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Re: “Libraries Trump Hate

My fellow library advocates might be interested in a plan for a privately funded national library endowment, which among other things would at least help cushion libraries against the stupidities of short-sighted politicians:

LibraryEndowment.org

Articles about our plan have appeared in the Washington Post, Christian Science Monitor, Library Journal and elsewhere.

Sadly, the Gates Foundation is actually winding down its Global Libraries initiative. We need to reverse this via a multi-donor endowment. The .0000000001 percent could create it with just a speck of a speck of the billionaires' spare change.

Here is contact information for the Gates Foundation:

http://www.gatesfoundation.org/Who-We-Are/General-Information/Contact-Us

Educate Mr. Gates about our needs!

David Rothman
Davidrothman@pobox.com

Posted by David Rothman on 04/27/2017 at 8:14 AM

Re: “Editor's Note

It is difficult to leave a job you love, but your new job will be rewarding. Bringing change to Arizona is needed. And the grass roots is where it happens. Good luck and keep up the good work.
Here's to a brighter future.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Jesse on 04/27/2017 at 8:03 AM

Re: “Danehy

Tammy doesn't like the N.F.L. draft, so that makes it an abomination. Nobody should watch it because she doesn't like it. Could you imagine NEVER being effective at your job? You ought to know.

Posted by CW13 on 04/27/2017 at 7:48 AM

Re: “Hell Yes!

Why is this not a Bond Election rather than a Sales Tax? As the article points out, the 2012 Bond Election Moneys were properly spent.
The problem that I have with the Sales Tax is that from the Beginning of the Year (January 1, 2017) All Sales Tax Collections are now processed through the Arizona Department of Revenue in Phoenix. And we know how much Phoenix and the State want to take the Tucson and Pima County funds to be used in other parts of the State. (Where are all of our HURF Funds?)
Even the Chamber says the City has been spending the Bond Funds properly.

This election should be a Bond Election rather than a Sales Tax Election.

Posted by Charles Smith on 04/27/2017 at 7:47 AM

Re: “Editor's Note

Congratulations on your tenure at the Weekly and I can't wait to see what you do in your new position.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Laura Fitzgerald on 04/27/2017 at 7:47 AM

Re: “Hell Yes!

Well, the ultimate reason we have lousy roads is a car culture that is incredibly wasteful and virtually impossible to maintain.
To show how ingrained this culture is, we have the spectacle of the local progressive paper trumpeting the "vital" need to spend 100's of millions more on it. And what are we buying? Cars and trucks for police and fire as well as the roads themselves.
All this in order to cross increasingly long miles of sprawl which looks like everywhere else: mostly covered with asphalt for cars to drive and park.

1 like, 1 dislike
Posted by bslap on 04/27/2017 at 6:09 AM

Re: “Editor's Note

Congrats Mari! Thanks for everything you do. Break a leg at the YMCA!

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Tucson Sarah on 04/27/2017 at 5:48 AM

Re: “Editor's Note

Congratulations and good luck to you Mari!

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Sheila Wilensky on 04/27/2017 at 5:27 AM

Re: “Hell Yes!

Vote NO on tax increase. We never get what they promise. Don't be fooled again. This City needs change of leadership.

3 likes, 4 dislikes
Posted by David on 04/27/2017 at 5:26 AM

Re: “Danehy

Asshole.

1 like, 1 dislike
Posted by Lorenzo daPonte on 04/27/2017 at 4:09 AM

Re: “Once Again, It's Time to Deconstruct the U.S. News "Best High Schools" Rankings

Some feel that education is not a game and should not be largely about learning how to anticipate what corporate employees want you to answer on machine graded multiple choice tests. The "skills" required to successfully complete those kinds of tasks have little to do with what high quality liberal arts colleges will be asking students to do: read and interpret complex texts, conduct and analyze research, think critically, and write well and at length. I've been a teacher in both private and public schools and a parent at UHS and at a college prep private. My concerns about UHS are not a case of "sour grapes." My UHS student took 9 AP exams and got 4s and 5s on all of them. He had a higher than 4.0 weighted GPA and perfect Board scores in math. He's a bright, hard working kid and is doing well in college, but he had to learn some of the things in college that his sibling who attended a college prep private school had solidly in place before the end of his junior year in high school. Why is this? Because the curricula were better in the private school and the faculty and administration understood the role that faculty should play in designing interdisciplinary, complex projects that draw on and developed a much broader range of skills than a multiple choice test or a cookie-cutter essay question ever could.

The critiques of AP cram curricula and the doubts expressed RE the legitimacy of media-generated rankings like US News and World Report you read here and elsewhere are not about putting hard working students down. Among educators, these discussions are about understanding what it actually benefits students most to spend their time doing and how we can give them the best kind of preparation possible both for college-level work and to be constructive citizens and strong contributors in our communities.

Sorry to say it, but in this country we seem to want everything to be easy and cheap. Public is cheaper than private and cramming for a multiple choice test is a lot easier than conducting original research or writing an excellent essay. Easier for the teachers, and easier for the students. Unfortunately for the kids enrolled in these cram programs, it is also considerably less valuable educationally.

5 likes, 5 dislikes
Posted by Cramming for APs is not college preparatory. on 04/26/2017 at 4:25 PM

Re: “Once Again, It's Time to Deconstruct the U.S. News "Best High Schools" Rankings

My son went to UHS and he has a first class intellect they helped develop. I did not ever see him working simply to memorize useless information. How is "gaming the system" any different from simply playing the game, the game of life. If you want an academic, intellectual curriculum you by and large have to take tests to measure achievement. There are other ways, but they are pretty much alternative models, which have their own place, but are not part of a standard public school system. Any way you cut it, the acheivements of UHS and Basis are pretty awesome and for all these kids' hard work, I hear a lot of cynical adults putting them down.

