Tuesday, August 2, 2016

McSally: "No Justification for Ever Attacking the Family of Someone Who Gave His or Her Life for This Country"

Posted By on Tue, Aug 2, 2016 at 9:00 AM

U.S. Rep. Martha McSally has weighed in on Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's ongoing feud with Khizr and Ghazala Khan Kahn, the parents of heroic Muslim-American soldier Capt. Humayun S. M. Khan killed in Iraq in 2004.

"Our fallen heroes, and their families, deserve nothing but our highest respect," McSally said via email. "This is not a gray area, and there is no justification ever for attacking the family of someone who gave his or her life for this country."

In case you've somehow missed out on this episode, Trump in recent days has suggested that Ghazala Kahn was forbidden to speak—because of some weird Islamic Sharia Law thing!—during her husband's lambasting of Trump at the Democratic National Convention; he's said the Kahns had "no right" to speak out against him; he's compared the Kahn's loss of their son in the Iraq war to his own "sacrifice" in creating jobs; and he's told a TV station that Kahn was "most upset" by the idea that Trump would prevent terrorists from entering the country. His surrogates has suggested that Trump has sacrificed his first two marriages in all his job-creating stress and the Khizr Kahn is a secret agent of the Muslim Brotherhood. Oh, and during a rally with GOP vice-presidential nominee Mike Pence, a crowd booed the mother of a soldier serving overseas because she asked Pence about the Kahn family and Trump's general disrespect toward the military

McSally has said she won't endorse Trump, but she may vote for him.

McSally's statement followed the path of House Speaker Paul Ryan and Mitch McConnell, who spoke out in support of the Kahns without actually criticizing Trump.

Sen. John McCain, who has not backed off his promised endorsement of Trump despite Trump's disparagement of his war record, did call out Trump by name in his statement:

The Republican Party I know and love is the party of Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Dwight D. Eisenhower, and Ronald Reagan.

I wear a bracelet bearing the name of a fallen hero, Matthew Stanley, which his mother, Lynn, gave me in 2007, at a town hall meeting in Wolfeboro, New Hampshire. His memory and the memory of our great leaders deserve better from me.

In recent days, Donald Trump disparaged a fallen soldier's parents. He has suggested that the likes of their son should not be allowed in the United States — to say nothing of entering its service. I cannot emphasize enough how deeply I disagree with Mr. Trump's statement. I hope Americans understand that the remarks do not represent the views of our Republican Party, its officers, or candidates.

Make no mistake: I do not valorize our military out of some unfamiliar instinct. I grew up in a military family, and have my own record of service, and have stayed closely engaged with our armed forces throughout my public career. In the American system, the military has value only inasmuch as it protects and defends the liberties of the people.

My father was a career naval officer, as was his father. For hundreds of years, every generation of McCains has served the United States in uniform.

My sons serve today, and I'm proud of them. My youngest served in the war that claimed Captain Khan's life as well as in Afghanistan. I want them to be proud of me. I want to do the right thing by them and their comrades.

Humayun Khan did exactly that — and he did it for all the right reasons. This accomplished young man was not driven to service as a United States Army officer because he was compelled to by any material need. He was inspired as a young man by his reading of Thomas Jefferson — and he wanted to give back to the country that had taken him and his parents in as immigrants when he was only two years old.

Captain Khan's death in Iraq, on June 8th, 2004, was a shining example of the valor and bravery inculcated into our military. When a suicide bomber accelerated his vehicle toward a facility with hundreds of American soldiers, Captain Khan ordered his subordinates away from the danger.
"Then he ran toward it.
"The suicide bomber, striking prematurely, claimed the life of Captain Khan — and Captain Khan, through his selfless action and sacrifice, saved the lives of hundreds of his brothers and sisters.

Scripture tells us that "Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends."

Captain Humayun Khan of the United States Army showed in his final moments that he was filled and motivated by this love. His name will live forever in American memory, as an example of true American greatness.

In the end, I am morally bound to speak only to the things that command my allegiance, and to which I have dedicated my life's work: the Republican Party, and more importantly, the United States of America. I will not refrain from doing my utmost by those lights simply because it may benefit others with whom I disagree.

I claim no moral superiority over Donald Trump. I have a long and well-known public and private record for which I will have to answer at the Final Judgment, and I repose my hope in the promise of mercy and the moderation of age. I challenge the nominee to set the example for what our country can and should represent.

Arizona is watching. It is time for Donald Trump to set the example for our country and the future of the Republican Party. While our Party has bestowed upon him the nomination, it is not accompanied by unfettered license to defame those who are the best among us.

Lastly, I'd like to say to Mr. and Mrs. Khan: thank you for immigrating to America. We're a better country because of you. And you are certainly right; your son was the best of America, and the memory of his sacrifice will make us a better nation — and he will never be forgotten.

Tags: , , , ,

Comments (32)

Showing 1-32 of 32

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-32 of 32

Add a comment

Previously in the Range

More by Jim Nintzel

  • Happy Birthday, Hotel Congress

    You don’t turn 100 every day, so a big congrats to Hotel Congress for hitting the century mark. Home to landmarks like Club Congress and the Cup Café, Congress has become a cultural centerpiece in Tucson. You never know who you’re likely to see when you pop in for breakfast: Is that a U.S. senator? An indie rock star? A renowned artist?
    • Nov 21, 2019
  • The Skinny

    No Surprises
    • Nov 14, 2019
  • Memory Lane

    It’s hard to believe it’s been five years since reporter and author Charles Bowden died at age 69. But even though Chuck—famous for his investigations into the drug trade along the border as well as his environmental writing—is no longer with us, his words are.
    • Nov 14, 2019
  • More »
Today | Fri | Sat | Sun | Mon | Tue | Wed
Meditation and Buddhist study

Meditation and Buddhist study @ Sky Island Zen

Mondays, Saturdays

All of today's events | Staff Picks

Staff Pick

TMA Holiday Art Market

The Holiday Art Market brings together more than 100 artisans selling handmade and one-of-a-kind items. Browse original… More

@ Tucson Museum of Art Fri., Nov. 22, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat., Nov. 23, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 24, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 140 N. Main Ave.

» More Picks

Submit an Event Listing

Popular Content

  1. Claytoon of the Day: Zelensky Loves It (The Range: The Tucson Weekly's Daily Dispatch)
  2. Claytoon of the Day: Hater Chicken Concedes (The Range: The Tucson Weekly's Daily Dispatch)
  3. Things to Do, Nov. 20 (The Range: The Tucson Weekly's Daily Dispatch)
  4. XOXO: Where to Rock, Wednesday, Nov. 20 (The Range: The Tucson Weekly's Daily Dispatch)
  5. Man Sentenced for 2016 Death of Ann Day (The Range: The Tucson Weekly's Daily Dispatch)

© 2019 Tucson Weekly | 7225 Mona Lisa Rd. Ste. 125, Tucson AZ 85741 | (520) 797-4384 | Powered by Foundation