XOXO: Mark Your Calendars

Thursday, Jan. 20 

In New York’s East Harlem, not a day goes by when the intoxicating rhythms of salsa, boogaloo, and Latin soul can be heard wafting through the air. Born on the city streets, this rich musical legacy is deeply ingrained in this ensemble’s identity. Coming at you full force, three-time Grammy winners, Spanish Harlem Orchestra are dedicated to celebrating the rich Latin, Caribbean and African influences that pervade El Barrio they call home. At Rialto Theater…

Pushing boundaries, electronic synth duo Boy Harsher’s fifth release isn’t really a traditional album, but rather, a soundtrack to a short horror film. Balancing cinematic instrumentals with pop songs,
Boy Harsher presents The Runner (2022). At Club Congress…

After unceremoniously announcing the band’s imminent demise in 2003, post-hardcore/alternative rockers Shiner have apparently reconsidered and return with
Schadenfreude (2020) their first studio album since 2001’s The Egg. Like the album title suggests, Shiner derive pleasure from another person’s misfortune. At Rialto Theater…

Embarking on an eclectic flight path, at a turn peaceful then turbulent, their ever changing sound can land listeners on a dance floor or in a mosh pit. Lisa Lemke and Mik Garrison, deliver Space Adventure 2020 -
Episode 1 (2020) their latest EP. The Bird Lords. Live & Free. At Tap & Bottle (downtown)…

Friday, Jan. 21 

“Ay ay ay ay ay, que bonito es el amor pero me gusta más el vino.” In “La Cumbia del Vino,” Jenny Ball professes her affinity for wine over the beauty of love. Ten years after walking into a Madrid tablao [a venue where flamenco is performed] where the odyssey of Jenny and The Mexicats began—when this trumpet-wielding firebrand of an English singer joined forces with a Mexican rockabilly double bassist and the “best flamenco/punk guitarist” in Spain—it remains the seductive rhythm of the music that will not release Ball from La Diabla inside. Like Romani nomads possessing an untamed spirit ill-suited to the conventions of society, the band has never been under contract with any record company. They function independently: No borders, no labels, no prejudices and no shortcomings. Jenny & The Mexicats promise a Fiesta Ancestral. At Rialto Theater. With Santa Pachita

What was hidden shall be made known. Searching for the light of truth, Room Enough, Time Enough (2021), the brand-new album of songs by midwestern folk singer David Huckfelt, marks the junction of rivers where poetry, activism, conservation and Native Americana meet. (Huckfelt has been active in the fight against Line 3, a tar sands pipeline that violates the treaty rights of the Ojibwe people and poses significant environmental threat.) Recorded in the borderlands of Tucson, the album’s cast of outlaws, Native musicians, and cowboys includes Greg Brown, Dave Simonett (Trampled By Turtles), Billy Sedlmayr (who contributed the song “Cole Younger”), Howe Gelb, Pieta Brown, Jackie Bird, Keith Secola and Milton “Quiltman” Sahme. In troubled times, the former theology student’s music functions as a darkly poetic canticle to protect all things vulnerable and sublime. David Huckfelt & Billy Sedlmayr with The Mother Higgins Children’s Band (Gabriel Sullivan, Winston Watson, Connor Gallaher and Thøger Lund). At 191 Toole…

A musical chameleon who is equally at home playing modern jazz, salsa, country or rock, drummer Arthur Vint left his home in Tucson, Arizona, for the bright lights of New York City in 2007. There he built a career performing as a sideman with Postmodern Jukebox, Vince Giordano & The Nighthawks, country singer Zephaniah O’Hora and others. He assumed the role of bandleader—exploring themes from the great Spaghetti Western soundtrack composer Ennio Morricone—for his second studio recording, Death Rides A Horse (2017), which was met with critical acclaim. The Huffington Post called it, “One of the most refreshing, melodic, and successfully themed albums this year.” Arthur Vint & Associates take audiences on a trip Through The Badlands. At Hotel Congress (plaza stage)…

The stuff of legend. Tucson’s Latin dance party sin fronteras El Tambó celebrates the cultural remezcla of the borderlands. DJ Humblelianess presides. At Hotel Congress (plaza stage)…

Melding the mystical strains of Africa, the Middle East, and the Caribbean, Baba Marimba create a potent mix, compelling bodies to dance. At Monterey Court…

Highlighting the vocal talents of soprano Nicole Cabell, the Tucson Symphony Orchestra, led by conductor José Luis Gomez, unveil Mahler’s Vision of Paradise. “I’m excited to introduce Tucson audiences to Florence Price, the first female African-American composer of classical music, whose beautiful music is finally enjoying deserved appreciation,” Gomez says. At Tucson Music Hall…

Formed in 1934 by Roy Rogers, Bob Nolan, and Tim Spencer, The Sons of the Pioneers’ accomplished musicianship and soaring harmony vocals—along with a stage show romanticizing the image of the American West—forever transformed cowboy music. “Cool Water” and “Tumbling Tumbleweeds” have become anthems of Western lore that can be heard echoing off canyon walls. Time-travel with the Sons of the Pioneers, in the first of a series of five performances. At Gaslight Theater (Oro Valley)…

In a production abounding in laser lights, video walls, and special effects, Phoenix’s Shine On Floyd: A Tribute to Pink Floyd perform The Dark Side of the Moon in its entirety, along with other Floyd classics. At Berger Performing Arts Center… 

