Narrow Search

  • Show Only

  • Category

  • Narrow by Date

    • All
    • Today
    • Last 7 Days
    • Last 30 Days
    • Select a Date Range

Comment Archives: stories: Music

Re: “What's a Folk Song?

I am a huge admirer of Michael Cooney's talent, but I have to disagree with him about folk music. Just because "you know who wrote it" does not automatically disqualify it from being a folk song. There is indeed a folk process, but it has impacted even songs actually written by people we know of. He uses "Wimoweh" as an example: written b y Solomon Linda, adapted by Pete Seeger, further adjusted by the Tokens, it is absolutely a folk song. The narrow definition Mr. Cooney ascribes to is both dangerous and frankly an insult to the folk process. So many of us learned folk songs around a campfire that we later learned were written by Stephen Foster, for example. Does that make them any less folk songs. There are thousands upon thousands of kids who learned "Puff the Magic Dragon" when their parents sang it to them at bathtime or bedtime" the folk process at work. When they later heard PP&M do it, did it automatically lose its "folkness"? I fully admit that I have a pretty broad definition of folk music, in part because I have an inherent distrust of "genres" (mostly artificial constructs designed to reinforce individual musical tastes/prejudices), and in part because I think that almost all music has its roots in the folk tradition. I know that people often smile when they hear Big Bill Broonzy's statement (sometimes attributed to Louis Armstrong) that "All music is folk music, because I ain't never heard a horse sing a song," and then refuse to take it too seriously. But the crux of my personal definition of folk music lies in that statement, however oversimplimfied it might be. I am NOT one of those hardcore purists who believe that only old, traditional (authors unknown) songs played on traditional instruments is folk music. The google dictionary defines folk music as "music that originates in traditional popular culture or that is written in such a style. Folk music is typically of unknown authorship and is transmitted orally from generation to generation." That is silly, self-contradictory, and unhealthily limiting. "Transmitted orally" implies that more modern transmissions (i.e. recordings) are invalid, and its insistence on "typically of unknown authorship" directly contradicts the earlier claim of "written in such a style", as the authorship of songs in that category is generally known. Indeed, all songs at some point were created by someone. The "folk process" is far more intricate and complex than that simple definition indicates. The National Endowment for the Arts provides the following definition of “folk and traditional arts -- rooted in and reflective of the cultural life of a community. Community members may share a common ethnic heritage, cultural mores, language, religion, occupation, or geographic region. These vital and constantly reinvigorated artistic traditions are shaped by values and standards of excellence that are passed from generation to generation, most often within family and community, through demonstration, conversation, and practice.” This is a pretty good place to start. Read it carefully. Despite what some folks assert, it paints with a pretty broad brush. Blues and Rap music would fit easily into this definition. It fails, however, to take into account the rich vein of protest music that has been around for at least two centuries and has often been considered-- even by the purists-- to be part of folk music. Is Woody Guthrie's music folk music? Of course it is. For the most part, like Joe Hill, he took old traditional tunes and put new words to them: something that has been going on for many hundreds of years. Because we can name who did it, does that make it any less folk? When Franz Schubert or Ralph Vaughan-Williams took old German or English folk songs and turned them into classical pieces, did they lose their folk identity? I would argue not. In fact, almost any music can be considered folk if one is willing to take the time to examine and discuss its roots and influences. And we MUST differentiate between defining folk music and articulating our individual tastes in music. There are some artists I do not like to listen to, but that does not make them any less folk. I have a weakness for harmony and for shorter instrumental introductions (unless the piece is an instrumental), but that doesn't mean that I believe folk music to be limited to the songs I like. If it makes someone more comfortable to break music down into categories like "traditional folk", "urban folk", "contemporary folk", "topical (or protest) folk", "folk rock", "folk punk", etc. so be it. But it's mostly all folk to me.

Posted by Nick Noble on 12/15/2014 at 12:38 PM

Re: “Love is the Only Truth

Thank you for the opportunity. Honored to be in the Tucson Weekly.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Ezra Letra on 12/11/2014 at 9:29 AM

Re: “Love is the Only Truth

Nice spotlight on a great artist!

2 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Isaac Kirkman on 12/11/2014 at 8:59 AM

Re: “Music Counts

It's sad that their tragic story is what finally made me actually listen to their music.

Posted by Gonzo Sorcrachi on 12/06/2014 at 10:42 PM

Re: “Memories and Meaning

one of my favorites! so excited for the new record!

