Tuesday, August 23, 2011

Science Moves Downtown

Posted By on Tue, Aug 23, 2011 at 2:31 PM

Bakhuysen_Crater.jpg

The Range got a chance to mingle some of the UA College of Science’s upcoming talent at a reception at Etherton Gallery last night.

We hope to tell you more about the scientists—who are studying everything from how our memory works to the measurement of atoms—in the upcoming weeks, but we wanted to share a bit of news announced by College of Science Dean Joaquin Ruiz.

It appears the school will soon be opening a exhibition in the Rialto Building on Congress Street and Fifth Avenue. The space currently has a display of authentic replicas from King Tut’s tomb and has previously been home to Bodies: The Exhibition and artifacts from the Titanic.

Ruiz tells us he’s anticipating a long future in the Rialto Building. The first year will focus on the planetary sciences. Given all that the UA Lunar and Planetary Lab has done in outer space, there’s no shortage of material available, including those cool Mars photos that we keep posting here on The Range.

The downtown digs are not quite the science center that the UA tried to get off the ground as part of Rio Nuevo, but it’s a start—and another sign that downtown is, at long last, on the rebound.

Speaking of HiRISE, TW intern Allie Leach tracked down the above photo of the Bakhuysen Crater, located in Noachis Terra. The HiRISE Science Team tells us:

Large impact craters often have pits on their floors. Some of these (with raised rims) are later impacts, but some are thought to originate immediately after the crater forms when slurries of molten and broken rocks occupy the crater floor.

Bakhuysen Crater, located in Noachis Terra, is thought to be the largest crater that possesses (and has preserved) these pitted materials.

For more on HiRISE, click here.

Large impact craters often have pits on their floors. Some of these (with raised rims) are later impacts, but some are thought to originate immediately after the crater forms when slurries of molten and broken rocks occupy the crater floor.

Bakhuysen Crater, located in Noachis Terra, is thought to be the largest crater that possesses (and has preserved) these pitted materials.

For more on HiRISE, click here.

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