Thursday, May 31, 2012

Mad Men and the Birth Control Debate

Posted By on Thu, May 31, 2012 at 5:10 PM

peg_and_joan.jpg

A few weeks ago I got really obsessed with the show Mad Men, which provides a pretty interesting snapshot of the advertising industry in the early 1960s. And because I think the creators wanted to depict the time period accurately, it’s incredibly sexist. I’ve caught myself muttering expletives at the male characters on my TV more than once in the past week.

That being said, I still like the show and find it pretty intriguing. I like to think that it illustrates how far we’ve come as a society.

Or does it?

Somewhere during the first season, Peggy Olson (Elisabeth Moss), who is arguably the most independent female on the show, opts to go on birth control. The doctor who prescribes the medication condescendingly addresses her and says that she better not think that being on birth control makes it okay for her to whore herself out. Peggy, who is still pretty timid and docile at this point, urges the doctor that she’s not that kind of girl.

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A Native New Yorker Location Is Opening Where the Chuy's Baja Broiler on Speedway Used To Be

Posted By on Thu, May 31, 2012 at 4:00 PM

It looks as if a Native New Yorker restaurant is preparing to move into what was formerly a Chuy's Baja Broiler location at 3100 E. Speedway Blvd.

We just got done checking the city's liquor license register and an application has been filed under the Native New Yorker name for the location. No word yet on when it could open, but it's going to take some time to scrub off all that Chuy's flair, so we're guessing it could be some time.

I am so glad to see that building being put back into use. I get a little misty every time I drive by and see it sitting all lonely and deserted. Has anyone out there eaten at a Native New Yorker? I haven't, but feel free to post any thoughts on the food it serves down in the comments section.

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If You Only Read One Article About Sports Conspiracy Theories Today...

Posted By on Thu, May 31, 2012 at 3:00 PM

I couldn't possibly describe what Patrick Hruby pulls off with his extensive piece on The Post Game today, "The Truth Is Out There," but if you're a fan of sports or conspiracy theories or David Foster Wallace-styled annotations, you'll have to check out how he weaves together Michael Phelps' millisecond win in Bejing, several Super Bowls, international soccer, and the 1985 NBA Draft Lottery that brought Patrick Ewing to New York:

I believe in the fix. I believe in the hidden hand, that sports have a secret, redacted history. I believe that Game 6 of the 2002 NBA Western Conference Finals was a sham, that Spygate was a cover-up of a cover-up, that Super Bowl III was preordained, that Dale Earnhardt Jr.'s heartwarming 2001 victory at Daytona was, in fact, too good to be true, that Michael Jordan's first baseball-playing retirement was anything but, that powerful forces don't want me to write this because powerful forces don't want you to read this. I believe that black is white, white is black, the 1990 World Cup draw was rigged and Sophia Loren was definitely in on the con. Most of all, I believe that on June 18, 1985, inside the Starlight Room of the Waldorf-Astoria hotel in New York City, in front of Pat O'Brien and nearly 150 reporters and umpteen popping flashbulbs and an entire world utterly oblivious to the conspiracy about to take place before them in plain sight, David Joel Stern did not act alone.

Of course, I might be crazy.

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Our Neighbors in Mexico: 'Kids Have Had it Up to Here'

Posted By on Thu, May 31, 2012 at 2:00 PM

On May 10, Weekly World Central ran a great column by our Randy Serraglio on Mexican poet Javier Sicilia's visit to Tucson and his battle against the U.S. war on drugs that has left more than 50,000 Mexican citizens missing or dead, including Sicilia's own son, Juan Francisco. If you missed Serraglio's column, you can read it here.

But here's a snippet:

When Mexican poet Javier Sicilia's son, Juan Francisco, was murdered a year ago, his reaction was similar, in some ways. He dedicated a final poem to him and then declared that he had no more words to put into poetry or express his pain.

Instead, he dedicated his life to publicly identifying exactly what it was that his son was caught up in. That work brought him to the University of Arizona last week, where he laid it out in no uncertain terms for a packed room of hundreds of Tucsonans.

Outgoing Mexican President Felipe Calderón would have you believe that Juan Francisco was up to no good, that he got what he deserved. Calderón's five-year offensive against the drug cartels has resulted in more than 50,000 deaths, 10,000 disappearances and a million people displaced from their homes. He insists that 90 percent of the victims in this ongoing bloodbath are guilty of something.

To think Scilia is alone in his efforts to take on the drug war, you'd be wrong. Thousands of Mexicans are involved in the nonviolent movement — the Movement for Peace with Justice and Dignity. As Serraglio reminds us at the end of his column, Sicilia and others from the movement will be back in Tucson and other state's to remind us of our own culpability in this mess.

But also at the forefront in educating and helping to cover this failed war on drugs is Narco News. Bill Conroy, a regular contributor to the project, recently posted this piece on the news group's website on Mexican president Felipe Calderón's hire of a US PR firm to help out with the G20 Summit (read the post here):

The administration of Felipe Calderón has retained a politically connected US advertising and public relations firm to promote the political and economic agenda of the Mexican president in advance of the upcoming G20 Summit, which will be held in Los Cabos, Mexico, only a few weeks prior to the July 1 Mexican general election.

