundation present The Atomic 44s. At Monterey Court...

“Bathroom Stall,” Maia Sinaiko tells Pitchfork, “is about a relationship I had with someone who struggled with addiction, who very tragically passed away three years ago while we were together.” On Crossing Over (2021) Bay Area trio Sour Widows discover a new intensity by turning inward. At House of Bards...

With influences ranging from the Rolling Stones to Black Sabbath to James Brown intermixed with traditional African rhythms and bush village songs, these Zambian rockers intend to cause havoc. W.I.T.C.H. At Club Congress...

MONDAY, MARCH 14

Tackling destructive habits, on Bad Vacation (2020) songwriter Elizabeth Anne Odachowski is at her most self aware. “I was writing what I needed to hear,” Odachowski explains in a statement. “I was quite literally writing a stronger, more empowered version of myself into existence.” Liza Anne. At 191 Toole...

Here Comes More Bad News. Bay-area punks Spiritual Cramp slither like “Rattlesnakes in the City.” At Club Congress...

TUESDAY, MARCH 15

In the documentary fi lm LoudQUIET- loud (2006), Kurt Cobain is said to have stolen their riffs and Bono avowed to be a major fan. Since their formation in Boston (1986), their unique blunge of surf, psychedelia, and grunge piloted the Pixies to become one of the pioneers of alternative rock. Recorded in a converted church in upstate New York, the gothic surroundings influenced principal songwriter Black Francis the writing and recording process of Beneath the Eyrie (2019). “I wanted to intermingle with the spirit world, with life and death and with the mystical and a more surreal landscape.” Pixies. At Rialto Theater...

To Henry St. Claire Fredericks, Jr. (aka Taj Mahal), convention means nothing, but traditions are holy. A scholar of blues music, Fredericks studied ethnomusicology at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. There he was introduced to the folk music of the Caribbean and West Africa. Over time he began to incorporate elements of reggae, calypso, jazz, zydeco, R&B, gospel music, and country blues to form his unique sound. According to The Rough Guide to Rock (2003), Taj Mahal is one of the first major artists to explore the possibilities of world music. Known as a blues musician, he has transcended the blues by not leaving it behind. “The blues is bigger than most people think,” Fredericks says. “You could hear Mozart play the blues. It might be more like a lament. But I’m going to tell you, the blues is in there.” Taj Mahal Sextet. At Fox Tucson Theatre...

From Seattle, this trio’s multilingual music covers a range of styles: Art-punk, psych, pop, cumbia and experimental. The Stranger opines, “With wild songs that gleefully twist rock conventions while maintaining hooks amid the encroaching chaos, Tres Leches recall the Pixies...

when they still radiated danger.” Rising from the dark basement, Tres Leches share a taste of Amorfo (2019). At Club Congress...

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16

Taking piano lessons (which he initially disliked) from the age of eight, Trevor Christensen later attended the Berklee College of Music before launching Said the Sky. His melodic background and technical training bring a fresh perspective to EDM. Relentless Beats present Said The Sky. Sentiment Tour. At Rialto Theater...

From Nova Scotia, after a five-year absence, Celtic folk duo Cassie and Maggie MacDonald return on St. Patrick’s Eve. At Berger Performing Arts Center...

Until next week, XOXO...
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