Thursday, March 23, 2017

Two New(ish) Businesses to Visit During the Street Fair

Posted By on Thu, Mar 23, 2017 at 7:30 PM

The 47th Annual Street Fair is expected to attract more than 300,000 visitors this weekend. - HAILEY FREEMAN
  • Hailey Freeman
  • The 47th Annual Street Fair is expected to attract more than 300,000 visitors this weekend.


Isabella's Ice Cream (210 N. Fourth Ave.)

UA alumni Dominic and Kristel Johnson created Isabella’s in 2010, and opened their location on Fourth Avenue this past November.



“I love how many people walk in and discover it,” Kristel says of Isabella’s. “We’ve been here a few months so everyone is starting to figure out where the shop is now.”


Kristel has nothing but rave reviews for the area. It was her idea, after all, to move Isabella’s manufacturing to Fourth. 


“It’s been wonderful,” Kristel says of the neighborhood. “We love the location and the people are super friendly.”


Kristel prepares the treats in the back of the shop and tries to locally source all of her ingredients. Isabella’s uses cream and milk only from Arizona.


“Everything is fresh, natural, and pure,” Kristel says.


In addition to their ice creams and vegan sorbets, Isabella’s offers ice cream tacos, milkshakes, sundaes, popsicles and Belgian chocolate bonbons. If you’re the indecisive or overindulgent type, it is highly recommended that you try one of each. This selection will be available in-store the entire weekend.


And another menu item that’s sure to be a hit among Street Fairgoers? The ever-so-scrumptious fro-nut. Since its recent introduction, this doughnut ice cream sandwich has become a customer favorite. The Johnsons will be serving fro-nuts and cookie ice cream sandwiches from their vintage ice cream truck this weekend.


Mabel’s on 4th (419 N. Fourth Ave.)

After you’ve gotten your ice cream fix, come visit Mabel’s on 4th. This kitchen boutique opened in November 2016 and sells decor, gadgets and textiles to “make your kitchen smile.”


“We don’t have any serious kitchen stuff like pots and pans and cutlery,” owner Nicole Carrillo says. “We only carry fun stuff.”


The pair relocated from Savannah, Georgia where Nicole’s husband, Johnny, served in the Marine Corps. Nicole believes Tucson, specifically the Fourth Avenue area, is a “perfect fit” for Mabel’s and appreciates the friendliness of her customers.


“Everybody is so welcoming and kind,” Nicole says. “We decided the day we visited that we were going to move here.”


Johnny designs all of the LOL tea towels, including textiles supporting each branch of the military. Mabel’s will be offering 20 new towel patterns at Mabel’s booth this weekend only.


“Our booth will be nothing but all these fun tea towels,” Nicole says. “You’re sure to find something for everyone.”


Nicole says Mabel’s products appeal to all kinds of people, from grandparents to drinking friends.


A great gift for the latter group? A beer bottle or wine glass-shaped cookie cutter. Other quirky cookie cutter options include a bikini top, baseball glove and hippo.




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We Look Smaller in Boston

Posted By on Thu, Mar 23, 2017 at 7:00 PM

COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA.COM
  • Courtesy of wikimedia.com
Students attending a Boston public school have another world map, the Peters projection map, next to the one most of us are used to looking at.
Boston’s public schools began phasing in the lesser-known Peters projection, which cuts the US, Britain and the rest of Europe down to size. Teachers put contrasting maps of the world side by side and let the students study them.
If you haven't seen it before, take a look at the Peters projection map at the top of the post. The U.S. and Europe are pretty much the same size as they are on the Mercator map we're used to seeing, but some of the other land masses get a whole lot bigger. South America is now twice as large as Europe instead of the same size, and Africa is far larger as well. The map has a more accurate north-south arrangement, with the U.S. and Europe farther to the north instead of occupying the middle area. (Fun fact: in the standard Mercator map, Germany is pretty much dead center, except in the maps where the U.S. is moved to the central spot.)