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by tucsonjohn on 11/26/2014 at 5:22 PM

Re: “Primer

So there's no one in the band named Marshall Tucker? Never knew that.

Posted by Schmackie on 11/08/2014 at 1:30 PM

Re: “It Was Phil Spector and Carole King, In The Studio, With The Microphone: The Implications Of The Crystals' "He Hit Me (It Felt Like A Kiss)"

The Crystals also recorded the equally bizarre "(Let's Dance) The Screw," a not-so subtle flip-off to his former business partner. As you said, they are pieces of music whose nature and origins should repulse us, but instead they invite our attention, like the remains of a train wreck. I had heard it said that Carole King regrets having anything to do with this song, but I am greatly interested to know the song and the authors' histories and reflections in the song.

Posted by Charles J. Cizek on 11/06/2014 at 7:55 PM

Re: “Got the Tape Spinnin' in the Echoplex

Who knows what the future holds! ;-)

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Burger Records on 11/06/2014 at 3:15 PM

Re: “Base Level Fun

Here's more information on the Fest!

Saturday 8 November
4pm - midnight
$12 for over 12 bands!
(a portion of all ticket and bar sales will go to the All Souls Procession)

Band times will be released soon, keep up to date here -- https://www.facebook.com/events/2964045372…

Posted by catstronaut. on 10/31/2014 at 1:16 AM

Re: “Soundbites

I feel Dan's pain! As a huge fan of alt-country, Americana, and all it's various sub-sub genres the Mumford and Son's, Lumineers wave has been a trainwreck. Still, O' Death is badass! Been rocking out to them for years now! Thanks for covering this show.

Posted by Bryan Parker on 10/30/2014 at 7:33 AM

Re: “Brass Tax, I Am The Albatross, Hibris; Sky Bar, Saturday, Oct. 18

BRASS TAX!!!

Posted by Psygoat on 10/23/2014 at 11:35 AM

Re: “Primer

They suck, what else is there to say?

Posted by Louis Cypher on 10/23/2014 at 1:21 AM

Re: “Metal Mania

I missed the show but will try to make it next year. I just stumbled upon your blog. I'm learning how to sing from http://thomascollettvocal.com/singing-samples/ Maybe sometime you guys will be reviewing me! Hope so.

Posted by Marc Cuva on 10/22/2014 at 2:13 PM

Re: “Soundbites

WOO! can't wait to check out show tonight !!

Posted by Mel Melo Dominguez on 10/15/2014 at 4:04 PM

Re: “Chuck Berry's Thoughts on Punk and New Wave in 1980

Believe it or not, chuck played on the UA mall near Mckale in, I believe, August of1980. It may have been '81

Posted by Tim d on 10/11/2014 at 7:16 AM

Re: “Black One: "Rosemont"

Experience the enitre Rosemont Project at http://www.rosemontblvd.com/

Posted by Jaron Ikner on 10/09/2014 at 7:39 AM

Re: “Hard Lessons

It's a pretty rare thing to hear songs forged so expertly in the fires of experience. The material has had a good long while to marinate, and Gabe and the boys put a lot of umph behind the live renderings of these works. Really, really great stuff.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Tres Ikner on 10/07/2014 at 2:31 PM

Re: “Hard Lessons

Billy Sedlmayr is my hero, hands-down. This man went to the bottom and came climbing back up, brilliantly. That is raw character and courage.

2 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by MK on 10/03/2014 at 7:32 PM

Re: “Soundbites

Yeah, unfortunately the show was for us a drag also. We work for a living so having to wait around an hour longer after the first two bands were done and then the Cat Power sound check was a bit exhausting. And the focus on stage once they came out kind of reminded me of the last B.B. King concert i attended . But shelling out $32 bucks for the Rialto is kind of ridiculous anyways given the terrible acoustics. Seems it was only two or three years ago shows were 10-12 bucks. $16 for something special. And that $1 extra for the Rialto renovation fund, wheres that going? Haven't they paid for the new signage already?

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by realista1 on 10/03/2014 at 11:35 AM

Re: “Nine Questions

Thanks to these Nine Questions, by Mari Herreras and answers by Ernesto Portillo, Jr, I can explore a variety of music I did not know about and I will certainly avoid "Techno-banda!"

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Maricela Teran Martinez-Whitmore on 10/02/2014 at 11:40 AM

© 2014 Tucson Weekly | 3725 Mona Lisa Rd. Ste. 125, Tucson AZ 85741 | (520) 797-4384 | Powered by Foundation