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Re: “Over Stepping Bounds

There seems to be some confusion over whether " NO ONE in the U.S. Border Patrol can legally give anyone "permission" to operate contrary to the law" or not.

Why was a Border Patrol Agent transporting 110 lbs of cocaine in his rental car trunk to Chicago?
See: http://nypost.com/2015/11/24/cops-find-110-pounds-of-cocaine-in-us-border-patrol-agents-car/

Why did the former DHS Inspector General, Tomshek (previously a 23 yr. veteran of the Secret Service) stated in a an interview that between 5 and 10 percent of border agents and officers are actively corrupt or were at some point in their career".

see: https://www.revealnews.org/article-legacy/ousted-chief-accuses-border-agency-of-shooting-cover-ups-corruption/

Why were the 43 College student protestors from Ayotzinapa Guerero disappeared, some from a school bus after it was riddled with bullets by the Mexican Army and Fed. Police; a school bus that has been reported to have previously traveled to Chicago without students; a bus that passed through US CBP twice? What kind of business is there between Guerrero and Chicago? One report linked it to the kind of business that transports the same white substance in the trunk of the BP officer.
(see: http://www.univision.com/noticias/noticias-de-mexico/revelan-que-policia-federal-y-ejercito-participaron-en-ataque-contra-alumnos-de-ayotzinapa).

Is that part of the law you speak of, or is that part of " some highly-questionable unsigned written agreement" . The students were shot while in the bus with machine guns in the hands of Fed. Mexican police and Army, rrportedly to protect a Cartel's goods. I don't think there is anything "warm and fuzzy" about why those murders happened, do you? But read on, if this appears unrelated . . . .

Immigrants principally leave Guatemala, Honduras, and Southern Mexico because they are pushed off their land by agricultural plantations ensured by NAFTA and CAFTA, because as their rural economies then collapse the drug Cartels move in, and because free trade has guaranteed weak , small , ineffectual governments there (keep tuned into that), they also want to join their family here who worked in places largely (but not completely) eschewed by us. 75% of all farm labor in the US is Mexican (Dept. of Labor 2005). And yes I come from a farm state.

And by the way, an aid station was set up in Nogales in Sonora, Mexico at the border, and it was received well by local Mexican authorities. There is no "thrill" in seeing a beat down immigrant, many who tell of loosing a companion to death in the desert. Many receive food and medical aid every day in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, by volunteers, people not paid.

Those who favor those policies in Central American and Mexico, the cause of migration, also often support the security and detention industries, or the remedy, here at home. Are you one of them?

Curious that. We once had agricultural laws that operated like those in Central American and Mexico. When small farmers were used for labor and they completed their contracts in the South, but usury fees and bank indebtedness "freed up their land", and dispossessed them as the large agricultural estates (former plantations), then bought them for a pittance. That is a form of a cartel. Most of those workers migrated (there is that " illegal" word again) to the north.

In Guatemala and Honduras, when agricultural workers finish their contract, if they try to stay on productive land in order to grow crops to live, the police are called, the dogs are set loose, and the "law" is applied there.

Here those laws were equally legislated sometime ago, Jim Crow.

Posted by Stone Garden on 06/23/2017 at 12:52 AM

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