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Comment Archives: Stories: Cinema

Re: “Beasts of the Southern Wild

I was SO amazed by this film, and I'm hardcore about quality cinema! You MUST see this on the big screen while you can!

2 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Pan Satyrson on 08/10/2012 at 4:09 PM

Re: “No Strings Attached

nice

Posted by Teresa Slupska on 04/30/2012 at 9:06 AM

Re: “Inception

James Cameron took us into the future and to stars for a breathtaking look at a world through the eyes of virtual reality, while director Christopher Nolan takes us into the human mind and a view of reality through our dreams. Philosophers from Plato to Descartes have tackled the question of reality and the dream world for a couple of thousand years. Christopher Nolan brings these questions and concepts of dreams and reality and drops it on our doorstep and then steps back and laughs. Like the Greek Myth of Theseus and Ariadne, sometimes the myths just don't make any sense, oh well. What Christopher Nolan does in Inception, is walk the fine line between madness and sanity, between greatness and confusion. The ultimate concept that permeates Inception is that one must trust. As the characters must trust each other when entering the dream world, the audience must trust that the world that Nolan creates on screen will not crumble before our eyes leaving us in limbo. Nolan is not above a prank or two. Read more: http://dld.bz/ndsn

Posted by robb1138 on 08/04/2010 at 1:49 PM

Re: “Best Worst Movie

Michael Paul Stephanson and George Hardy turned a miserable defeat into a success with this documentary about Troll 2. I laughed through most of the move and thought how well Stephanson's direction, editing and pacing were well done. The director was smart to focus on Hardy and not on himself, as actor/dentist George Hardy is the best loved character in the cast and the film. Also of notable mention was Stephanson's Skype interview that The Loft displayed on the big screen. When the Loft Cinema's Program Director Jeff Yanc turned the laptop's camera towards the audience, and Michael's face lit up with happiness. I found the Best Worst Movie extremely funny, and I found myself smitten with the documentary.

Posted by robb1138 on 07/08/2010 at 4:24 PM

Re: “The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus

I'm not a writer; but I do know a worthwhile film when I view it.
Instead of boring you folks (Grimm and Jimmy D.) with my thoughts (they don't keep the viewer in mind anyway), I'd rather you'd read the review at this URL:

http://imaginariumofdrparnassus.com/blog/2…

Even "Christianity Today" gave "Parnassus" a thumb's up. In fact, the NY "Times" supported Gilliam's latest effort...though the readers were more enthusiastic.

My advise to you all: see this flim again...and do a little bit of reading: the "eternal story" being told by the good doctor is an ancient myth...that had been told in many ancient cultures...

People not understanding this film...also failed to understand "El Topo" when it first debuted.

Nuff sed.

Posted by nadienunca on 01/24/2010 at 8:19 PM

Re: “The Blind Side

The title of my review is, "Repairing 500 years of slavery with the movie, The Blind Side, while simultaneously fostering inter-racial Cougar/Oedipus complexes."
The movie The Blind Side officially repairs five hundred years of slavery, yeah! Finally there is a much needed football movie that just so happens to be a balm to white ruling class, and all southern white, guilt. Praises to the cast and crew for such a big accomplishment. The only criticism I have has to do with the title of the movie: A more fitting title might be, "Fostering the Inter-Racial Cougar Oedipal Complex," For those of you who don't know what a 'Cougar' is, here is a synopsis; A Cougar is an older woman who is on the "hunt" for a much younger, energetic, willing-to-do-anything male. Here's a refresher on what an Oedipus Complex is: It is a complex of the male desire to possess the mother sexually and to exclude the father. I don't know if the big football star / adoptee wanted to score with his white trophy mom. It is hard for me to give this movie a detailed and accurate review because I only saw the trailer; and I hope I am never forced to watch it on a bus or an airliner. The only person that I know who saw the movie was my elderly white neighbor (who happens to be a widow and a southerner). Her reviews were stunning. She held her heart and spoke of renewed inspiration. Normally when I see this neighbor she bemoans her loneliness and depressingly speaks of how much she misses her dead husband. But this movie, Wow, it had her smiling while simultaneously tearing happy tears from her eyes. She told me that I "must take my wife to it" and that, my "wife will love it!" I asked my newly inspired neighbor, partly out of curiosity but mostly to change the subject, if she had seen this other new movie called, "The Men Who Stare At Goats?" My elderly neighbor let go of her heart, made a gasp of exasperation, looked utterly shocked and said, "Why no, I would never see a movie like that!" When I walked into my apartment I told my wife about our neighbor's reaction. My wife said, "The movie is called 'the men who STARE at goats... NOT, the men who FUCK goats!"

0 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by crackedlibertybell on 11/25/2009 at 6:41 PM

Re: “Watchmen

If you like the graphic novel or the movie, I highly recommend the DVD (or iTunes download) of the motion comic. It's outstanding and unabridged.

