Friday, February 16, 2018

Two Dozen Ways To Have Fun This Weekend!

Posted By on Fri, Feb 16, 2018 at 4:20 PM

The ponies are back at Rillito Racetrack.
  • The ponies are back at Rillito Racetrack.
Wyatt Earp: Tombstone Brewing Company is pairing up with Casa Video Film Bar to give an authentic feel of the Wild West. See? Even films can get involved in Arizona Beer Week. Watch Kevin Costner play perhaps the most famous sheriff of Cochise County, and battle it out at the O.K. Corral. Or as the cool kids call it, the Okie Dokie Corral. 7 to 10 p.m. Friday, Feb. 16. 2905 E. Speedway Blvd.

Sans Soleil: Grace St. Paul's Episcopal Church is opening up your mind with one of the most acclaimed documentaries of all time: Sans Soleil (or "Sunless"). This experimental documentary is part stock footage, part travelogue, part essay film, all combined to examine memory and what it means to be human. 6:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 16. 2331 E. Adams St. Details here.

The Art of Truffles: No, not the thousand-dollar mushrooms people hunt for in the Black Forest. You'll learn how to make some awesome chocolatey treats, courtesy of Tamara from Chantilly Tea Shoppe. And all the while you're learning, you get to sip some wine! 5 to 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 16. 7090 N. Oracle Road.

Chinese New Year Dinner: The Carriage House is kicking off the Chinese new year with a five-course meal made specially by chef Devon Sanner. Included with the massive meal is a welcome cocktail and wine. And if all of that isn't enough, there is also a special performance by the Jade Lion. 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 16. 125 S. Arizona Ave. For reservations, email Megan@DOWNTOWNKitchen.com.

TEDxUofA: Uncharted. The first annual TEDxUofA conference is here! You'll hear from geologist, educator and writer Jess Kapp in her talk "Say Yes," about taking risks for the sake of self discovery. Shepard Robbins will talk about the dark side of comics in his talk "Under the Page." Biosystems engineering professor Joel Cuello talk about using amplified intelligence to achieve more sustainable methods of food development in "AI Does Food." Marketing assistant professor Caleb Warren will talk about why we love the products we do in "What Makes Things Cool." Jonathan Bean will talk about the shifting nature of markets in "Demand Less." Hester Oberman, Ph.D, will talk about religion and philosophy in "Belief Out of the Closet." And Nolan Cabrera, a scholar of race and racism, will talk about the pitfalls of privilege in "White Immunity." 3 to 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 16. Crowder Hall, 1017 N. Olive Road. $20 GA, $20 VIP, $10 student, $15 student VIP.

Rachmaninoff Rhapsody: Vadym Kholodenko, a Ukrainian pianist who won the 2013 Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, is making his TSO debut with Rachmaninoff's Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini. TSO Music Director José Luis Gomez commissioned a piece by former Young Composers Project student Anthony Constantino, and the piece, Luminosity's Witness, will make its world premiere at TSO. Also on the docket: Selections from Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet and Ginastera's Dances from Estancia ballet. 7:30 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 16 and 2 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 18. Details here.

Quilt Fiesta! Are you ready for the most wholesome festival this world has ever seen? Well, you'd better get ready. With vendors, quilt appraisals, a vintage quilt turning and a special kids section, it's a show with something for everyone. (Even if you're not INTO quilts, you're into being warm, right? And seeing people love what they do?) Plus, there's demonstrations on the modern quilt movement and crafting the perfect border. Guest speaker Dixie McBride will be giving two talks: "Garage Sale Heirlooms" and "Quilt Judges and Jurors: Who Are They?" Admission comes with a raffle ticket to win the award-winning quilt Star Light, Star Bright. Friday, Feb. 16 to Sunday, Feb. 18. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. $10 for one day, $20 for all three days (only available on Friday). Free for kids 14 and under. Details here.

TMA Annual Spring Artisans Market: More than 100 juried artists are coming together so that you can buy tons of beautiful things in one place. Pottery! Glass! Jewelry! Textiles! Fine art! You name it! This is also your last opportunity to see the museum's feature exhibition, Dress Matters: Clothing as Metaphor. Live performances by Andy Hersey and Shelly Hawkins Dance on Friday, Solidarity Sympa and Lisa O'Neill Saturday and Jazz Pyramid Scheme, ft. tidypaws, Dimitri Manos and Thøger Lund on Sunday. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, Feb. 16 to Sunday, Feb. 18. Tucson Museum of Art and Historic Block, 140 N. Main Ave. Free. The museum is free and open to the public during all three days of the market as well. Details here.

