Favorite

Vintage Vinyl: The Dearly Beloved 

The Dearly Beloved “Peep Peep Pop Pop”/”It Is Better

click to enlarge vintage_vinyl.jpg
click to enlarge LEE JOSEPH
  • Lee Joseph

KTKT's Dan Gates suggested the name Dearly Beloved, which was the title of a book that had caught his eye. As The Intruders/Qunistrells needed a new name, it was perfect for media hype. Their late '65 press release stated: "for they are no longer Intruders, they are now Dearly Beloved." Gates also insisted the Dearly's record a song he had high hopes for. The group initially hated the tune which Gates played for them off of a primitive demo recorded several years earlier, which featured a group of black teens pounding on a piano singing in doo-wop style the song's title, chorus, hook; "Peep Peep Pop Pop." The Dearly Beloved gave in and recorded a superb version the song at Audio Recorders in Phoenix. Gates licensed the track to Bobby Boyd/Boyd Records of Oklahoma, who, incredibly, managed to mangle the band's new moniker, which appeared on the record's label as Beloved One's. Oops. Despite the error, the song topped the charts in Tucson, staying at NO. 1 for several weeks during the summer of '66. Boyd then made a deal with Columbia Records who re-released the 45 in September. And once again, someone in the process got the band's new name wrong, typeset as Dearly Beloveds on their debut Columbia 45. Wow.

click to enlarge LEE JOSEPH
  • Lee Joseph

In an article called "KOMA, a Record Breaker," touting the Oklahoma City powerhouse radio station which appeared in Billboard Magazine's Nov 5, 1966 issue, the record seemed to be on its way to breaking in several markets. The story quotes Boyd saying "KOMA, KRUX in Phoenix, and KTKT in Tucson, Ariz. all leaped on "Peep Peep Pop Pop," a record featuring the Dearly Beloved that Columbia Records had picked up. Boyd, who produced the Dearly Beloved, Lynda Lewis, Smokey Stover and Jimmy Velvet for Columbia said "It's the extra reach of KOMA that so important. It's heard in at least 20 states."

click to enlarge fullsizerender_11_.jpg

"Peep Peep Pop Pop" became Tucson's No. 1 selling record of 1966 though it only bubbled under Billboard's top 100. It seems that Columbia didn't press enough copies for proper distribution.

Lee Joseph grew up in Tucson. He's a DJ (Luxuriamusic.com), marketer of cool shit (Reverberations Media) and founder/CEO of internationally respected Dionysus Records, an indie that has long specialized in releasing super-rare music, and more. He came of age in the first wave of Tucson punk rock and is an expert on Tucson music. He now lives in California.


More by Lee Joseph

  • Vintage Vinyl

    Jack Wallace and the High Tones “You Are The One”/”I Think of You” Zoom Records, ZR001, 1959
    • Mar 30, 2017
  • Vintage Vinyl

    The Floating House Band LP–Takoma Records C1029, 1970
    • Mar 9, 2017
  • Vintage Vinyl

    Wah-hoo, Ah-ha! An enthusiastic start to the multi-name, eight-45 RPM discography of Tucson’s The Dearly Beloved.
    • Mar 2, 2017
  • More »

Comments

Showing 1-1 of 1

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-1 of 1

Add a comment

Readers also liked…

  • Harvest Rising

    Storied Tucson songwriter weighs in on Neil Young, especially Harvest, and the superstar’s influence on his pre-teen heart
    • Sep 29, 2016
  • ¡Viva La Tradición!

    Mariachi Los Camperos de Nati Cano are keeping this hertiage genre alive, even if the kids prefer narco corridos
    • Dec 3, 2015

The Range

Get Your Fair On!

Streets of This Town: Spring

More »

Latest in Music Feature

  • Forever Young

    A folk musician’s life, love and getting down the road
    • Apr 27, 2017
  • Noise Annoys

    Doni and Adobe House
    • Apr 27, 2017
  • More »

Most Commented On

  • Growing Old with Moz

    He’s still better than a stupid T-shirt
    • Apr 6, 2017
  • Tale of Two Cities

    Seattle’s Tacocat talks up the real cost of gentrification, Tucsonans chime in
    • Apr 20, 2017
  • More »

People who saved…

Facebook Activity

© 2017 Tucson Weekly | 7225 Mona Lisa Rd. Ste. 125, Tucson AZ 85741 | (520) 797-4384 | Powered by Foundation