The move raises serious questions about whether Calderón is skirting, possibly even violating, a Mexican constitutional provision, Article 41, that prohibits the Mexican government from engaging in political promotion and advertising prior to a national election.

The Group of 20 (G20) Summit, a gathering of the leaders from the dominant global economies to be chaired this year by Mexico, will take place in Los Cabos, located on the southern tip of the Mexico’s Baja California peninsula, in mid-June at a plush convention center built for the occasion by the Mexican government at a cost exceeding $100 million. The Mexican government also is kicking in some $47 million to stage and promote the convention itself.

So, when you read these words, don't forget the newest video above. Folks are tired of these miserable policies in the U.S. and Mexico. After all, the 'kids have had it up to here.' Change is coming to Mexico, maybe it will be heading our way, too. We are neighbors. Not that long ago, in Tucson and Pima County, that used to mean something.

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Narcotic Bath Salts Are Not the Kind Grandma Uses

Posted By on Thu, May 31, 2012 at 12:00 PM

Did you know about the Salt Institute? Neither did I, until I received a press release from them today and went on their website to learn: "The Salt Institute is a North American based non-profit trade association dedicated to advancing the many benefits of salt, particularly to ensure winter roadway safety, quality water and healthy nutrition."

According to the press release, narcotic bath salts that make you want to eat peoples' faces are different from the kind you like to use in the bath tub. It's a good reminder, just in case you've been casing the Avon products in your grandmother's bathroom.

And the good folks from the Salt Institute will be happier, too, knowing salt is protected and valued and bathed with (If you need more info, here's a CNN post on the difference):

Recent news stories regarding the dangers of “Bath Salts” should not be a cause of concern for individuals who use legitimate bathing salts to sooth aching muscles, according to The Salt Institute.

The "Bath Salts" which some individuals are ingesting are not salt at all. These organic compounds are in fact new to the drug abuse scene and our knowledge of their chemical composition and long-term psychological effects is limited.

We do know, however, that these products often contain amphetamine-like chemicals and are typically administered by swallowing, by inhalation or by injection, with sometimes hallucinogenic and tragic effects. The manufacturers of these products misuse the term “Bath Salts” in order to avoid law enforcement scrutiny and because of the drug’s crystalline appearance.

It is clear that these products should in no way be confused with the traditional bath salts that have been safely used for millennia and were first discovered by the Chinese in 2,700 BCE. These traditional mixtures of inorganic Epsom salt, table salt and baking soda, when added to warm bath water have the effect of soothing sore muscular aches and pains and were even recommended in the medical writings of the ancient physician, Hippocrates.

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Remember the Easy-Bake Oven? I Do.

Posted By on Thu, May 31, 2012 at 11:00 AM

There are a variety of toys everyone remembers using as some of their favorites when they were growing up. For me, I remember Barbie’s being one of my favorites along with Polly Pockets, Beanie Babies and of course the infamous, Easy-Bake Oven.

I remember begging my mom to buy me one of the Easy-Bake Ovens because my friend, Madison had one and I just HAD to have it. I’m not sure if it was the idea of being able to make my own treats for myself without having to ask Mom or if it was the girly pink spatula and oven that got me. Whatever it was, I loved it.

Take a minute or two and read about the history of the Easy-Bake Oven from one of our alt-weekly brethren. It may bring you back to your childhood memories and favorite toys.

"The Rise and Fall of the Easy-Bake Oven" by Lisa Sorg

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Bike-Powered Delivery Now Available at B Line

Posted By on Thu, May 31, 2012 at 10:27 AM

Oh, the B Line. That little gem of a restaurant with the good beer, the better pie and some of the best casual dining in Tucson. I love sitting at its little counter facing Fourth Avenue while sipping a strong coffee and watching the world move by.

Of course, the B Line is currently one of the businesses dealing with the construction making Downtown look like a scene from a Mad Max movie. So if you're scared of all that chain-link fencing and construction equipment - which you shouldn't be because there's tons of parking right off the Avenue - the B Line will bring its fine bistro fare right to your door via it's new bike-powered delivery service.

Delivery is available from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday, in an area bordered by Granada Avenue, Broadway Boulevard, Campbell Avenue and Elm Street, and it is free.

Check in over here for more information.

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CD8: Barber Announces He's Raised Nearly $1.2 Million for Campaign

Posted By on Thu, May 31, 2012 at 10:00 AM

Democrat Ron Barber announced this morning that he had raised $641,000 during the second reporting period of the special election to complete Gabby Giffords' congressional term.

That brings Barber's total for the campaign to nearly $1.2 million.

Republican Jesse Kelly has not not yet released a fundraising report.

While the candidates have been spending hundreds of thousands of dollars, the race has also been notable for the spending from national players such as the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, the National Republican Congressional Committee, Citizens United and the House Majority PAC.

Here's the press release from Team Barber:

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Staff Pick

Stayin' Alive: A Benefit for HOPE Animal Shelter and Tucson CARES

A dyn-o-mite evening of disco, fabulous raffles, outta sight vegan food, local roller derby divas, boogie down… More

@ Shelter Cocktail Lounge Fri., Sept. 30, 5-9 p.m. 4155 E. Grant Road.

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