Monday, November 26, 2012

City Councilwoman Regina Romero Has Opinions on Education, Particularly TUSD's Deseg Plan

Posted By on Mon, Nov 26, 2012 at 5:54 PM

If you've got feelings about Tucson Unified School District's deseg plan, known as the Unitary Status Plan, know that you're not alone: Ward 1 City Councilwoman Regina Romero has all sorts of feelings about them, which she made clear in a release sent out this evening, and she urges you to take your feelings and opinions to the forums being held this week by TUSD. We've got the full letter for you after the jump, but here's a short-form of her views, point by point:

School Closures:
- Romero seems to oppose the closures of Manzo Elementary, Menlo Park Elementary and Brichta Elementary, noting that they would consolidate schools with "exceptionally high Latino populations" into Tully Elementary, "further exacerbating district segregation."
- Romero says that any potential closures must take into account the fact that "nearly 85% of students in Wards 1 & 5 are eligible for free and reduced lunch," noting that these wards have the highest populations of adults without a high school diploma.

Bilingual Education:
- Romero believes that bilingual education must be reinstated for English learners, saying that "studies have demonstrated that bilingual education is far more effective than English immersion, and separating students based on native language has serious implications for equitable student support and services."

Mexican American Studies:
- Romero thinks that MAS needs to be reinstated, call it "one of the most highly acclaimed programs nation-wide with respect to closing the achievement gap for Latino students" and saying that it is "critical to moving towards a more equitable and effective district for all."

This week's forums are taking place tonight, at Tucson Magnet High School; tomorrow, Nov. 27, at El Pueblo Neighborhood Center, 101 W. Irvington Road; and Wednesday, Nov. 28 at Palo Verde High School, 1302 S. Avenida Vega. All of them are from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.

Check out the full letter below the jump.

Dear Friends & Neighbors,

The quality of our education system is critical to our children’s future as well as the economic, cultural, and social success of our region. As Nelson Mandela once said, “education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.”

It is with this in mind that I share with you some information regarding the Tucson Unified School District (TUSD) and changes pending in our local system. These include proposed school closures and educational equity within our district.

As a TUSD parent, I urge all residents to get involved regarding the issues facing the district today and make your voices heard. Public hearings dealing with the district’s Unitary Status Plan and educational equity will be held Monday 11/26, Tuesday, 11/27, and Wednesday 11/28, with details listed below. Here is my take on a few
issues:

SCHOOL CLOSURES
Recently, TUSD administration published a list of potential school closures. This list includes three neighborhood schools within Ward 1 alone, with several additional proposed closures in the greater South and Southwest areas of our region.

Three local elementary schools on Tucson’s Westside that made the potential closures list are within 1 mile of each other, and service several historic barrios in our community. Manzo Elementary, Menlo Park Elementary, and Brichta Elementary are each unique neighborhood schools home to innovative student-run sustainability programs and recent capital improvements by Pima County and the City of Tucson. If carried out, these closures will funnel students into Tully Elementary, consolidating several sites with exceptionally high Latino populations and further exacerbating district segregation.

According to the Arizona Department of Education, nearly 85% of students in Wards 1 & 5 (representing Tucson’s West and South sides, respectively) are eligible for free and reduced lunch. Per the 2010 census, these same wards have the highest populations of adults with no high school diploma, and of young persons (ages 18-24) that are not in school and have no high school diploma.

While I understand that the district is facing financial challenges, the aforementioned education statistics are not acceptable in our community. Closures, if deemed necessary, must consider these issues and more. The governing board set public hearings on the potential closures for Dec. 8 and Dec. 10, before final votes are taken. Please visit http://www.tusd1.org/contents/distinfo/masterplan/publichearings.asp to learn more and speak out on the proposed closure plan.

BILINGUAL EDUCATION
The state must put an end to the four hour English immersion block and reinstate bilingual education for English language learners.

In the case of English immersion, English learners are separated from their peers to be taught in an isolated environment without the same access to traditional core subject courses. This puts English learners at an additional disadvantage as they move through their educational careers. Studies have demonstrated that bilingual education is far more effective than English immersion, and separating students based on native language has serious implications for equitable student support and services.

MEXICAN AMERICAN STUDIES (MAS)
The recently eliminated Mexican American Studies program in TUSD was and continues to be one of the most highly acclaimed programs nation-wide with respect to closing the achievement gap for Latino students. In a district that is majority-minority, evaluating and promoting programs that advance youth achievement is critical to the success of our overall student body.

Students that see themselves reflected in a culturally, socially, and historically relevant curriculum have demonstrated higher engagement and participation, according to outside analysis and TUSD’s own internal evaluations. Our community pushed for the creation of MAS in response to the clear and pressing need for greater educational equity within the district. These inequities have not disappeared, and until they do it is important to continue advocating on behalf of programs that address the diverse needs of our young people. Reinstating Mexican American Studies is critical to moving towards a more equitable and effective district for all.

Please consider attending one of the following public hearings to address the Unitary Status Plan and educational equity within the district. If you cannot make the public hearings this week, please share your comments online at http://168.174.252.75/usp/index.asp

(read the entire plan here: http://168.174.252.75/usp/Documents/usp.pdf)

TUSD Public Hearings

Monday, November 26, 2012 - 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Tucson High School - 400 North 2nd Ave.

Tuesday, November 27, 2012 - 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
El Pueblo Neighborhood Center - 101 W. Irvington Rd.

Wednesday, November 28, 2012 - 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Palo Verde High School - 1302 S. Avenida Vega


In Community,

Regina Romero

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Comments (11)

Showing 1-11 of 11

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-11 of 11

Add a comment

Staff Pick

Where's Waldo Scavenger Hunt

Back in Tucson for the month of July. Those who spot Waldo (well, a 6" version of… More

@ Antigone Books July 19-31, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. 411 N. Fourth Ave.

» More Picks

Submit an Event Listing

Popular Content

  1. Martha McSally Is Not Endorsing Donald Trump, So You Can Stop Asking About It (The Range: The Tucson Weekly's Daily Dispatch)
  2. The Lowdown on Sonoran Brews (The Range: The Tucson Weekly's Daily Dispatch)
  3. Bill (and Hillary) Clinton's For-Profit College Problem (The Range: The Tucson Weekly's Daily Dispatch)
  4. American Babylon: The "Bernie Problem" (The Range: The Tucson Weekly's Daily Dispatch)
  5. American Babylon: A Conversation with Green Party Candidate Jill Stein (The Range: The Tucson Weekly's Daily Dispatch)

© 2016 Tucson Weekly | 7225 Mona Lisa Rd. Ste. 125, Tucson AZ 85741 | (520) 797-4384 | Powered by Foundation