6 likes, 7 dislikes
Posted by Luckyone on 04/26/2017 at 2:09 PM

Re: “Once Again, It's Time to Deconstruct the U.S. News "Best High Schools" Rankings

The real story is that the all-AP curricula that successfully game the system to win these awards do not work as valid forms of college preparation, but that's a story David Safier has for four solid years refused to touch, to the detriment of students subjected to these abusive programs and to the detriment of parents who look to education commenters in the media to try to understand which schools will most benefit their students. It's especially sad when EDUCATORS like Safier fail to use their media platforms to disabuse the public about the actual quality of the College Board / AP racket.

I see University High has successfully climbed up a few notches again. They did that in part by adding two inflexible AP requirements to the FRESHMAN curriculum and by adding a pre-freshman year summer boot camp program where they try to give their hapless recruits the "skills" needed to cram for mindless multiple choice tests. Also by requiring seniors to register for a full course load including many AP classes whether or not they needed these classes to meet graduation requirements.

Many in the media and politics seem to be intent on disparaging and undermining the decent private educational programs left and the families using them. The charter- and district-connected political networks haven't found a way to profit from small scale, locally controlled Independent Schools or from schools affiliated with the Roman Catholic Church, so economic disincentives must remain in place to discourage constituents from using these kinds of institutions. Meanwhile, in terms of the actual educational value of programs in publicly funded schools, charters and districts are engaging in a race to the bottom to see who can more completely transition to a corporatized, mindless and superficial memorization-and-regurgitation factories first.

Hurray for "democracy." (Corporatocracy?) It's producing great results these days, across the board.

7 likes, 7 dislikes
Posted by David Safier continues to avoid real EDUCATION reporting. on 04/26/2017 at 10:40 AM

Re: “Good, Available Child Care Benefits Society

Rat T. is a female. Keep trying. Maybe one day you'll get something right. But I doubt it.

0 likes, 6 dislikes
Posted by CW13 on 04/26/2017 at 10:35 AM

Re: “Once Again, It's Time to Deconstruct the U.S. News "Best High Schools" Rankings

Tucson should be damn proud to have these most incredible schools. No one is required to attend, but if you do you get a world class intense education FOR FREE! But people need to complain about something...

4 likes, 12 dislikes
Posted by Luckyone on 04/26/2017 at 9:34 AM

Re: “Editor’s Note

I've learned a lot during the last few years from reading the comment streams on Safier's blog and on selected other pieces in the Weekly. I appreciate those who take the time to explain their reasoning and how they look at things, especially when I disagree with them politically. It helps me understand the diversity of opinions in local politics and what beliefs (and sometimes fears) certain policy preferences are based on.

The commenter above seems to comment frequently and has a very distinct style, but I've never been able to get a clear view of what he or she believes, beyond that the appropriate way to respond to anyone who questions any point of liberal orthodoxy is to use insults and assertions not backed up by any valid arguments or evidence. One trope is, while insulting another commenter, to assert that the commenter being insulted lacks love and / or compassion. The hypocrisy doesn't seem to register.

Interesting. Puts a new, ironic spin in the term "liberal," doesn't it? As does the Weekly's pervasive failure to delete comments that involve insults and name-calling, in direct violation of their own clearly stated "Comments Policy." Kind of like when TUSD reps say the district puts the wellbeing of the kids and teachers first. It doesn't take a whole lot of observation to recognize the betrayals and inconsistencies.

4 likes, 4 dislikes
Posted by Hypocrisy should end, too, but, sadly, it won't. on 04/26/2017 at 9:33 AM

Re: “Once Again, It's Time to Deconstruct the U.S. News "Best High Schools" Rankings

If you want to prove a point and get the public to start thinking the way you want them to do all you have to do is create the illusion with smoke and mirrors. It's especially easy when you are pulling all the strings and pushing all the buttons to make your thingamabob look more beautiful and so much more intelligent and worthy than the other whatchamacallit. Republicans use this ruse over and over and it seems to work because the public believes everything at face value and never pulls back the curtain to reveal the phony behind it. If you trust anything that a Republican supports then you are already too far gone to redeem. There are only two motivators for Republicans and they are POWER and MONEY. They do not know how to govern, just to rule. They have the compassion of an iguana and as a group they are more cohesive than a band of fire-ants regardless of whether their objectives are right or wrong. The day that I trust ANY Republican is the day they pry my computer from my dead, cold hands.

7 likes, 9 dislikes
Posted by Beneal Good on 04/26/2017 at 9:11 AM

Re: “The Skinny

Raul's picture next to "skinny", now that's irony.

0 likes, 7 dislikes
Posted by CW13 on 04/26/2017 at 8:02 AM

Re: “Once Again, It's Time to Deconstruct the U.S. News "Best High Schools" Rankings

This is education culture. Test scores, test scores, test scores.

Yet, for 20 years the academic gains, the productivity, of American schools have gone down.

Education is substantially more complex than the average policy makers believes.

Focusing on test scores doesn't work.

It doesn't even work for BASIS. Less than half their graduates go on to graduate from college.

9 likes, 7 dislikes
Posted by jhuppent@hotmail.com on 04/26/2017 at 7:57 AM

Re: “Good, Available Child Care Benefits Society

Ummm ummmm ummm. Rat T in disguise.

5 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Rat T should know that he exposes himself by repeating himself. on 04/26/2017 at 7:50 AM

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