Good Deeds

Monday, October 2, 2017

9th Annual Pink Hard Hat Campaign

Posted By on Mon, Oct 2, 2017 at 12:39 PM

Over 525 people stand together to create a human Pink Hard Hat Ribbon on Sept 29 as part of EMCOR's ninth annual "Protect Yourself. Get Screened Today" campaign. The event, at Banner Health's new construction site, launched Breast Cancer Awareness Month. - ROCKY BAIER
  • Rocky Baier
  • Over 525 people stand together to create a human Pink Hard Hat Ribbon on Sept 29 as part of EMCOR's ninth annual "Protect Yourself. Get Screened Today" campaign. The event, at Banner Health's new construction site, launched Breast Cancer Awareness Month.
A human Pink Hard Hat Ribbon was created by over 525 people on the Banner Health construction site on Friday, Sept. 29, launching Breast Cancer Awareness Month. The ninth annual event was run by EMCOR Group Inc. to promote their "Protect Yourself. Get Screened Today," campaign.

The 525 people were made up by construction workers and employees from the major companies working on the construction of the Banner Health hospital: EMCOR/University Mechanical & Engineering Contractors, Inc. (UMEC), Banner Health, and Sundt/DPR Construction.

They join thousands of other EMCOR employees around the U.S. who will wear pink hard hats in October to promote getting screened.

Construction workers listen to speakers at EMCOR's 9th annual "Protect Yourself. Get Screened Today" campaign. They also watched event plaques be presented to Tom Dickson, CEO of the University Medical Center; Ian McDowell, IP for Sundt Construction; and Brian Brown, Project Executive for DPR Construction. - ROCKY BAIER
  • Rocky Baier
  • Construction workers listen to speakers at EMCOR's 9th annual "Protect Yourself. Get Screened Today" campaign. They also watched event plaques be presented to Tom Dickson, CEO of the University Medical Center; Ian McDowell, IP for Sundt Construction; and Brian Brown, Project Executive for DPR Construction.

Speakers at the program all urged people to let everyone know to get tested, especially because of their personal connection to someone who had cancer.

"For me personally, my wife was diagnosed with cancer in the early part of this summer," DPR Construction Project Executive Brian Brown said. "We went through the process of doctors, biopsies, surgery and radiation treatment all summer long and now she's cancer free. If she had not done her annual breast cancer screening she would not be a breast cancer survivor."

Brad Thornton, President/CEO of UMEC, stressed early screening, especially because he saw both sides of what happened if the disease is caught early and late.

"My sister wasn't as proactive; her road was devastating," Thornton said. "She survived it, but it was very difficult for her. My mother-in-law attacked it, and she had the early detection and it made all the difference."

Besides getting the message to people who could be at risk of cancer, this event also helped the construction workers realize how important their work is.

"We had 500 people out there today that were working on this building," Thornton said. "For them to understand that the quality and care they take in installing their work in this building is going to make a huge difference. It's great that they can take away from this event and go up there and apply it to their work."

Thornton was also excited to be able to take new discoveries in medicine and put them to use to help people in the community.

After the event, construction workers were allowed to keep the pink hard hats to use as they built the new branches of the Banner University Medical Center.

"Many of our employees wear hard hats on a daily basis for personal protection, and we're proud of their commitment to wear an EMCOR/University Mechanical Pink Hard Hat in October to raise awareness for breast cancer, reminding women and men they can help protect themselves by getting screened," Thornton said.

Employees from EMCOR Group Inc., University Mechanical & Engineering Contractors, Sundt/ DPR Construction, and Banner Health stand beside pink hard hats, waiting to form the largest human ribbon in Arizona. They join workers all over the country in supporting early breast cancer screening, who will don pink hard hats in hospitals, shopping malls, and other construction sites. - ROCKY BAIER
  • Rocky Baier
  • Employees from EMCOR Group Inc., University Mechanical & Engineering Contractors, Sundt/ DPR Construction, and Banner Health stand beside pink hard hats, waiting to form the largest human ribbon in Arizona. They join workers all over the country in supporting early breast cancer screening, who will don pink hard hats in hospitals, shopping malls, and other construction sites.