24 Hours in the Old Pueblo. This team relay and solo rider mountain bike event is one of the largest 24-hour events in the world. Yes, it literally lasts from noon on Saturday to noon on Sunday. While these maniacs are riding their bikes for longer than most of us have ever done anything continuously, we mere mortals can enjoy fun stuff too, like a Four Peaks Brewing beer garden, hot cocoa in the In-N-Out Burger Exchange Tent and a Maxis Tire Toss. 24 Hour Town is a tiny utopia that gets erected for the weekend (utopias can't last forever, you know) and that's where it's all going down. Friday, Feb. 16 to Sunday, Feb. 18. Starts at noon on Friday, 6 a.m. on Saturday and 7 a.m. on Sunday. Camping sites vary in cost, but most include a requirement that you bring some canned goods for a food drive.

Wizards. From the man who brought you the world's first X-rated animated film comes a psychedelic and fantastical vision of the future. Ralph Bakshi's animation certainly is unique, and so is this movie. Elves, Orcs, laser guns and all the bizarre pre-digital animation you could ask for. This movie was made just one year before he released the 1978 animated version of the Lord of the Rings, but rivals it in scope and scale. Loft Cinema, 3233 E. Speedway. 10 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 17. $6.

Battle of the Beers. Huss Brewing Company is heading over to Tap & Bottle for the second annual Ro Sham Beaux competition. It's a tough competition between the Barrel Aged Koffee Stout and the Imperial Chocolate Porter, and many more. Who will survive? You'll just have to show up to find out. 5:30 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 17. 403 N. Sixth Ave, suite 135. Details here.

Off the Vine Wine Festival. Wine takes over Steam Pump Ranch for a day. Not only will there be dozens of local wine tastings, but you get to talk with local winemakers and enjoy live music. Price of admission includes a commemorative glass and six tasting tickets. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 17. 10901 N. Oracle Road. Details here.

When Immigration Hits a Wall: Life in the Borderlands Location. In case the issue of immigration ever feels like it's getting too abstract for you, hear from three locals about what the changing landscape of immigration policy means for them. Mo Goldman, a Tucson immigration attorney, will talk about what's changed and what to expect going forward on the legal side of things. Loreno Verdugo, a community health adviser and coordinator for El Rio Health Center and coordinator of Ventanilla de Salud in the Mexican Consulate, will share stories about immigrants she's seen make their way to Tucson. Alejandro Ursua, a UA grad and DACA recipient who now works for Merrill Lynch Wealth Management, will share his own story of how the uncertain future affects his family. Hosted by the League of Women Voters of Greater Tucson. 9:30 a.m. to noon. Saturday, Feb. 17. Joel D. Valdez Library, 101 N. Stone, Lower Level 1 Meeting Room. Free.

Ansel Adams Public Celebration. On some level, aren't we all, always, celebrating the work of Ansel Adams? Here's a chance for us to do it all together, in the same place and at the same time. The Center for Creative Photography's new exhibit, Ansel Adams: Performing the Print, will open, and there will also be archival object tours (self guided-the best kind), vintage camera display and a presentation from Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist and pal of Ansel Adams, David Hume Kennerly. Plus, cake! Noon to 4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 17. Center for Creative Photography, 1030 N. Olive Road. Free.

Tucson Take Back the Night. Singer songwriter Charlie King is playing at this event to raise funds for Take Back The Night, which will in turn raise awareness of sexual violence and provide support to survivors. You'll enjoy a free concert with Charlie, performances by musical guests including the Tucson Women's Chorus and a FREE mean Mexican meal catered by Maria Garcia of La Indita Restaurant. A raffle gives you the chance to donate to a good cause, and possibly take home some good stuff, like TBTN T-shirts, some local art, free tickets to shows or gift certificates to area businesses. 6 p.m. meal, 7 p.m. concert. Saturday, Feb. 17. Unitarian Universalist Church, 4831 E 22nd St. Free. Call Ted at 623-1688 or email its@theriver.com for more info. Details here.

