Friday, October 27, 2017

Pixies Still Fly At Lost Lake

Posted By on Fri, Oct 27, 2017 at 3:00 PM

  • Jeff Gardner
When the crowd cheers at the intro of every song, you know the band is doing or did something right. In this case it’s both.

From blistering noise-rock to sweet and sentimental ballads, Pixies’ show at Lost Lake spanned their entire career. There was so much music for them to cover they rarely had time to speak between songs; in fact they didn’t at all. There wasn’t a single non-musical word spoken the entire show. This may have given a feeling of disconnection from the audience if it weren’t for the crowd singing along to every word.

This standoffishness does however, fit the lunacy of their music: they don’t take their songs too seriously, so why treat their concerts any different? Besides, when you’re a band that large and influential, and with so many classics in your repertoire, you don’t have time to talk, nor is talking necessary.

Not to say the songs were uninteresting or the same as they’ve always been: frontman Black Francis sang most songs with a different pacing and inflection than what listeners are used to on the albums. Not only did this make their classic hits sound fresh, but it caught the audience off guard and had them listening for the changes to come. If the audience was sitting down instead of thrashing about, they’d be on the edge of their seats.

So in the end, you’re left with a great band playing the hits, and an eager crowd of thousands singing along and not wanting it to be any other way.

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Run The Jewels Put Meaning Behind The Mania At Lost Lake

Posted By on Fri, Oct 27, 2017 at 8:00 AM

  • Jeff Gardner
Even the security guards volleyed beach balls when Run the Jewels took the stage. And they definitely did take the stage—by force. The hip-hop duo’s presence and energy was unsurpassed the entire festival weekend. That combined with eye-rattling bass and some of the catchiest hooks in modern rap made an explosive concoction rarely heard outside of the classic hip-hop of the 90s.

But it was more than rambunctiousness and fun, another similarity RTJ has with the 90s golden age is being hip-hop performers with a message, like Public Enemy and Nas. Throughout the night the duo (Killer Mike and El-P) discussed losing a loved one, following your dreams, and suicide prevention.

“If any of you ever lost anyone you care about,” El-P said. “Close your eyes during this next song and pretend they’re standing next to you.”

However this consciously-charged delivery wasn’t too much of a break from the norm for the rappers, considering just last year Killer Mike opened for Bernie Sanders’ presidential campaign.

A Run the Jewels live show can be rowdy inspiration to anyone: aspiring musicians, depressed youth, even middle-aged adults who’ve lost their groove will start rocking again when they see two rappers, both 42, dancing their asses off on stage.

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Carnival of Illusion: Magic, Mystery & Oooh La La!

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