History is written by the winners, and they get to draw the maps as well, putting themselves in the center of the world and shrinking everyone else down to size. The Peters projection map is a more proportional, less Eurocentric approximation of what the spherical world should look like when it's flattened out on piece of paper. Boston public schools are doing a little something to put the world back into its proper balance.
In an age of “fake news” and “alternative facts”, city authorities are confident their new map offers something closer to the geographical truth than that of traditional school maps, and hope it can serve an example to schools across the nation and even the world.
A map with the Mercator proportions and orientation, the one we're used to, is below.

Continue reading »

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Streets of This Town: Faces of Tucson

Posted By on Thu, Mar 23, 2017 at 6:25 PM

Himmel Park exasperation. - BRIAN SMTIH
  • Brian Smtih
  • Himmel Park exasperation.

"Streets of This Town" is a little daily photo series featuring random pics I take on long walks through Tucson—to sort of coincide with Tucson Salvage.

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The Weekly List: 16 Things To Do In Tucson In The Next 10 Days

Posted By on Thu, Mar 23, 2017 at 2:45 PM

Your Weekly guide to keeping busy in the Old Pueblo.

Cinema


The Brain. Sure, watching television is probably "bad" for couch potatoes who have been known to binge an entire Netflix series in one weekend (Hello, Santa Clarita Diet)—but at least the risk is limited to bad eyesight and antisocial tendencies instead of, say, mind control. It's mind over matter in The Brain, an ’80s film about a mad scientist/television host and a giant space brain teaming up to take over the great white north through the airwaves. Don't miss out: This is the last of the BAD BRAINS movies this month at the Loft. 8 p.m. Monday, March 27. Loft Cinema, 3233 E. Speedway Blvd. $3.

But I'm A Cheerleader. Natasha Lyonne is probably best known for her role as Nicky Nichols on Orange is the New Black, where she plays a heroin-addicted inmate known for her wild hair, mischievous smile and lady killer charms. OITNB won't have a new season out until June, but you get your lesbian cinema fix when the Loft screens But I'm a Cheerleader. The film stars (you guessed it!) Natasha Lyone as a young woman named Megan whose parents ship her off to a gay-to-straight conversion camp hoping she'll be able to focus on back handsprings instead of boobs during cheerleading practice. We don't want to spoil anything, but those camps never work. Michelle Williams, RuPaul (out of drag) and the guy who played Rufio also show up in this cinematic delight. 7:30 p.m. Sunday, March 26. Loft Cinema, 3233 E. Speedway Blvd. $6.

Forbidden Planet. Space nerds, this is the movie event for you. Participate in National Evening of Science on Screen with Astronomer/longtime UA professor Chris Impey is coming to the Loft Cinema to discuss all things space travel and developing human colonies on other planets—fittingly tied in with a viewing of the 1956 classic sci-fi flick Forbidden Planet, where the crew of the starship C-57D have to uncover the mysteries of Dr. Morbius and the alien Krell. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 28. Loft Cinema, 3233 E. Speedway Blvd. $9.50.

Movie Poster Sale. Take a second and look around at your walls. A little blank, eh? Surround yourself with scenes from your favorite flicks by purchasing movie posters from the Loft Cinema. Here's what the theater is promising at their poster sale which takes place the last Saturday of every month: Current posters of films that have ended their run during the month; miscellaneous Film posters of films the Loft did not show; and more than 100 posters (at least 50 titles) from their current poster inventory.At the end of the sale, the remaining posters will be donated to a local arts program. 8-11 a.m. Saturday, March 25. Loft Cinema, 3233 E. Speedway Blvd. $5 per poster.

Dr. Strange at the Drive-In. We’ve been around this town long enough to remember those high-school days of squeezing into the trunk to sneak into the much-missed De Anza Drive-In—and we sure wish this cowtown still had a drive-in that was regularly open. There is a group of drive-in fans trying to make that happen with the nonprofit Cactus Drive-In Theatre Foundation, but while the hunt is on for a permanent home for those massive screens, the group is hosting the occasional drive-in flick at the Tanque Verde Swap Meet. This weekend, the group is screening Marvel’s most recent blockbuster, Dr. Strange. Catch a little movie magic at 7 p.m. Sunday, March 26, in the swap meet’s north parking lot, 4100 S Palo Verde Road. Organizers advise that you should only enter the north lot to get to the flick. Also, they’ll be directing larger vehicles and hatchbacks to park in the back or on the far right and far left side so as to not screw up the view for everyone else, so try to show a bit of courtesy if you’re behind the wheel of one of those. The suggested donation is $15 per vehicle.