Happy Birthday, Arizona! The ol' girl is 106, but we all know she doesn't look a day over 25. To celebrate our sweet state, Old Tucson is offering buy one, get one free admission, living history presentations, and some classic Old West entertainment to remind you that 106 is actually pretty old. A special flag ceremony at noon both Saturday and Sunday will be held to make sure Arizona's feeling extra loved. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 17 and Sunday, Feb. 18. Old Tucson, 201 S. Kinney Road.

Vigilante Days in Tombstone. Okay, yeah, this is a skip, hop and a jump outside of Tucson, but it'll be cool. There'll be tons of historical reenactments, the famous "Hanging Tree," a Geo Coin for geocaching and a chili cook. You can visit the Courthouse Museum, tour the Goodenough mine and ride a stagecoach around town. Plus, a fashion show by the Tucson Vigilettes, and the chance to enter a raffle to win a ROSSI Model 92, .45 caliber long colt lever action rifle and handmade case (just don't shoot your eye out). 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 17 and Sunday, Feb. 18. Allen Street in Tombstone, Arizona. Free entry. Details here.

Winter Meet at Rillito Park Racetrack. Everyone's favorite historic racetrack just started its Winter Meet last weekend, and there's five more weekends to go, including 12 live race days! This week on the docket, we have Military and First Responder Day on Saturday, Feb. 17 and Arizona VIP Day (government and civic leaders appreciation) on Sunday, Feb. 18. (Call them at 745-5486 to learn more about reserved seating). May the best horse and jockey win! The gates open at 10 a.m. on race days, with a post time of 1 p.m. 4502 N. First Ave. $5 GA, $10 Clubhouse admission.

Cruise, BBQ & Blues Festival and Car Show. If you're not into cars, this is a great chance to finally understand what all the hype is about. Over at SAACA, they're firm believers that automobiles are art - blending mechanics, design and science to produce beautiful, functional machines that have, in many ways, made the world feel like a smaller place. The event also features live blues music, barbecue and 20 different awards given in categories including Best Interior, Best Engine and People's Choice. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Oro Valley Marketplace, 12155 N. Oracle Road. $5. $1 discount for military and veterans, free for kids 10 and under. Tickets available at the door. Details here.

Cornelio Vega y Su Dinastia ain't your papa's norteña. His colorful accordion and mariachi-inspired guitar show he's a genre scholar, but his lyrics offer modern twists. In "El Problema," Vega's cooing the blues of a Sonoran kid with a hankering for guns and fast cars and not his family in el norte. The usual romantic viewpoint is love trumps all but Vega sings, "Se que nada es para siempre" (I know that nothing is forever). This kid-jaded take on traditional values, while paying tribute to the genre's roots, is subtly revolutionary. Vega made a name for himself on YouTube, where he's earned more than 58 million hits. And it's no wonder; he offers relatable, well-executed Mexican music, from the perspective of a boy who grew up witnessing heartaches and limitations of older, honest workingmen's lives lived along the problematic frontera. With Adriel Favela, Omar Ruiz, Jonatan Sanchez and Helen Ochoa. Tucson Expo Center, 3750 E. Irvington Road. Doors at 9 p.m. $50. General admission. All ages.

Dent May. Mayer Hawthorne most recently proved how smooth saxes, disco beats and pitch-corrected blue-eyed soul can make for intricately arranged sugar-pop. Dent May fell in line. But just as you're swept up by May's well-crafted, lounge-y creepers, the lyrics bum out: "Caviar days, plastic surgery nights/90210 with you by my side." Originally from Mississippi, Dent May mecca'd to L.A., where his gifted melodic sensibility (Silverlake's love affair with Brian Wilson, natch) got packaged in hipster cat T's and Spencer's hippie bling. Too bad 'cause songs like "Best Friend" and "Meet Me in the Garden" are gorgeous, yet ultimately insincere. It's music for folks too embarrassed to let themselves feel. Unlike, say, Frank Zappa, May doesn't lift a corner on his schtick to let listeners in on the joke. His cynicism feels unearned, the irony too poker-faced. Yes, Congress will be packed. With Moon King and Liquid Summer on Saturday, Feb. 17. Club Congress, 311 E. Congress. 7 p.m. $10. 16+. Details here.

