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Mapping the Border 

A discarded water bottle bears the image of Santo Nio de Atocha. A popular object of devotion among migrants, the santo pictures the boy Jesus dressed for travel.

Image credit: Jay Rochlin

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Uploaded: Oct 4, 2007 | Post Comments

Image Archives: Stories: Jay Rochlin

  • Gregoria Erazo gets help from the Community Food Bank's Michelle Kuhns.
  • Let it Grow
  • Gregoria Erazo gets help from the Community Food...
  • Jay Rochlin
  • Feb 7, 2008
  • Gregoria Erazo digs in the family garden with grandson Damion Pollock.
  • Let it Grow
  • Gregoria Erazo digs in the family garden with...
  • Jay Rochlin
  • Feb 7, 2008
  • Locally grown fruits are sold at the Food Bank's Value Foods store and at its farmers' market.
  • Let it Grow
  • Locally grown fruits are sold at the Food...
  • Jay Rochlin
  • Feb 7, 2008
  • G.L. Taylor (right) has been a Food Bank volunteer for seven years. The goal of the Food Bank's various gardening programs, like the farmers' market, is to show the importance of vegetables to people's diets.
  • Let it Grow
  • G.L. Taylor (right) has been a Food Bank...
  • Jay Rochlin
  • Feb 7, 2008
  • Amanda Morse: "We (give out seeds) year-round, subject to availability."
  • Let it Grow
  • Amanda Morse: "We (give out seeds) year-round, subject...
  • Jay Rochlin
  • Feb 7, 2008
  • Lilly Curry and Amanda Morse in Nuestra Tierra, the precursor to the Food Bank's first-in-the-nation farm.
  • Let it Grow
  • Lilly Curry and Amanda Morse in Nuestra Tierra,...
  • Jay Rochlin
  • Feb 7, 2008
  • The retired UA geosciences professor checks the trail against a computer map. He's modest about his efforts to map an estimated 5,000 miles of trails. "What I'm doing is a teeny, tiny Band-Aid," he says.
  • Mapping the Border
  • The retired UA geosciences professor checks the trail...
  • Jay Rochlin
  • Oct 4, 2007
  • McCullough enters his new data onto his computer when he gets home to Tucson. He'll print out maps of the trails and distribute them to activists trying to save desert crossers' lives. The migrant routes shift constantly in response to Border Patrol arrests. "It's Darwinism," says the retired scientist.
  • Mapping the Border
  • McCullough enters his new data onto his computer...
  • Jay Rochlin
  • Oct 4, 2007
  • McCullough plots "waypoints" on his GPS unit every 300 feet along the trail. During his geology days at the university, he used a compass in the field, but the sensitive new GPS beats the old equipment hands down, he says.
  • Mapping the Border
  • McCullough plots "waypoints" on his GPS unit every...
  • Jay Rochlin
  • Oct 4, 2007

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