Fun in General

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Con-Nichiwa. If you’re a fan of Dragonball Z, Himura Kenshin or Yagami Light, you’ll want to get to the Con-Nichiwa this weekend. The American anime convention returns to Tucson on Friday, March 25 through Sunday, March 27 at the Tucson Convention Center. It’s three days of anime fun with actors, animators and even performers such as Chii Sakurabi, a J-POP singer and recording artist from Tokyo, Japan known for her high-energy music, angelic voice, and kawaii style. And there will be plenty of lessons on how to get your cosplay right. Full weekend membership is $45.

Odyssey Storytelling. The past 13 years, Odyssey Storytelling has created community through monthly live storytelling events. Founder Penelope Starr celebrates the release of her book The Radical Act of Community Storytelling: Empowering Voices in Uncensored Events during a fundraiser emceed by David Fitzsimmons from 5 to 8 p.m. on Friday, March 24. YWCA Southern Arizona, 525 N. Bonita Ave. $10 suggested donation.

Succulent Bowls with Mimosas. All the best gardening clubs involve a little bit of drinking. Green Things got that memo and thought, “If we offer mimosas, they will come.” Get that drink in your hand and learn how to construct a beautiful little desert haven at this Saturday morning gardening class. The $5 class fee includes your drink, but no other supplies. Planets and pots will be available for purchase, but you can also bring supplies of your own. Don’t forget to RSVP on Facebook so they bring enough booze. 10 a.m. to noon. Saturday, March 25. Green Things, 3384 E. River Road.

The Office Trivia Night: That’s What She Said Edition. Have you ever gotten a new job, only to find yourself completely identifying with the poor, unfortunate souls in The Office? Binge watch the whole show to experience some catharsis, then put your “research” to good use by dominating at trivia night. Teams can have one to six people, and you should probably pick your team based on which of your friends squeal with delight when you yell, “Dwight, you ignorant slut!” in their direction. 7-10 p.m. Tuesday, March 28. Casa Video Film Bar, 2905 E. Speedway Blvd.

Animal Love

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Diamonds in the Ruff. You know the internal struggle: You want to buy a new rug, but there are so many homeless animals in the world! However should you distribute your paycheck? Worry not, dear animal/décor lover. You can contribute to the Humane Society of Southern Arizona while bidding on your favorite hand-woven rugs from around the world, with 10 percent of each purchase donated to HSSA. There will be hors d’oeuvres, cocktails and live jazz. Doors open at 2 p.m. and the auction starts at 4 p.m. Saturday, March 25. On Sunday, March 26, doors open at noon and the auction starts at 2 p.m. Karomo Rugs, 3630 E. Fort Lowell Road.

Trail Dog Day. Want to adopt a dog? Want to find about local businesses who can do cool things for your dogs? This Sunday marks the third annual Trail Dog Day at Trail Dust Town. There will be booze and there will be adoptable dogs—sounds like an ideal Sunday afternoon. 10 a.m. Sunday, March 26. Trail Dust Town, 6541 E. Tanque Verde Road.

Books


Tucson Weekly Arts and Entertainment Editor Brian Smith is celebrating the publication of his book of short stories, Spent Saints, with a pair of readings this weekend. Smith will be at the Owl's Club, 236 S. Scott Ave., from 7:30 to 10 p.m. on Saturday, March 25. On hand to entertain the crowd alongside Smith will be fellow authors Isaac Kirkman, Billy Sedlmayr. and John Freeman, as well as some violin from Brian's brother, Barry Smith, and piano from Nick Letson. You'll also have a chance to see 11 short films by various directors inspired by Smith's stories. Then on Sunday, March 26, Smith will read from the book at 2 p.m.  at Bookmans Entertainment Exchange, 6230 E. Speedway. Get a taste of the book that author Laurie Notaro has praised as as a collection that "reaches down to the bottom rung and pulls up despair as it melts into unlikely beauty, brings the reader dangerously close to unfolding, ominous dread and unveils the side of life that is dark, wanting and formidable."