Tucson Roadrunners. Our beloved hockey team has two home games this week against the Bakersfield Condors. Though both teams are avian, the roadrunners have the advantage of being more accustomed to doing battle on the ground, rather than in flight. At 7:05 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 17, you'll like $1 food night and the youth jersey giveaway, and at 4:05 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 19, you won't want to miss the fidget spinner giveaway. Tucson Arena, 260 S. Church Ave. $10 to $56+. Details here.

National Wine Day with Cheese Pairing. It seems like there's a national day for everything now. Who's making this stuff up? But a National Wine Day is perfectly alright by me. Certainly better than a National Left Sock Day, or whatever is coming up next. 1912 Brewing is celebrating the occasion with some of the best wine and cheese this side of Napa Valley. 3 to 5 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 18. 2045 N Forbes Blvd, suite 105. Details here.

TMC Sunrise at Old Tucson Trail Run. If you have to run on the dusty trails of Tucson, you might as well go big with it, and run a race that goes through Old Tucson Studios, a slice of the Old West. There's a men's 4-mile, a women's 4-mile and a family 1-mile, and everyone who registers gets a fee cowboy breakfast, and admission to Old Tucson for the day! (Your guests get special discounted pricing as well). And everyone registered gets free admission to the International Wildlife Museum for the day too. So honestly, you could just run a mile and wind up with a free breakfast and a free day at some of the coolest places in Tucson, which almost sounds too good to be true. Registration begins at 7 a.m. in the Old Tucson Parking lot. Women's start at 8 a.m. and men and family runs start at 9 a.m. Old Tucson Studios, 201 S. Kinney Road. $40 4-mile trail run and $25 1-mile run. Details here.

Kimya Dawson. Since Kimya Dawson left Moldy Peaches and blew up with "Loose Lips" (from the Juno soundtrack), she has quietly toured and recorded her quirksome folk-pop (and even made a smart, lovely album for toddlers). Gentle, basic guitars accompany her dense, multi-syllabic words, which are as earnestly unadonrned as they are funny and melancholy ("If you want to kill yourself/Remember that I love you/Call me up before you're dead/We'll make up some plans instead"). Her forlorn nursery rhymes are mostly open-hearted, and brave ones at that. When she veers whimsical ("I like my new bunny suit/It makes me feel cute"), it's the unwavering vocal sincerity that keeps her music from faltering. One gets the feeling that Dawson's best friends are still all imaginary and that a blanket tent in her bedroom (with a portable record player inside) is the only place she feels at home. With AJJ and Cesar Ruiz. Club Congress, 311 E. Congress. 7 p.m. $8-$10. All ages. Details here.

The Education of Bill Gates

Posted By on Fri, Feb 16, 2018 at 4:09 PM

COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA
  • Courtesy of wikimedia
Bill Gates made billions and billions of dollars in the field of computer technology, helping to transform the world in the process. He's an innovator. He's a disrupter. He's the savviest of savvy businessmen. He's been successful beyond anyone's wildest dreams of success or avarice.

So Gates thought, why not put his entrepreneurial genius and hundreds of millions of dollars a year to work innovating and disrupting and transforming the field of education? How hard can it be?

Pretty hard, he discovered.

Gates has been pouring money into his educational experiments in this country since 2000. Overall, I'd give his efforts a grade of C. Not much help, no grave harm. I'd give what he's learned about education a B. He now understands he doesn't know as much about education as he thought he did.

Bill and Melinda Gates released their annual letter answering The 10 Toughest Questions We Get. Question #2 is, "What do you have to show for the billions you’ve spent on U.S. education?" Their answer employs the couple's usual upbeat tone, but the efforts they describe are less than encouraging, especially given that, "Our foundation spends about $500 million a year in the United States, most of it on education."

A few telling excerpts from their answer:
"One thing we learned is that it’s extremely hard to transform low-performing schools."

"We have also worked with districts across the country to help them improve the quality of teaching. . . . But we haven’t seen the large impact we had hoped for."

"How did our teacher effectiveness work do on these three tests? Its effect on students’ learning was mixed."

