September 23, 2015 Slideshows » Music

Local Sound 

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Heather Hoch
loud uses circuit boards made on the Navajo Nation in northern Arizona.
Heather Hoch
Assembling microphones takes precision and a very steady hand.
The ribbon in a ribbon microphone is a very fragile component made of medical-grade aluminum.
Heather Hoch
It’s important not to even nick the ribbon, so as not to alter the finished sound.
Heather Hoch
Rodger Cloud, along with four other employees, run the entire operation here in Tucson.
Heather Hoch
Cloud says he has to stay away from coffee and stress when assembling his microphones.
Heather Hoch
A finished Cloud Microphone uses parts almost entirely fabricated in state.
Heather Hoch
Microphones are just part of the Cloud story—these innovative mic activators are unlike anything else on the market.
Heather Hoch
Local recording studios like St. Cecilia Studios use Cloud’s products to offer a warm, vintage sound in a
Heather Hoch
Steven Tracy of St. Cecilia Studios says he doesn’t know how to record without Cloud’s products now.
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Heather Hoch
loud uses circuit boards made on the Navajo Nation in northern Arizona.

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