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Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Jogger Plans Half-Day Run To Support No More Deaths

Posted By on Wed, Jul 26, 2017 at 3:45 PM

jerryschusterphoto.jpg
Ultra runner Jerry Schuster calls himself a glutton for punishment: Standard 26.2-mile marathons just aren't long enough for him.

On Saturday, July 29, he'll be doing a 12-hour run starting at 8 a.m. in order to raise money and awareness for No More Deaths, a humanitarian organization that works to reduce the deaths and suffering along the U.S./Mexico border.

The 62-year-old teacher has been on the ultra-long distance scene for years, participating in events like the Arizona 6-Day Race in Douglas. But at a certain point, he decided that, if he was going to be running dozens and dozens of miles anyway, he might as well do it for a cause. Many of the students that he works with are of Hispanic descent; he said they sometimes share disheartening stories about family members being pulled over or racially profiled.

"I'm hearing all of this hate-filled rhetoric against people with different backgrounds," he said.

This isn't the first time Schuster has done a run for a cause. He's done several 48-hour runs around the UA campus in support of refugees. When a major earthquake hit Nepal in 2015, he worked with the university's Nepalese Student Foundation to do a 24-hour run around Fourth Avenue. Though it was put together quickly and received little media exposure, the run still raised $2,500, simply from people coming up to the students at their table and asking what was going on.

This "do the damn thing" approach is historically Schuster's style. Rather than collecting per-mile or per-hour pledges, he just starts running and hopes it will get people's attention.

"The way that I envision the fundraising effort is to make use of the system already there," he said. "Why invent the wheel when they already have something that works?"

Schuster said he had several motivators for wanting to make a difference in immigration reform. He spoke about a friend, a fellow runner, who used to live in Douglas. While out on long training runs, he was frequently hassled by border patrol agents, even though he was a U.S. citizen. During World War II, some of Schuster's Jewish great aunts and uncles died in Auschwitz. He said he sees parallel treatment of immigrants today.

"When I hear about things like these raids along the border, it starts setting alarm bells off in my head," he said. "History has a way of repeating itself."

If you want to support No More Deaths, you can make a contribution here.

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Wednesday, April 19, 2017

The Pima County Fair is Back and You Don't Want to Miss It

Posted By on Wed, Apr 19, 2017 at 5:30 PM

FILE PHOTO
  • File photo
It’s that time of year again folks: The Pima County Fair is back which, for most, is the official kickoff to summer in Tucson.

Here’s your guide on some quick information you should know before attending. 
  • The Pima County Fair will take place April 20-30. General admission is $8, ages 6 to 10 are $4, and kids who are 5-years-old and under are free.

  • The annual fair is adding activities to their list with more concerts, food, rides, and exhibits. Popular events from previous years are back such as the butterfly exhibit, John Shaw’s Freak Show, and the Wild About Monkeys exhibit.

  • Concerts during the full ten days of the fair will include performances by T-Pain with Naughty by Nature, Rockfest with Cinderella’s Tome Keifer and Winger, Josh Turner, Jack Hanna’s Into the Wild Live!, Lil Yachty, Tanya Tucker, and many more.

  • If you are still a kid at heart who now also has a kid, the carnival section is where you want to be. Two types of carnival sections will be available for everyone: The Kiddie Land Carnival is for families with younger children and The Tucson Weekly Carnival is designed for those adventure-seeking Tucsonans.

  • Guests can purchase a wristband in order to go on all the rides or you can purchase individual tickets at the ticket booth. The fair is offering a “Fun Pass” to fair goers which acts as a debit card and once the card is scanned before going on a ride, the number of “tickets” for that ride is deducted from the card.

  • For all the horse lovers out there, the fair will be having horse shows that include performances from competition horses such as hunter/jumper, Arabian, reining horse, paint horse, quarter horse, and a lot more.