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Laughing Stock: Chortling Chollas!

Posted By on Fri, Feb 16, 2018 at 1:00 PM

Killer Cathys perform in the Cactus Flower Comedy Festival Feb. 22 - 24 at TIM - JEREMY SHOCKLEY
  • Jeremy Shockley
  • Killer Cathys perform in the Cactus Flower Comedy Festival Feb. 22 - 24 at TIM

The Cactus Flower Comedy Festival of funny women kicks off at Tucson Improv Movement at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 22, with a set by FST (Female Storytellers), and runs through standup comedy, improvised sets and jams, bilingual improv, workshops, an all-gender jam, and more through Saturday, Feb. 24. The lineup includes teams from the UA, Unscrewed Theatre and Phoenix’s Torch Theatre as well as TIM.

Saturday at 9 p.m. “The Best Show, Period” benefits Project Period, the YWCA’s program to provide sanitary products to anyone in need. The program features The Riveters, TIM’s long-running, all-woman improv team; memoirist, poet and comedian Molly McCloy and Phoenix comedian Genevieve Rice, founder of the Bird City Comedy Festival.

Friday’s “Ladies Who Lead” improvises around stories told by Arizona gubernatorial candidate Kelly Fryer and others. Saturday’s 10:30 p.m. headlining set features L.A.’s punk Latina improv twins, Animal, and Portlandia alum Kristine Levine, the boundary-pushing Friday co-host of The Frank show on KLPX.

Details and reservations for all ten shows are at tucsonimprov.com .

Cactus Flower is the grand public debut of TIM’s new 414 E. 9th Street address, across from the Shanty and next to the Geronimo Hotel, in the same building as Revel Wine Bar. The move is a big step up for the theater, formerly located in a dilapidated garage next to D&D Pinball.

Improvements include air conditioning and heating, a space arrangement made to order, and next month. beer and alcohol service.

Says TIM executive producer Justin Lukasewicz, “The new theater has the vibe and amenities we need. The space feels really cool, and I think complements the high quality our shows. We should be able to serve liquor in time for our Improv Madness duo competition in March. That’s generally our most popular show every year. Two-person teams compete, and the audience votes for their favorites.”

Lukasewicz says the move also accommodates the growth of TIM comedy training programs. We launched our first Stand Up 101 this year. It sold out within two weeks, and the students loved it. We also have sketch, stand up, improv, and teen classes starting soon.

As for Cactus Flower, Lukaseswicz says, “We have a smart, talented group of females running the show on this. We've been thinking about what does year 5 or 10 of this festival look like, and how do we get there incrementally. I think that will make this fest a Tucson treasure for years to come.”

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Thursday, February 15, 2018

The Weekly List: 25 Things To Do In Tucson This Week

Posted By and on Thu, Feb 15, 2018 at 9:25 AM

Your Weekly guide to keeping busy in the Old Pueblo.

Panels

When Immigration Hits a Wall: Life in the Borderlands Location. In case the issue of immigration ever feels like it’s getting too abstract for you, hear from three locals about what the changing landscape of immigration policy means for them. Mo Goldman, a Tucson immigration attorney, will talk about what’s changed and what to expect going forward on the legal side of things. Loreno Verdugo, a community health adviser and coordinator for El Rio Health Center and coordinator of Ventanilla de Salud in the Mexican Consulate, will share stories about immigrants she’s seen make their way to Tucson. Alejandro Ursua, a UA grad and DACA recipient who now works for Merrill Lynch Wealth Management, will share his own story of how the uncertain future affects his family. Hosted by the League of Women Voters of Greater Tucson. 9:30 a.m. to noon. Saturday, Feb. 17. Joel D. Valdez Library, 101 N. Stone, Lower Level 1 Meeting Room. Free.

tedxuofa_marketing_posters_mountain.jpg
TEDxUofA: Uncharted. The first annual TEDxUofA conference is here! You’ll hear from geologist, educator and writer Jess Kapp in her talk “Say Yes,” about taking risks for the sake of self discovery. Shepard Robbins will talk about the dark side of comics in his talk “Under the Page.” Biosystems engineering professor Joel Cuello talk about using amplified intelligence to achieve more sustainable methods of food development in “AI Does Food.” Marketing assistant professor Caleb Warren will talk about why we love the products we do in “What Makes Things Cool.” Jonathan Bean will talk about the shifting nature of markets in “Demand Less.” Hester Oberman, Ph.D, will talk about religion and philosophy in “Belief Out of the Closet.” And Nolan Cabrera, a scholar of race and racism, will talk about the pitfalls of privilege in “White Immunity.” 3 to 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 16. Crowder Hall, 1017 N. Olive Road. $20 GA, $20 VIP, $10 student, $15 student VIP.