Community

American Friends Service Committee-AZ Centennial. This group takes on Arizona crazyland, challenging the state’s private prison love affair and taking on mass incarceration and immigrant detention. Help them celebrate their 100th birthday on from 5 to 10 p.m. Tuesday, March 30, at La Cocina, 201 N. Court Ave. Tucson desert rock icon Billy Sedlmayr will perform alongside poetry readings from the North Star Collective. There’s also a silent auction to raise funds for the program’s ongoing work. La Cocina will donate 10 percent of all sales this night. afscarizona.org

Music

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KFMA Day. Powerhouse local alt-radio station KFMA trips the day electric with the fattest punk-metal-pop flourishes on earth. You’ll hear unyielding fist-jacking choruses, youthful balls-to-walls guitars, as well as heavyweight vets like Blink 182 (who, make no mistake, to this day, turn pop-punk force into precision-tuned rock ’n’ roll) and A Day to Remember. Sharing this killer bill is one of our current faves here at TW HQ, Goodbye June. This suitably hirsute combo hails from the great American south and sounds in tradition with that, and boy can they write good songs with hammering riffs, the likes of which hasn’t really been heard since Buckcherry was good. So slam Monster-in-a-can until your heart-rate levels out at a good 120 BPM and dig some of the other bands too, like the heavy-menacing money riffs of Islander and the super-melodic metalist pop of Highly Suspect. What a fun, glorious day of briny push-tits and ear-ringing, shout-out madness. Sunday, March 26 at Kino Veterans Memorial Stadium, 2500 E Ajo Way. $40. Doors at noon. All ages.

Lukie D. From the moment the strident horns sound and the hyper recording pops its 2/4 groove, the music is obviously authentically Jamaican. Although at its worst, Lukie D sounds cheesy and his emotional range often appears more limited than his vocals, there’s something guttural and compelling about his pristine croons. His tracks may sound more at home on the Cool Runnings soundtrack than the Harder They Come, yet there’s so much damn sweetness below the sheen. It makes us want to give in to his catalog of love songs just a little bit. Unlike other reggae-lite acts like Maroon 5 or even UB40, Lukie D grew up in the third world and his music betrays some resulting depth in spite of itself. His too-perfect covers have an undercurrent of poverty and its resultant longing for a better life that makes Lukie D a sympathetic and relatable character. God, and his AC/DC cover! Saturday, March 25, Grand Luxe Hotel Event Center (Africa Night Dance Fusion), 1365 West Grant. 9 p.m. $25. All ages.

Ozomatli with Squirrel Nut Zippers. Anyone who's been to an Ozomatli show knows it's nigh impossible not to dance. We’ve seen totally wiped EDM kids summon up their last legs to skank, old-school vatos start the set by nodding their heads only to end up passing their cane to a homie and ducking in and out of the pit. Frat boys drop their solo cups to raise the roof and get down and there's always that universal thought bubble after the first few songs—“So this is what Sublime was getting at.” One of the only acts that can energetically hold a candle to Ozomatli live is the Squirrel Nut Zippers, with their frenetic jump-jive dancehall, one part homage, one part parody. And now thanks to Trump, two of the loudest, proudest Latin American and so-called “Americana” outfits have teamed up for six shows. There's no way this won't be smokin' caliente and chido al misma vez. Tuesday, March 28, Rialto, $35, 6:30 p.m., all ages.