Saturday, Jan. 22 

As the title to his 2019 song suggests, trumpeter Shamarr Allen is a “Bandhead for Life.” Just like the music, art and the second-line funeral processions that emanate from the Lower 9th Ward of New Orleans—vibrant and fiercely independent, with a history of survival—Allen has influenced jazz, hip-hop, rock, funk, blues and country through collaborations with a diversity of artists: Willie Nelson, Patti LaBelle, Harrick Connick Jr, Lenny Kravitz and others. He is a music composer, lyricist and producer, in addition to being a trumpeter with an edgy sound, Shamarr Allen transcends musical boundaries. At Hotel Congress (plaza stage)…

“As punk as the Sex Pistols and as violent as Pérez Prado.” Throughout Orkesta Mendoza’s discography, bandleader Sergio Mendoza, who grew up in both Sonora, Mexico and Nogales, Arizona, has jostled between two distinct musical and psychological spaces created by the influence of biculturalism and bilingualism germane to life to the borderland, where mestizo-infused genres like boogaloo, cumbia, chicha and mambo intersect. “Their music goes in myriad directions, rhythms and modes—big-band orchestrations mixed with lo-fi electronica, vocals en Español combined with moving instrumentals,” says Calexico’s Joey Burns.
Orkesta Mendoza presenta Curandero (2020), their fifth studio album. At Hotel Congress (plaza stage)…

Armando Moreno’s latest release,
Here and Back Again (2019), processes the death of his beloved mother, pouring his heart into soul-stirring lyrics to take the listener on an unforgettable journey of love, heartache and hope. Armando Moreno & The Revival. At Saint Charles Tavern…

Mr. Skynyrd pays homage to the late Ronnie Van Zant and Lynyrd Skynyrd crew. At Encore…

Accompanied by slide guitarist
Joe Novelli, whiskey-and-cigarette-cured singer-songwriter Joe Peña (Greyhound Soul, Sundowners) performs his gritty, darkly soulful original compositions. At MotoSonora Brewing Company. With an opening set by Tempe’s The Blinding Suns

Turntablists
Bex & Halsero drop napalm bombs on the dancefloor. At Hotel Congress (plaza stage)…

Sunday, Jan. 23 

Connie Brannock’s Little House of Blues keep the charcoal red hot. Congress Cookout. At Hotel Congress (plaza stage)…

Monday, Jan. 24 

Club Whutever DJs alice.km, Hot Leather Disco, and PC Party spin EDM. At Hotel Congress (Tap Room patio)…

Wednesday, Jan. 26 

With a sweet tooth for classic pop songwriting, Minneapolis indie rockers Bad Bad Hats perform material from Walkman (2021), their third LP. With The Ophelias. At 191 Toole…

Austin Meade was a drummer for years before finding his voice when he began playing guitar as a teen in his pastor father’s church band. Inspired by country music legends like Johnny Cash, Kody West took to the road as soon as he could put a band together. Country rockers
Austin Meade & Kody West tie loose ends. At The Rock. With special guest Charlie Stout…

With a score that spawned hits “Defying Gravity,” “Popular,” and “For Good,” Broadway blockbuster Wicked by Winnie Holzman has been hailed by
The New York Times as “the defining musical of the decade.” Wicked, the untold true story of the witches of Oz, runs through Feb. 6. At Centennial Hall…

Thursday, Jan. 27

A hit single can change your life. Citing American poetry (the works of Walt Whitman in particular) as inspiration for her songwriting, Joan Osborne was a well-regarded figure on New York’s blues club scene, but practically unknown elsewhere at the beginning of 1995,. But that had changed by March, when the release of Relish (1995), her debut studio album, ascended the Billboard Hot 100. Propelled by hit single “One of Us,” the album peaked at No. 4, garnering seven Grammy nominations and forever changing everything. It was a blessing and a curse. “When I had that big song,” Osborne admits, “I was grateful, but I froze up inside. I was afraid. I didn’t want to make a misstep. I got tied up in knots trying to please everyone, even myself. I became the poster child for the sophomore slump.” She never had another single on the pop charts. Twenty-seven years after her breakthrough, she follows her restless musical heart on her latest release, Trouble and Strife (2020), exploring a diverse range of genres. “We were going for a ’70s AM radio vibe,” says Osborne. Taking a hard look at transgender rights, climate change, immigration and disinformation, she adds: “These songs are the most political I’ve ever written.” Joan Osborne & The Weepies continue to break new ground. At Fox Tucson Theatre…

In 1988, after moving to Boston, blue-eyed soul/folk-rock singer-songwriter Martin Sexton launched his musical career busking on street corners around the city. As his following grew, his collection of self-produced demo recordings,
In The Journey (1991), released on an 8-track cassette, sold an impressive 15,000 copies to fans. Shifting his voice effortlessly in-and-out of falsetto, on “Women and Wine” Sexton toes the line. “Like the mist of morning, my dream remains. Hanging in the burnt fields. The flames hiss a chorus of your disdain. Picking up the past I left behind.” Taking to the high road, with what Rolling Stone calls his “soul-marinated voice,” an acoustic guitar, and a suitcase full of heartfelt songs, Martin Sexton presents 2020 Vision (2021). At 191 Toole…

Traveling through the forgotten landscapes of Nogrod, one of two Dwarven cities in the Blue Mountains, slumber drunk, inspired by grunge, dripping with sheets of sopping guitars and ’90s angst, these 20-something Tucson alternative rockers are making quite a racket.
Droll live up to their moniker. At Club Congress. With Class and Deep Stay

A revolving cast of guest DJs spin dubstep, house, and drum ’n’ bass. The Underground Clubhouse. At The Rock…

Recently voted Best Musical Act of 2021 (by TW’s Best of Tucson® readers poll),
Miss Olivia & the Interlopers radiate their signature soulful, funky grooves and tell Tiny Tales. At Tap & Bottle (downtown)…

Until next week, XOXO… 

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