Wednesday, August 19, 2015

Gene Glass, ASU Professor Emeritus in Education from ASU: "Why I Am No Longer a Measurement Specialist"

Posted By on Wed, Aug 19, 2015 at 9:30 AM

click to enlarge COURTESY OF PHOTOSPIN
  • Courtesy of PhotoSpin

Gene Glass, Emeritus Professor at ASU, Professor at University of Colorado Boulder and Fellow at the National Education Policy Center, wrote in a blog post Monday,
Recently I asked my dean to switch my affiliation from the measurement program to the policy program. I am no longer comfortable being associated with the discipline of educational measurement.
Glass has been involved in psychometric work and research since 1960, during a time when "psychometrics promised it could win . . . the wars on poverty and ignorance." It never quite realized that promise. Worse, it has become a tool used against public education.
Measurement has changed along with the nation. In the last three decades, the public has largely withdrawn its commitment to public education. The reasons are multiple: those who pay for public schools have less money, and those served by the public schools look less and less like those paying taxes.

The degrading of public education has involved impugning its effectiveness, cutting its budget, and busting its unions. Educational measurement has been the perfect tool for accomplishing all three: cheap and scientific looking.

International tests have purported to prove that America’s schools are inefficient or run by lazy incompetents. Paper-and-pencil tests seemingly show that kids in private schools – funded by parents – are smarter than kids in public schools. We’ll get to the top, so the story goes, if we test a teacher’s students in September and June and fire that teacher if the gains aren’t great enough.

There has been resistance, of course. Teachers and many parents understand that children’s development is far too complex to capture with an hour or two taking a standardized test. So resistance has been met with legislated mandates. The test company lobbyists convince politicians that grading teachers and schools is as easy as grading cuts of meat. A huge publishing company from the UK has spent $8 million in the past decade lobbying Congress. Politicians believe that testing must be the cornerstone of any education policy.

The results of this cronyism between corporations and politicians have been chaotic. Parents see the stress placed on their children and report them sick on test day. Educators, under pressure they see as illegitimate, break the rules imposed on them by governments. Many teachers put their best judgment and best lessons aside and drill children on how to score high on multiple-choice tests. And too many of the best teachers exit the profession.

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