No One Told Me This Sh*t Was Going to be Hard! Well ain’t that the truth about just about everything in life. In this case, though, it’s about the ups and downs, failures and successes, trials and tribulations of being an entrepreneur and starting your own company. Hear from a panel of experts at this interactive event, including representatives from InHouse, the real estate software company. 5:30 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 15. Connect Coworking–Downtown Tucson Office Space, 33 South Fifth Ave. $5.

Art and Music

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Sonoran Seasons. This is easier to remember at this time of year, when we’re not all making frantic dashes from our air-conditioned houses to our air-conditioned cars, and burning out hands on our steering wheels, but Tucson actually has more than one season. In fact, it has five: winter, spring, fore-summer, summer monsoon and fall. Tohono Chul Park’s new gallery exhibit celebrates Tucson’s array of seasons, and of biological specimens. Featured artist Janet Windsor uses graphic design and stitching skills to create fiber artwork of desert seasons. Exhibit runs through Wednesday, April 18. Artist’s reception: 5:30 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 15. Curator’s Talk: 10 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 20 and Thursday, Feb. 22. Tohono Chul Park, 7366 Paseo del Norte. $13 adults, $10 students, seniors over 62 and military. $3 kids 5 to 12 and free for kids under 5.

Ansel Adams Public Celebration. On some level, aren’t we all, always, celebrating the work of Ansel Adams? Here’s a chance for us to do it all together, in the same place and at the same time. The Center for Creative Photography’s new exhibit, Ansel Adams: Performing the Print, will open, and there will also be archival object tours (self guided—the best kind), vintage camera display and a presentation from Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist and pal of Ansel Adams, David Hume Kennerly. Plus, cake! Noon to 4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 17. Center for Creative Photography, 1030 N. Olive Road. Free.

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Comedy, Beer, Theater & More: Eight Things To Do Today!

Posted By on Thu, Feb 15, 2018 at 2:00 AM

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Beer Week: Ermanos Craft Beer & Wine Bar.
Mexican food, BBQ, and beer? It's like they rolled Tucson into a perfect little ball (minus the saguaro needles). On top of the awesome food, Ermanos is also unveiling their new Cerezo beer! 5-9 p.m.

Beer Week: Pueblo Vida. Releases are fun, especially if alcohol is involved. Pueblo Vida will have a can release of Andromeda IPA and Momentum Pale Ale. Why not end a week dedicated to the celebration of beer with not one, but two can releases? 4-10 p.m.

No Man’s Land Film Fest Presented by the Climbing Association of Southern Arizona, this series of films celebrates lady adventurers. Check out female athletes conquering terrain and obstacles for the first time in Tucson, and stay after for a discussion with local women making a difference. 7:30 p.m. $12. The Loft Cinema.

Champagne Dinner. If Valentine’s Day left you feeling empty, go ahead and fill yourself back up with a five-course meal at Westward Look Wyndham Grand Resort & Spa. Featuring every kind of fancy dish you could imagine: oysters, peach jam, lamb, goat cheese, lime lavender vinaigrette, and more. 245 E Ina Road. For reservations, call (520) 297-1151.

No One Told Me This Sh*t Was Going to be Hard! Well, ain’t that the truth about just about everything in life. In this case, though, it’s about the ups and downs, failures and successes, trials and tribulations of being an entrepreneur and starting your own company. Hear from a panel of experts at this interactive event, including representatives from InHouse, the real estate software company. 5:30 to 7 p.m. Connect Coworking–Downtown Tucson Office Space, 33 South Fifth Ave. $5.