Dieselboy. The Philly-raised Dieselboy (Damian Higgins) is the godhead drum and bass DJ (and now a respected chef!) who made his name back in the 1990s as a gifted jungle DJ. His longevity in a world where DJ careers are usually gone with a change of seasons is remarkable; no doubt due to his crafty, chest-caving productions, and savvy ear for beats, hooks, moods and, yes, trends. He smartly released his recordings on his own badass Human Imprint, and proceeded to enjoy dubstep and electro hits. His videogame work has won over countless sets of ears. Dude’s a master at fusing the urban with the urbane, and take heads off in the process. His new “Angel Dust” kills. This is a super-rare Tucson performance at a killer downtown space. Saturday, March 25, at Solar Culture Gallery and Performance Space, 31 E. Toole. 10 p.m. $15.



Huge Congrats to Tucson Writer Francisco Cantú For Snagging a Prestigious Whiting Award for His Forthcoming Memoir!

Posted By on Thu, Mar 23, 2017 at 1:51 PM

Writer Francisco Cantú.
  • Writer Francisco Cantú.
Tucson writer Francisco Cantú snagged this week a prestigious 2017 Whiting Award, which includes, beyond the international attention, $50,000. He'll be honored along with nine other recipients in New York City, a ceremony keynoted by Pulitzer Prize winner Siddhartha Mukherjee. Note that past Whiting winners impressively include David Foster Wallace, Jeffrey Eugenides, Denis Johnson, Ocean Vuong, and Deborah Eisenberg. The Whiting Awards was "established by the Whiting Foundation in 1985, remain one of the most esteemed and largest monetary gifts ($50,000) to emerging writers, and are based on the criteria of early-career achievement and the promise of superior literary work to come."

Cantú, who worked for the United States Border Patrol as an agent form 2008-2012 is a former Fulbright fellow who earned an MFA in nonfiction from the UA. Locally, his work has often appeared in Edible Baja Arizona. His bio says he's a frequent contributor to Guernica and a contributing editor at PublicBooks.org, where he curates the “El Mirador” series, which collects original nonfiction, translation, and visual art focused on the American west, the borderlands, and Indian country. His writing has appeared, or is forthcoming, in South Loop Review, J Journal: New Writing on Justice, Ploughshares, and Orion.

Cantú's much-deserved award is for his forthcoming memoir, The Line Becomes a River (Riverhead Books), out 2018. We down here at TW HQ believe this award is a harbinger of things to come for Cantú. We've read excerpts from The Line Becomes and they are lovely and potent. You can read an excerpt here in the Paris Review.


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But I'm a Cheerleader is Screening at the Loft This Weekend

Posted By on Thu, Mar 23, 2017 at 10:44 AM

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Natasha Lyonne is probably best known for her role as Nicky Nichols on Orange is the New Black, where she plays a heroin-addicted inmate known for her wild hair, mischievous smile and lady killer charms—be still, my heart.

OITNB won't have a new season out until June, but you get your lesbian cinema fix when the Loft Cinema (3233 E. Speedway Blvd) screens But I'm a Cheerleader this Sunday, March 26 at 7:30 p.m.

The film stars (you guessed it!) Natasha Lyone as a young woman named Megan whose parents ship her off to a gay-to-straight conversion camp hoping she'll be able to focus on back handsprings instead of boobs during cheerleading practice. Good luck with that.

Michelle Williams, RuPaul (out of drag) and Rufio also show up in this cinematic delight.

It's worth more than worth the $6 ticket—so, maybe you should sign up for a Loft Membership? As March nears its end, so does the Loft's annual membership drive.

Here's what you get if you sign up—during March the number of free tickets are doubled, as reflected below:
4 FREE TICKETS* ANNUALLY FOR INDIVIDUALS, STUDENTS & TEACHERS

8 FREE TICKETS* ANNUALLY FOR COUPLES & ABOVE

MONTHLY FREE SCREENINGS OF GREAT NEW FILMS

FREE ORGANIC POPCORN AT EVERY FILM

FREE LOFT CINEMA STICKER

MEMBER PRICE OF $5.75 FOR ALL REGULARLY SCHEDULED FILMS

DISCOUNTED ADMISSION TO SPECIAL EVENTS

DISCOUNTED ADMISSION TO THE LOFT FILM FEST

EXCLUSIVE OPPORTUNITIES TO BUY ADVANCE TICKETS

WEEKLY EMAIL UPDATES & MONTHLY FILM GUIDE

*Some restrictions apply

Cinema Clips: Kong: Skull Island

Posted By on Thu, Mar 23, 2017 at 9:00 AM


The King Kong cinematic machine gets cranking again with Kong: Skull Island, an entertaining enough new take on the big ape that delivers the gorilla action but lags a bit when he isn’t on screen smashing things.