  • And, as for the real reason why anyone goes to fairs, the food is going to be great. There are going to be many options to choose from, so come hungry. For annual fair goers, you’ll see new food stations too so it’s a win-win for everyone. Some popular foods to expect there are Lisa’s Sonoran Hot Dogs, Mustards Café, Candy Factory, Big Dogs, Dutchmen’s Funnel Cakes, Squeezers, Texas Steak out, and Get Pickled.

  • The newbies will include Sleek Greek, Sweet Cheeks Deep Fried Sweets, Hot Dog on a Stick, and Tommy D’s Burgers—yum.

  • The Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona and Greater Vail Community Resources are partnering to collect food for their organizations and as a reward to whoever brings in three cans of food before 3 p.m. on Thursday, April 20 and Sunday, April 30, they will get free admission into the fair so be a good person and donate food to help feed the hungry.

  • An annual livestock auction will be taking place under the county fair Ramada during the second weekend. Large animals will be auctioned on Saturday, April 29 at 11:45 a.m. and small animals will be auctioned the next day at 10:30 a.m.

  • Also, during the second weekend of the fair is the Grand Canyon Pro- Rodeo Association Rodeo at 1 p.m. in Manny’s Area.
Luckily for you, we can help you get in for free. Enter here, and we'll get in touch with winners throughout the fair. These passes are good for any night.

Main gate hours will open on Monday to Friday at 1 p.m. and on weekends at 10 a.m. All the exhibits open at the same time as the main gate but each hall close at different hours of the night.

The carnival hours will be Monday to Friday at 3 p.m. and on weekends at 11 a.m.

The fair will be located at 11300 S. Houghton Rd. which is one-mile south of the I-10 and Houghton Rd. exit. Parking is $5.

Be there or be square.

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Monday, February 13, 2017

Painting for Pups

Posted By on Mon, Feb 13, 2017 at 10:30 AM

Spend the night of Saturday, Feb. 25 from 6-9 p.m. helping the sweet companions at Pima Animal Care Center find their forever homes and getting crafty at the same time. Win-win.

click image TIPSY PICASSOS
  • Tipsy Picassos
An art class sponsored by Tipsy Picassos will teach you how to paint this "Starry Night Dog" masterpiece for $35. All art supplies are included in that price, and food and drink will be available for purchase at the event. Pima Animal Care Center receives $10 of every purchase.
You can purchase your tickets here: https://www.paypal.me/tipsypicassos/35, and make sure you write you're planning to attend "Starry Night Dog" in the notes.

What could be more fun and rewarding than helping the pups at PACC who are as adorable as the one you'll be painting? Maybe only adopting a new best friend, too.

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Thursday, February 2, 2017

Do the Math: Teachers Solve the Problem

Posted By on Thu, Feb 2, 2017 at 11:00 AM

I recently came across an ABC News video by Eliza Murphy of a fifth grade English teacher in North Carolina who completes personalized handshakes with each of his students before they enter his classroom. The teacher, Barry White Jr., and his obvious connection to his students prompted me to consider how influential of a role teachers play in children's lives growing up, and how too many of them are under appreciated.



I've always thought it was a shame that teachers don't get paid as much as they're worth. Many of the teachers and professors I've had so far have been integral in shaping my character, my interests and my education. They teach so much more than math, writing and science. They often have to take on the many roles of a mentor, counselor and personal cheerleader for their students.

The most significant conclusion I came to after seeing this video, however, is that I wish videos such as this one didn't have to be newsworthy. I wish all teachers cared as deeply for their students' futures as much as White clearly does. Most of all, I wish this country as a whole would start to appreciate teachers as much as they deserve. I give kudos to White and his dedication to his students, but the fact of the matter is that there are teachers all across the country who feel the same way about their classes, yet their efforts often go unrecognized. Students of all ages and all backgrounds need to be told and shown someone believes in them and wants them to succeed. After all, our future presidents, surgeon generals, district attorneys, farmers and yes, future teachers, are being molded every day.

Can we make thanking our teachers an everyday practice now?