Sonoran Seasons. This is easier to remember at this time of year, when we’re not all making frantic dashes from our air-conditioned houses to our air-conditioned cars, and burning out hands on our steering wheels, but Tucson actually has more than one season. In fact, it has five: winter, spring, fore-summer, summer monsoon and fall. Tohono Chul Park’s new gallery exhibit celebrates Tucson’s array of seasons, and of biological specimens. Featured artist Janet Windsor uses graphic design and stitching skills to create fiber artwork of desert seasons. Exhibit runs through Wednesday, April 18. Artist’s reception: 5:30 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 15 Curator’s Talk: 10 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 20 and Thursday, Feb. 22. Tohono Chul Park, 7366 Paseo del Norte. $13 adults, $10 students, seniors over 62 and military. $3 kids 5 to 12 and free for kids under 5.

The Best Brothers. Canadian playwright Daniel MacIvor brings us this tale of calamity, competitive siblings and canines. When a woman named Bunny Best loses her life at a Gay Pride Parade, her two sons are saddled with writing obituaries, giving eulogies and caring for their mother’s Italian greyhound, Enzo. In the midst of it all, their sibling rivalry comes to a head. It’s witty and lighthearted, and there’s a dog. What more could you ask for? Thursday, Feb. 15 to Saturday, March 24. 7:30 p.m. on Thursdays through Saturdays and 3 p.m. on Sundays. Live Theatre Workshop, 5317 E. Speedway Blvd. $15 Thursday nights and $18 to $20 Friday through Sunday.

Rob Schneider & David Spade: Joe Dirt and The Hot Chick are coming together for an absolutely unparalleled night of comedy. There’s no telling what these guys are gonna say, but just think about Schneider’s roles in Grown Ups, You Don’t Mess With The Zohan and The Animal, and Spade’s work in Dicke Roberts: Former Child Star, Tommy Boy and Benchwarmers (Schneider was in that one too), and you’ll get the idea. Buh-Bye. 8 p.m. (doors at 7 p.m.) Casino Del Sol Event Center, 45655 W. Valencia Road. Tickets start at $45. 21+.

Events compiled by Jeff Gardner, Emily Dieckman and Brianna Lewis.

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Hey! What Happened To the Arizona Monitor Website?

Posted By on Wed, Feb 14, 2018 at 3:30 PM

Pima County Supervisor Ally Miller sure knows how to pick her news sources. - COURTESY ARIZONA DAILY INDEPENDENT
  • Courtesy Arizona Daily Independent
  • Pima County Supervisor Ally Miller sure knows how to pick her news sources.
Politico had a fascinating story this morning about the Arizona Monitor, a "news" website that has recently been singing the praises of—among others—Republican Kelli Ward, the former state lawmaker now running for U.S. Senate, as well as Pima County's nuttiest supervisor, Ally Miller.
It looked as if Arizona Senate candidate Kelli Ward had scored a big endorsement: On Oct. 28, she posted a link on her campaign website and blasted out a Facebook post, quoting extensively from a column in the Arizona Monitor.

Ticking off the names of Ward’s competitors in the Republican primary to replace Sen. Jeff Flake, the Monitor declared: “They all, despite how much some of them profess their love and devotion to President Trump, didn’t have the stones to run against Jeff Flake and will have made the ‘brave’ decision to run for Senate only after Flake decided he wasn’t going to run … Kelli Ward is your woman.”

There was just one problem: Despite its reputable sounding name, the Arizona Monitor is not a real news site. It is an anonymous, pro-Ward blog that has referred to her primary opponent Martha McSally as “Shifty McSally,” frequently blasted Flake and, at the top of its home page, proclaims its mission as “Striking Fear into the Heart of the Establishment.” The site launched just a few weeks before publishing the endorsement, and its domain registration is hidden, masking the identity of its owner. On its Facebook page, it is classified as a news site, but scant other information is offered.

The Arizona Monitor seems to be part of a growing trend of conservative political-messaging sites with names that mimic those of mainstream news organizations and whose favored candidates then tout their stories and endorsements as if they were from independent journalists. It’s a phenomenon that spans the country from northern New England, where the anonymous Maine Examiner wreaked havoc on a recent mayoral election, all the way out to California, where Rep. Devin Nunes launched — as reported by POLITICO— his own so-called news outlet, the California Republican.

