David Safier 
Member since Apr 11, 2011


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Re: “Chris Bannon: 'We Are Coming For You!'

Here's the info on Steve Bannon's appearance in Tucson

"Stever Bannon will keynote a dinner benefiting the Brian Terry Foundation, established by the family of the Border Patrol agent killed in a 2010 gunfight with cartel operatives south of Tucson.

"Bannon will be presented with the Brian Terry Courage in Journalism and Reporting Award to mark Breitbart's reporting on the Fast and Furious probe of drug cartel straw buyers and gun-smuggling.

. . .

"Tickets are $50 and $125 for the dinner at the J.W. Marriott Starr Pass Resort, which will be hosted by Fox News's William La Jeunesse.

"Previous speakers and honorees at the group's events include former U.S. Reps. Gabrielle Giffords and Ron Barber, reporter Sharyl Attkisson, Rep. Darrell Issa, Gov. Doug Ducey, and BP Agent Eric Gough."

13 likes, 9 dislikes
Posted by David Safier on 11/14/2017 at 5:45 PM

Re: “I Infantilize High School Students and Have Little Faith in the Intelligence of High School Teachers? Who Knew? (Certainly Not Me)

Thanks John, I found the quote, though it's in Fortune, not Forbes.

You originally said, Buffett "hasn't paid a penny on his $81 billion dollar fortune." Now you say he paid $1.85 million in 2015 and extrapolated his entire tax payments over 40 years, though how you can do that is a mystery to me, and you called the $74 million you say he paid "a rounding error." To recap, first he paid nothing, then he paid $74 million, which is the same as nothing. I have to say, your ability to admit you were wrong and say you weren't wrong astounds me.

For anyone who is interested, here's the passage that quote comes from. The article, "The Biggest Difference Between Trump and Buffett on Taxes" talks about how Buffett thinks the rich should pay taxes and Trump thinks they shouldn't. Buffett comes off pretty well. I think the author of the piece agrees.

"In his response to Trumps claim, Buffett revealed that he paid $1.85 million in federal income tax on an income of $11.56 million in 2015, an effective rate of 16%. While this rate is based upon Buffetts income before deductions, an effective rate of 16% supports Buffett Rule advocates claims that millionaires are not paying their fair share. Clearly, tax savings were not Buffetts priority: He was only able to write off $3.47 million of his $2.85 billion in charitable contributions that year, since those deductions are limited to 30% of income.

"Buffett does not advocate that high-income individuals voluntarily pay more taxes, but that the law itself be changed to require them to pay more. He has also called for raising the capital gains tax rate and for raising or removing altogether the wage cap on Social Security taxes."

11 likes, 4 dislikes
Posted by David Safier on 11/06/2017 at 5:53 PM

Re: “I Infantilize High School Students and Have Little Faith in the Intelligence of High School Teachers? Who Knew? (Certainly Not Me)

John Huppenthal, I looked for the Forbes article saying Buffett "hasn't paid a penny on his $81 billion dollar fortune." I couldn't find it. Could you supply us with a link? I'd love to read it. It would be helpful, but not necessary, if you would quote the passages you're referring to.

Thank you.

16 likes, 3 dislikes
Posted by David Safier on 11/06/2017 at 7:43 AM

Re: “'Arizonans United for Health Care' Wants You to Know, Healthcare Signups Begin Nov. 1, and You Can Get Help With Your Application

Thanks to the commenter who said I got the date wrong in the headline. A few people pointed it out to me. My error, my apologies. The date has been corrected to November 1.

5 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by David Safier on 11/03/2017 at 9:50 AM

Re: “The Fed Tax Cut, AZ School Grades, Results-Based Funding, and a W.A.G.

sdotwarren, I think the 90% you're talking about is the percent of students who passed AzMERIT. That doesn't mean individual students got 90-out-of-100 on their scores. I don't know which BASIS campus your son attends, but looking at the AzMERIT scores, it's likely that something like 50% of the students in his school scored at the highest level. That means of the rest, 40% passed at a lower level and 10% didn't pass. It might be hard to evaluate the growth of the top half -- though remember, their growth is evaluated against other students who scored at the same level -- the other half would have many peers with similar scores in other schools across the state.

8 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by David Safier on 10/27/2017 at 9:20 AM

Re: “The Fed Tax Cut, AZ School Grades, Results-Based Funding, and a W.A.G.

"Competition," I wish I knew how to follow up on the less-than-top BASIS scores. I have no idea how to gather the data, but the results would be interesting no matter how they went.

8 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by David Safier on 10/27/2017 at 9:11 AM

Re: “Koch Brothers Infiltrate Pima County Schools With a High School Econ Course

Betts, my understanding is, the course was approved, not by the board but by the office of the assistant superintendent in charge of curriculum. Based on my experience as a high school teacher, that's not surprising. Teachers often recommend new courses they want to teach. If they're approved by the school's curriculum director and principal, they're sent to the district administration for approval, which is generally granted. That process makes sense to me, both for efficiency and for empowering individual teachers and schools. I don't know the process that went into approving the course at the other three local districts.

I don't think the problem is with the process, or with TUSD and the other districts. The problem is, the system was gamed by the folks at the Freedom Center. They exploited a normal trait in school districts to slip a course they created into high schools. Now it's time for the boards to take a hard look at the courses and decide if they belong in their district curriculum.

I would rather have something like this happen, then correct it, than tighten up the procedure of approving new courses and take power and authority away from the individual schools by making them jump through more administrative hoops to gain course approval. If the procedure is tightened up, it should be in a limited way -- say, if there are red flags about the suggested new course originating outside of the district, then it should be looked at more carefully and the board should be involved.

11 likes, 9 dislikes
Posted by David Safier on 10/17/2017 at 6:52 AM

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