Posted by Nite Owl III on 03/31/2009 at 12:54 PM

Re: “Watchmen

Can't wait to see this again. I'm not sure that it will appeal to the masses due to the length and depth but this certainly impressed me.

Posted by James Werner on 03/31/2009 at 11:46 AM

Re: “The Angels' Share

I couldn't disagree more with Colin Boyd's review of "Angel's Share" as "sad and disappointing". Having lived in a depressed city in Scotland in the 1970s, the Ken Loach's portrayal of the cycle of poverty and hopelessness in inner-city Glasgow is spot on. This makes it all the more heartwarming to see the lead character make the audacious leap out of this cycle. And it is not an easy move! I was on the edge of my seat during the brewery scene as he was siphoning the "Angel's Share" and felt the triumph of his struggle in the final scenes with his new family. The film was hilarious (especially if you are familiar with Scottish culture), touching, and entirely human. It is absolutely worth seeing! (Word of warning: The use of the F-word is prolific throughout the film, which may bother some viewers.)

Posted by Scot Dancer on 05/31/2013 at 2:39 PM

Re: “Splice

My review of Splice, a Review of a Modern Day Prometheus
http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/5…

Posted by robb1138 on 07/08/2010 at 3:53 PM

Re: “Zombieland

Frakking awesome!

Posted by Chubbs on 12/29/2009 at 6:21 PM

Re: “The Road

This is a very powerful and well realized film. No, it does not compare to the book, but that is not a fair comparison. The acting is excellent, the direction confident and true to the story, and the plot, although minimal, never fails to hold interest. The very ending didn't quite live up to the rest to my mind, but on the whole this is a first rate movie. In particular, fathers and sons should see it for the portrayal of the deep, if often unspoken bonds, between them.

Posted by Zlotty51 on 12/24/2009 at 12:47 PM

Re: “Mum's the Turd

Just wanted to send some kudos for the snappy headline. :P

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Ex-Arizonan on 06/17/2017 at 8:01 PM

Re: “Lamer Lame Lame

I saw it. A 21st-century version of "Network" it ain't.

Posted by Ex-Arizonan on 06/11/2017 at 12:16 AM

Re: “Starship Supers

James Gunn needs to come back to Tucson and make a movie about "Transportation"
the department he served so will before he became famous.
Mr. Jimi

Posted by Mr. Jimi on 05/12/2017 at 3:26 PM

Re: “Fate of the Bung Hole

I am bungholio!

I need TP for my cornhole!

Posted by Shut up Beavis! on 04/26/2017 at 8:02 AM

Re: “Fate of the Bung Hole

uh..this is the food column. Not the movie column

2 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by food not movie on 04/25/2017 at 10:25 PM

Re: “Going Out of Style

I enjoyed "Going in Style" very much! I am 80 years young, and the movie gently poked fun at our foibles without making us look like dithering idiots. It was a gentle and humane comedy! Mi Gusto!!!!!
DZ Sortland

5 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Deena Z Sortland on 04/13/2017 at 10:08 AM

Re: “Keeping It Reel

Oh, Bob. Regarding your review of "La La Land": Really? Original? I guess it's been some time since you've seen REAL classics that clearly inspired multiple facets of this film, like, say "An American in Paris," "Singin' in the Rain," "A Star is Born," the Astaire-Rogers oeuvre and lesser films like "Xanadu,"and "Fame." Emma Stone was very good, but Gosling nearly ruined the film with his saturnine presence; comparing him to Sinatra and Gene Kelly is just ludicrous. The film really needed the ebullience of a Gene Kelly or the dapper charm of a Fred Astaire to really make it fly. It also needed help in the writing department; the script elements certainly betray Chazelle's youth and lack of real-life experience. I lived in L.A. for more than two decades and I cannot recall another film that so heavily romanticizes the city and the lives of its characters. Most actors in L.A. never get (paid) work in films or TV, and the small percentage who do mostly get work in commercials and as (non-union) extras. Most would gladly eat out of dumpsters for months for the chance to get a SAG card. For Stone's character to apparently limit her auditions to film and TV work shows extreme naivete, at best.
The John Legend character's assertion that "Jazz is dying" is simply not true; jazz has enjoyed a small but healthy niche market since the decline of big bands in the '50s. Given that jazz clubs are few in L.A., and regularly feature established artists of the genre with a lot more experience than Gosling's character has, some of his character's actions and attitudes are largely preposterous. How can his character have any "depth," as you put it, since there's so little of his backstory revealed to the audience?
Walter Kirn wrote a recent piece in Harper's in which he concisely skewers nostalgia, a concept in which this film is drenched: "It [nostalgia] tells romantic lies. It breeds reactionary sentiments by glorifying and simplifying what was and devaluing what is."

2 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by Starcommand on 01/10/2017 at 12:20 AM

Re: “No-Hate Musical

"Her raven hair is going to draw a lot of Ann Margaret [sic] comparisons here..." Isn't raven hair black? I see auburn hair here (and in pictures of Ann-Margret as well).

3 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Ex-Arizonan on 12/18/2016 at 10:51 PM

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