Hours after the Politico report, the Monitor went offline, which goes to show that cockroaches do scatter once the light hits them.

Miller, who is no stranger to weird blogs run by anonymous would-be journalists, shared links from the Monitor web site, as it and the Arizona Daily Independent were the two places that gave her sympathetic coverage (as most legit news organizations in town have realized that she's a compulsive liar with a thin grasp on reality). But Politico notes that Miller is denying knowing who is/was behind the Monitor. Maybe she can launch another FBI investigation into this one!

Trump's Education Budget Proposal

Posted By on Wed, Feb 14, 2018 at 2:28 PM

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Trump's budget proposal isn't just being called DOA—Dead On Arrival. It's being called DBIA—Dead Before It Arrived—since the congressional budget deal he signed means some of his proposals were outdated before they were printed.

But nothing Trump proposes, or says, or does, no matter how ridiculous or mendacious, can be considered dead so long as congressional Republicans buckle and bend the knee whenever it's time to show some independence. They're like a character in The Sopranos saying, "Sure I hang around with Tony Soprano sometimes, but I'm my own man. I know when to say no." Uh huh. Sure you do.

So let's look at Trump's DOA, or DBIA, proposals for the education budget, because everything that comes from his mouth or his tweets or his office matters, to the shame of his weak-kneed enablers.

Trump proposes to cut about 5 percent, or $3.6 billion, from education spending.

First, the education budget losers. Here are programs which would end.
• $2 billion for teaching training and class size reduction efforts. Gone.
• $1.2 billion for after-school programs. Gone.
• $400 million for districts to use for a variety of purposes including health-related programs and improving access to technology. Gone.
• $340 million to help get low-income and first-in-their-family students prepare for college. Gone.
• $250 million for states to develop preschool programs in low income areas. Gone.
• $190 million for grants supporting reading programs. Gone.
• $140 million for educational research programs. Gone.
• $73 million for pairing academic programs with health and related services. Gone.

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The Tip Off: Rawle Alkins leads Arizona into Tempe to play Tra Holder and Arizona State

Posted By on Wed, Feb 14, 2018 at 11:42 AM

Rawle Alkins is averaging 13.6 points per game and 4.1 rebounds per game for Arizona this season. - ARIZONA ATHLETICS
  • Arizona Athletics
  • Rawle Alkins is averaging 13.6 points per game and 4.1 rebounds per game for Arizona this season.
Welcome to the week where full of good, old-fashioned hate sweeps across our state like a wayward Haboob racing across the parched desert.

I'm talking, of course, about the biannual throw-down on the hard wood between our state's largest institutions of higher knowledge—The University of Arizona and Arizona State University.

The rivalry (which really hasn't been much of a contest over the years), has seen the Wildcats on the winning end in 15 of the last 20 matchups—including five straight since 2016.

The first clash between the two went the way of the Wildcats, with Sean Miller's squad narrowly escaping a home court defeat, 84-78, over the then-third ranked Sun Devils.

Arizona's victory in the Dec. 30 matchup stemmed largely from ASU's inability to hit the broadside of a barn offensively, shooting a dismal 37.9 percent from the field (and 32 percent from three-point territory) in the contest.

The Sun Devils' performance in that game looks even ghastlier when you remove do-it-all point guard Tra Holder from the equation. Holder, who has been one of the best scorers in the nation this season, pummeled the Wildcats' defense, to the tune of 31 points in the late December showdown.

Holder, who leads the Sun Devils offensively, with 19.3 points per game, has been red-hot in ASU's last five games, scoring 20 or more points in four of the five contests, with 22 points in each of the team's wins over USC and UCLA last week.

Miller admitting during his weekly press conference that the Wildcats' were lucky in their first contest, saying the game's final stats reflected ASU's inability to score, rather than his team playing excellent defense.

"That's a little deceiving because you have to realize how many three-point attempts
they're taking, right?" Miller said. "...So for us, you have to be careful. Free throw attempts, three attempts are big parts of ASU's attack and the consistent effort throughout, not just in the first half but both halves and being able to get great defense from our bench in a continued effort."

Rawle Alkins' return to normalcy

A big advantage for Arizona this go-around is the relative health of sophomore guard Rawle Alkins, who missed a large portion of the season with a foot injury.

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