Thursday, May 31, 2012

Narcotic Bath Salts Are Not the Kind Grandma Uses

Posted By on Thu, May 31, 2012 at 12:00 PM

Did you know about the Salt Institute? Neither did I, until I received a press release from them today and went on their website to learn: "The Salt Institute is a North American based non-profit trade association dedicated to advancing the many benefits of salt, particularly to ensure winter roadway safety, quality water and healthy nutrition."

According to the press release, narcotic bath salts that make you want to eat peoples' faces are different from the kind you like to use in the bath tub. It's a good reminder, just in case you've been casing the Avon products in your grandmother's bathroom.

And the good folks from the Salt Institute will be happier, too, knowing salt is protected and valued and bathed with (If you need more info, here's a CNN post on the difference):

Recent news stories regarding the dangers of “Bath Salts” should not be a cause of concern for individuals who use legitimate bathing salts to sooth aching muscles, according to The Salt Institute.

The "Bath Salts" which some individuals are ingesting are not salt at all. These organic compounds are in fact new to the drug abuse scene and our knowledge of their chemical composition and long-term psychological effects is limited.

We do know, however, that these products often contain amphetamine-like chemicals and are typically administered by swallowing, by inhalation or by injection, with sometimes hallucinogenic and tragic effects. The manufacturers of these products misuse the term “Bath Salts” in order to avoid law enforcement scrutiny and because of the drug’s crystalline appearance.

It is clear that these products should in no way be confused with the traditional bath salts that have been safely used for millennia and were first discovered by the Chinese in 2,700 BCE. These traditional mixtures of inorganic Epsom salt, table salt and baking soda, when added to warm bath water have the effect of soothing sore muscular aches and pains and were even recommended in the medical writings of the ancient physician, Hippocrates.

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