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Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Create a Masterpiece, Give the Gift of Art

Posted By on Tue, Sep 20, 2016 at 8:43 AM

GIFTED CUSTOM ART
  • Gifted Custom Art
Creative Juice Art Bar (6530 E. Tanque Verde Road) and Gifted Custom Art will team up on Saturday, Oct. 1 to raise money for the local Boys and Girls Clubs in Tucson. You don't have to be a modern Monet to attend this painting philanthropy event.

The concept is simple: Gifted provides a photo for you and your friends to convert into a painted masterpiece and Creative Juice gives you a place to do it. Registration to the Gifted Giving event is $55 per person and every registration gives one painting experience to a child at the Boys and Girls Club of Tucson - Frank and Edith Morton Clubhouse.    

For more information on how to register, click here

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Monday, July 11, 2016

Arizona Theatre Company Feels the Love—But Needs a Lot More

Posted By on Mon, Jul 11, 2016 at 9:00 AM

temple_of_music_and_art_in_tucson_az.jpg
Last we heard, Arizona Theatre Company had two weeks to come up with two million dollars, otherwise the theatre would be forced to close its doors for its next season. The announcement came last week in a press release, saying the company needed the cash or an entire year of reorganizing in the hopes they could raise the curtain the year after.

On July 8, ATC sent out another press release to announce that nearly 360 donors from Tucson and Phoenix have pledged a quarter million ($220,000 to be exact) in a fundraising effort to save the 2016-17 season. In addition to the 213 Tucson donors and 145 from Phoenix, an anonymous donor pledged a separate $100,000 donation to have the deadline for closure extended to July 15. Mike Kasser, board member at ATC, has also agreed to match the funds if one million can be raised before the deadline.

Members of ATC's governing bodies said in the release that the support from the Tucson and Phoenix communities is cause for hope, but they are reaching a critical timeframe that needs to be met otherwise "options are very limited," according to  ATC Managing Director Billy Russo. 

"Either we go on temporary hiatus to restructure the business model or close our doors," he said. "We are hopeful that the people of Arizona won’t let that happen.”

To donate to the cause or for more information, visit www.arizonatheatre.org.

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Monday, June 20, 2016

Staying Engaged on World Refugee Day

Posted By on Mon, Jun 20, 2016 at 3:15 PM

A group of Syrian children at an informal settlement in Lebanon's Bekaa Valley. - JENNIFER HIJAZI
  • Jennifer Hijazi
  • A group of Syrian children at an informal settlement in Lebanon's Bekaa Valley.

Although the forced migration crisis seems a world away on Mediterranean shores, our borderland home is just as crucial an area for refugee and migrant rights. Having seen just a piece of the international crisis in the Middle East this past month, it is apparent that the scope of this problem is constantly evolving and has many faces, many of which are slowly losing the eye of global concern. According to a representative from UNICEF in Beirut, 44,000 Syrian women give birth every year, steadily increasing the population of vulnerable youth that wander the streets and valleys of Lebanon, just a fraction of the 12.5 million Syrians now displaced from their homes.

On our own border, according to the Pew Research Center, apprehensions of unaccompanied minors and families shot up to 78 percent this year. Mirroring our own surge, the number of unaccompanied minors crossing into Europe reached 96,000 in 2015, a number that accounts for almost half of the total number of minors crossing since 2008.

Although arguably everyday should be a reminder of the many displaced lives in our international community, today, June 20, is World Refugee Day. As such, it is particularly important to remember our shared responsibility to remain committed to the struggles of forced migrants on our own border and beyond.

Today, pay a visit to Iskashitaa and learn about their volunteer opportunities, drop off clothes to the Islamic Center of Tucson, or call WorldCare about sustained donations. If anything, read a few more stories about the plights of refugees today. If enough concerned news consumers continue to keep the conversation going on the epidemic of displacement, then we might not need an international refugee day to remind us of the crises at our own backdoors.

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Staff Pick

Jurassic Park

This pulse-pounding thrill-ride that made the whole world go dino-crazy scaring the living beejeesus out of moviegoers… More

@ Loft Cinema Fri., Oct. 20, 10-11:45 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 21, 10-11:45 p.m. 3233 E. Speedway Blvd.

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