Among Kong incarnations, this one has the most in common with the 1976 take on the classic story, basically because it’s set just a few years earlier in ’73. While there is a beautiful girl the big guy does get a small crush on (Brie Larson as a photographer), the story eschews the usual “beauty and the beast” Kong angle for more straight-up monster vs. monster action.

Unlike the past American Kong films, this one never makes it overseas to Manhattan, opting to stay on Kong’s island—thus, the title of the film. Kong himself is portrayed by motion-capture CGI, and he’s a badass. He’s also tall enough to be a formidable foe for Godzilla, a mash-up already announced for 2020. In the few scenes where he interacts with humans, Kong plays like an organic creature rather than a bunch of gigabytes. He blends well with his human counterparts.

That’s right, there hasn’t been much mention of those human counterparts yet. That’s because, with the exception of John C. Reilly as a fighter pilot stranded on the island during World War II, most of the humans are bland. Tom Hiddleston might make a decent James Bond someday, and he’s a lot of fun as Loki, but he just doesn’t play here as a rugged tracker/action hero. Reilly, on the other hand, gives the film the bursts of humor it needs. His castaway is a wild card, like Dennis Hopper in Apocalypse Now.

Actually, the whole movie, with its post-Vietnam setup and Nixon-era themes, plays like Apocalypse Now meets King Kong. When Reilly is on screen, it plays like Apocalypse Now meets King Kong meets Talladega Nights.


Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Last Blast of Irish Music Thursday Night at St. Francis in the Foothills

Posted By on Wed, Mar 22, 2017 at 4:29 PM

Fiddler Athena Tergis joins renowned Irish musician Mick Moloney at a concert at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, at St. Francis in the Foothills Church. - COURTESY
  • Courtesy
  • Fiddler Athena Tergis joins renowned Irish musician Mick Moloney at a concert at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, at St. Francis in the Foothills Church.

Mick Moloney is a singer of songs, a teller of tales, a player of tenor banjo and guitar, and a scholarly folklorist who can tell you the meaning and origin of every note and word he sings. And he’s funny and charming to boot.

That rare commodity, a folk musician with a Ph.D., Professor Moloney has taught Irish Studies at New York University for years. He can tell you how immigrants coming to America changed the Irish music they brought with them. A recent CD, If It Wasn’t for the Irish and the Jews, “celebrates the joyous and creative era in American popular song from the early 1890's to the end of vaudeville and the start of the Great Depression.” Every song on the album is a collaboration between Irish and Jewish musicians who were immigrants or the children of immigrants.

A Limerick man, Moloney performs and records widely. He’s worked with PBS on the TV documentaries Out of Ireland and The Irish in America: Long Journey Home. His book Far From the Shamrock Shore: The Story of Irish American History Through Song has an accompanying CD.

For the Tucson concert, the last blast of Tucson’s Irish Season, Moloney teems up with Athena Tergis, an American-born prodigy who began playing the fiddle at age 4. She’s a master of Irish fiddling styles from the Auld Sod as well as from the Irish diaspora in North America. She’s performed on Broadway in Riverdance, plays regularly with Moloney in the band Green Fields of America, and she even toured the world with the late Clarence Clemons, sax player with the E Street Band.

The show starts at 7:30 Thursday, March 23, at St. Francis in the Foothills, 4625 E. River Road, at Swan. The church’s music hall has only 200 seats. Advance tickets are $20, $18 for seniors and member of TFTM, $3 more at the door. You can get them at www.inconcerttucson.com and at Antigone Books, 411 N. Fourth Ave., and The Folk hop, 2525 N. Campbell. For disability seats, call 981-1475. You can listen in to a sampling of songs here.

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